Tag Archives: writing prompts

Writing Tips: The Five Senses

18 Mar

Special thanks goes out to actress, director, and dancer, Gracie Dzienny, for quoting my first novel, November Snow, on her Twitter. She is known for her work on Nickelodeon’s Supah Ninjas and multiple shows on AwesomenessTV. Visit her YouTube channel by clicking here.

Grace

 

nice

“This is a story of forbidden love, hidden love, and a war of love.” Find out why Endless Reading said they can’t wait to read Seconds Before Sunrise in the latest review of Minutes Before Sunset by clicking here.

I wrote this post in a way I don’t normally do so. Below, I ranked the five senses from easiest to hardest in terms of including them into a story – which was a task in itself because I kept questioning my order – and then I choose a random chapter in the middle of two of my novels – Seconds Before Sunrise (SBS) and November Snow (NS) – to tally my use of the senses. So the tallies might seem contradicting because I wrote the post before I collected the tallies to see if my perception was the same as my reality. Then, below that, I have a quote from those of you who commented on my Facebook author page.

Join me on FB, and your responses might be used next!

Join me on FB, and your responses might be used next!

But I want to add one last thing: there are many novels that do not include one or more of these senses for many reasons, mainly novels that cover blindness or deafness. Although those novels are very strong, I am dealing with the average novel that cover all senses in order to explore which senses are the most and least difficult to use so that we can analyze our styles together in order to improve in our five categories. But I want to thank those writers who have written novels with blind, deaf, or other protagonists in those various fields, so thank you.

#1 Sight

I’m not sure many will argue this being the easiest, especially if the novel is in first person. We see from the character’s eyes – and we see a lot. Whether they’re looking at road while driving or searching a library for answers, their eyes are working to keep the story moving forward.

Tally: Since both of my novels are from first perspectives, I decided not to tally this one at all because it’s practically every other sentence.

Paul Davis: “Sight is the easiest by far. I think it’s really easy to forget touch and smell.”

#2 Sound

I decided to forget about dialogue in order to really study this sense in reading and writing. If I included dialogue – just hearing someone speak – then this would probably be like number one, but I thought that was too obvious. However, I am including the way someone’s voice sounds, but I mainly wanted to hear thunder or creaking doors or a television rattling on a stand as a train zooms by an open window. Because of this, I did not include dialogue associated sounds in the tallies.

NS: 11: “Trees brushed against each other to the never-ending music of the crisp, November wind.”

SBS: 6: “…a rush of sounds consumed my senses.”

Alexis Danielle Allinson: The easiest I think is sound as we are taught to familiarize a sound with a distinct description from an early age.

#3 Taste

I think this was the first one I wrote down. For me, taste isn’t necessarily the hardest sense; it’s just the least likely used. A character needs to be eating or kissing or in an accident or a vampire or something along those lines to be reminded of taste.

SBS: 5 “I opened my mouth to speak but spit blood out instead. He wiped it away, but I tasted it.”

NS: 2 “A stream of salty water drove down my cheek to my lips.”

Alexis Danielle Allinson: Taste is the hardest as everyone does this different from each other.

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#4 Touch

At this point, I have moved the five senses around on my list so many times that I don’t even know if this is where this sense originally started, but alas – this is where it ends up. For me, touch is a debatable and difficult area. Sure, characters can “grab” something, but that doesn’t necessarily make it “touch.” I feel like touch must be how rough a surface is, how cold someone’s skin is, how gravel coats hands with powdery dust. Touch isn’t a verb. Touch has texture or a sensation. 

NS: 13 “My lips were still tingling.”

SBS: 8 “The suffocating air was filled with electricity, and it burned against my exposed flesh.”

Aurélia Evangelaire: And still as a writer, the easiest sense for me to use is touch. I like the feeling of things under hands and I love to describe it.

#5 Smell

Oh, god. This exercise is not easy. At this point, I realize I didn’t know how hard it is to choose which sense goes on what ranking. You think you do until you try. It was really difficult to choose the most difficult, but I finally went with smell because smell, in many ways, is like taste. It’s limited in the sense (haha, see what I did there?) that it’s difficult to include this sense without it seeming forced. It’s often rare moments a character takes the time to “smell the roses.” Just like real people, their lives are hectic – they may even be chased around by enemies – and it’s often the slower, more intimate moments that they have smell. This goes to say that I just had another instance where I realized how the senses change dramatically over genres. I feel like smell, taste, and touch are much easier and more important in romance, especially erotica, but those same senses may not be at the top for things like sci-fi, especially if they are in a space suit that prevents all kinds of smells.

SBS: 11 “The smell of smoke broke through the blood dripping from my nose.”

NS:5 “The rusty smell of whiskey split the air.”

Phillip Peterson Smell, I think, is the easiest and most useful. It’s more of an all-encompassing scent to the scene, which, if done well, can most effectively put the reader into your world (as smell is the most connected to memory).

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Those are my five senses as well as a few other writers’ senses.

It was a fun exercise to write down what I thought about the five senses before going through my novel to tally away. In the end, this allowed me to see the difference in my perspective and in reality. (Like how I used smell a lot more than taste.) I definitely recommend writers try this out themselves. I realized quickly that senses change dramatically from novel to novel. For instance, the setting in November Snow is very dirty and dangerous, so sound and touch were actually HUGE. Taste? Not so much. But Seconds Before Sunrise was nearly the opposite. Then again, these were only passages. It would take me weeks to analyze the entire novels, but I still think this is worth it.

You must be tempted by now.

You must be tempted by now.

What about you? Did you try this exercise? Do you have certain senses you use more? Ones that you avoid? Were your results different than what you thought they would be?

Comment below!

P.S. “Look Inside” of Seconds Before Sunrise is now up on Amazon! Check it out by clicking the book cover on the right :D

~SAT

Challenge Your Inspirations

17 Nov

Fact of the Day: this is my 200th post.

If you follow my Facebook Author Page, then you already saw the photo I’m about to share. But this is at the beginning for a reason:

Yesterday, after sharing my journal excerpt that inspired Seconds Before Sunrise (The Timely Death Trilogy), Minutes Before Sunset hit #586 in Books > Romance > Paranormal on Amazon.com! Thank you for sharing my dreams with me.

#586

#586

So, yes, thank you so much! It’s an amazing feeling to know my inspiration can inspire others, and that’s why I wanted to say this: although my dreams inspire me, you all are my ultimate inspiration. Your support, encouragement, and kind words continuously bring a smile to my face.

I know I often mention how inspired I am by dreams—how my novels are derived from my nightmares—but today I wanted to talk about four other ways writers can find inspiration. Who knows? Maybe you’ll try one outside of your usual inspiration and find a new love you would’ve never expected:

People:

Unless you’re a hermit, people are all around us. Society holds teachers, parents, kids, cops, doctors, hippies, and so many other kinds. And they can all be heroes. (They can also be villains.) I think psychology is one of the fundamentals to life—and it transfers to writing. Knowing how people work or where they come from can help create more realistic and rounded characters—especially if you get to know more unique individuals. Taking a moment to talk to someone you never thought you’d talk to might end up in a novel one day.

Events/Stories:

As a child, I clearly remember reading an article over an eight-year-old organ donor who saved ten lives. This story struck me as beautifully tragic, but it is so alike to the 2008 movie “Seven Pounds” that I wondered if maybe the writer saw an article just like I had. Basing a story off of news events is pretty common. But there are also tales, mythology, classical literature, legends, and more. Recently, for instance, I shared “6 Baffling Discoveries that Science Can’t Explain.” The point of this was simple: mysteries from real life can often inspire fiction or the famous Mark Twain quote, “Truth is stranger than fiction.”

Traveling:

Most people wish they could do more of this, but it’s expensive and time consuming. If you can, great! Travel away. I find traveling to be one of the most energizing life experiences, but, like many, I can’t do it as much as I’d like. Thank goodness for the internet. The World Wide Web has hundreds—millions—of websites dedicated to traveling and/or learning about other countries. It’s not as authentic, of course, but it can spark the imagination. One of the best articles I read recently was “He Was Arrested 20 Times For This. But I Think It’s TOTALLY Worth It.” The article follows photographer, Dan Marbaix, as he travels the world, trespassing into abandoned locations. Just seeing these unsettling photos is enough to make your mind wander.

Drugs & Alcohol:

I am, by no means, encouraging this. Again, I am not encouraging this. I’m actually very against using anything that can be potentially harmful for inspiration. But, nevertheless, this is a commonly used tool. In fact, there are entire articles dedicated to this topic, including this one, “Top 10 Substance-Addled Writers.” Reasons for this seem to be simple: drugs altar the mind and body. It can often relax the creative walls artists put up. But I think there are better and healthier ways than this.

So what to do?

Try talking to someone you wouldn’t usually talk to. Try going somewhere you haven’t been before or somewhere you never thought you’d like to go. Read about cultures you’ve never been interested in. Or, if you have extra time and money, travel somewhere.

If you share your story and/or a unique idea in the comments, you might be the one picked to be a guest blogger!

~SAT

Writing Tips: Method Acting

9 Aug

Method acting–if you’re familiar with it, you probably start thinking of Heath Ledger, Robert De Niro, or Daniel Day-Lewis. If you’re not familiar with it, it’s defined as an acting method in which actors and actresses never break character while shooting a film. Another aspect some consider “Method Acting” is when actors go to extremes, like Christian Bale’s loss of 63 lbs for his character in The Machinist.

But did you ever think about doing something like this for your novels?

I am here to admit that I have, and I am here to admit it with an insane amount of embarrassing (but fun) detail! Let me explain: I love writing. I do. But I sometimes get headaches from how long I end up staring at my computer screen. When this happens, I do something…different. I get out of my chair and pretend I am a character. I will talk like that character and jump around to become other characters. If someone walked in on me doing this, I’d probably look like a toddler who ate too much candy while trying to explain a bizarre dream I’d had earlier that morning. But it works for me, and it’s not the only thing I do. I’ve gone to cafes specifically because my character would. I also practice dialogue in my car. So I’m sure someone out there has seen me screaming at myself. (What can I say? Some scenes get intense.)

So why do I do this? 

Although we are “in character” when we are writing, we are generally sitting at a desk, hunched over a notebook or keyboard. We are writing about living (actions and words) but we may not practice them out loud and see what it’d actually look and feel like. For instance, I will actually lay physical objects down when writing out any kind of scene to see if the movements my characters make don’t conflict with how they are speaking. I wouldn’t want one character to move across the entire room and whisper. So I like knowing it would work out in the physical world. Same with dialogue. It may read really well, but I’ve spoken it out loud just to realize it sounds ridiculous. And, if I can’t scream it when I’m in their mind, my character isn’t going to scream it. Lesson learned. They are in control–even if I am the one creating them.

Basically:

Acting can help writing, even if you’re not an actor. Honestly, I took an acting class in high school, and I was probably the worst in the class. I can’t act. But I can get into character in my own way–and connect with my writing in a physical way that may help me take it to the next level. I’m not suggesting losing 63 lbs like Christian Bale. (In fact, please don’t.) But I would suggest trying to get up from the desk and take on your novel in real life. It might give you a new perspective.

And this is me--"acting" at 3 years old in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Yeah for the 90's.

And this is me–”acting” at 3 years old in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Yeah for the 90′s.

One last thing:

Minutes Before Sunset has been added to Goodreads: Best of Little-Known Authors, and I’d really appreciate some supportive votes to move upwards in the list. Even better, you can add your novels too! If you send me a link, I’ll vote for yours too :D You can vote for 100 books.

I also have a lot of exciting news coming soon! Can’t wait to share. 

~SAT

Writing Tips From My Film Class.

6 Aug

As many of you know, I am about to go into my last semester at the University of Kansas. (I cannot wait to graduate!) School is a big part of my life right now, so that’s why I like to share my favorite books that we read during my classes. Since my summer semester just ended, I thought I’d do that again–except there’s one big difference: it was History of the International Sound to Film. Basically, we watched a lot of movies during the World War II era (before, during, and right after.)

Before I begin, you might be asking: what does this have to do with writing? I’m getting to that. I promise.

When I need more writing tips, I cuddle with Bogart.

When I need more writing tips, I cuddle with Bogart.

There were too many movies to post on one page (seriously) so I’m only sharing my favorites:

  • Under the Roofs of Paris (Rene Clair, 1930, France)
  • The Private Life of Henry VIII (Alexander Korda, 1933, Britain)
  • Listen to Britain (Humphrey Jennings & Stewart McAllister, 1942)
  • Alexander Nevsky (Sergei Eisenstein, 1938)
  • Port of Shadows (Marcel Carne, 1938)
  • The Bicycle Thief (Vittorio De Sica, 1948)
I also put writing tips on my Facebook Page!

I also put writing tips on my Facebook Page!

I don’t think I would’ve ever seen these movies if it weren’t for that class, although I wish I could say I would’ve. They were very enlightening in the sense that I do love older movies, yet I’ve never really watched the ones that were used politically from other countries during the war. It puts a twist on things, and it made me think. So this is where I get into writing tips. I’m always trying to find new ways to look at writing, and, when I look at life a little differently, I decide to line it up with writing. In this case, I thought about two things:

1. Silent Films: Imagine how difficult getting a story across must be when you cannot even tell the story. It’s like playing charades. As writers, we don’t necessarily have to worry about this, because our job is to tell the story. But what if we took a step back? What if we had to make a silent film out of the story? Imagine what would come across the clearest, what would be the most difficult, and how you would set things up to describe everything. I tried this prompt myself, and I might share it in the future ;] But, for now, all I will say is that it forces more emotions to come to the surface (and it might even help you change those pesky scenes that didn’t quite feel right and/or cut them completely)

2. The Other Side: Like I said, most of these films were foreign, so it was interesting to see how the rest of the world artistically displayed the war. Even more interesting? They all had the basic concepts laid out the same. However, I thought you could try an interesting prompt: imagine your story is being told by the other side, (in this case, by the enemy, or someone near the enemy.) How would they see things? Maybe they aren’t so evil, after all.

Who knows? Maybe you can combine the two and come up with a silent expression from the other side. That would be something, even if it were only for you to see. 

~SAT

P.S. Please support these wonderful writers and readers who’ve interviewed me and read Minutes Before Sunset:

Interview: 

Urban fantasy and paranormal romance writer, S.L. Stacy, took a moment to interview me, and it was lovely. My favorite (and fun) question? “If you could be bffs (best friends forever) with any fictional character, who would it be?” Find out who I picked here.

Reviews:

KatrPilr: Writer, Life-Living Extraordinaire: “The concept of Minutes Before Sunset is a breath of fresh air in a YA genre crowded with werewolves and vampires. Shannon A. Thompson artfully weaves two worlds together from two different perspectives: Eric’s, and Jessica’s. The result is well-rounded, in-depth characters, and a seamless story, while still retaining enough mystery to keep me wanting more.” Read the rest here.

Joe Hinojosa, Random thoughts from a random mind: “Thematically, the story deals with issues of prophecy and destiny, responsibility and free-will, and friendship and love. It deals with how people compartmentalize their lives, keeping a public face while at the same time harboring a private identity…Honestly, I have to say that it was an enjoyable read, so much so that I immediately read it again.” Read the rest here.

I’m always available for interviews and reviews at ShannonAThompson@aol.com. I will share it on all of my websites, and I will also supply you with a free ebook copy of Minutes Before Sunset. (My dream right now is to do an interview after someone has read it and asks about details in the book. Wink. Wink.)

But I’m off to complete more edits of Seconds Before Sunrise! Can’t wait for the release this fall!

~SAT 

Writing and Airports

4 Aug

Writing and airports. What do they have in common? I’m sure I could come up with a creative joke, but I’d rather move right on to this writing prompt. For the past few weeks, I’ve been spending a lot of time in, out, and around airports. Those little moments brought lingering thoughts of potential plots and/or characters. Why? Because I was surrounded by new people every second, and getting out of the house can truly clear the clouded mind.

This is why I want to talk about “people watching.” I think it’s a commonly used phrase, but if you haven’t heard it before it means exactly what it sounds like: watching people. A lot of people do this for all kinds of reasons: to learn, to recognize behavioral patterns, etc. But I think this is a great opportunity for writers, because writers put a lot of pressure on themselves within their stories to make it as believable as possible (even if it’s completely fiction.) So how do writers get around this conundrum of creating the illusion of fiction seeming factual?

We study. We research. We talk to anyone we know who might have experience in the topics or attitudes we want to write about. But what happens when this inspiration runs out, and we get writer’s block?

We have to find a way around it.

I just took my father to the airport for a trip to Alaska. Traveling is a great way to spark the writing flame too. This is from our trip to DC in 2010.

I just took my father to the airport for a trip to Alaska. Traveling is a great way to spark the writing flame too. This is from our trip to DC in 2010.

Now, I have to clarify that I really believe writer’s block comes from one of two things:

1. Forcing something to happen.

2. Putting pressures on yourself for all kinds of reasons.

But I still think we get out of writer’s block by taking a step back and returning to the simple love of writing–or, what I call, the imagination.

Airports are full of imagination opportunities: different people, coming and going to who knows where. Possibility excites me, and writing in airports brought a sense of freedom I forget to practice sometimes. In a way, this writing prompt is less about writing in airports and more about switching things up. For instance, if you always write at home, try going to the coffee shop a few days in a row. I say a few days in a row, because it often takes some time to feel comfortable enough with the new area to fall in to the fluidity of writing.

This is why I have a journal specifically for traveling. I seem to notice more when I’m traveling, because I’m attempting to take everything in all of the time. Some of my favorite writing is while I’m in moments like this, because I can focus ten times more than I can on a day-to-day basis.

So write while your on vacation this summer. Try going to a new place to reignite your passion for the imagination–like an airport or park. You might be surprised–your writing can change, even if only for a moment.

~SAT

Website Wonders

30 Jul

Website Update: Minutes Before Sunset hit 100 adds on Goodreads with a 4.7 star rating! 

So I want to share more websites I’ve come across for writing and/or writing tips. But I’m really interested if any of you have done any from the first list. For the life of me, I cannot figure out how to reblog, so I’m clarifying this part is NOT me. I’m simply curious to see how others feel about this list, because I found it to be very unique in terms of writing tips. Granted, I’m only putting the tips down–not the explanation, so you should probably go to the article :D

This is from VictoriaMixon.com (and here is the link to the article)

10 Things To Do To Become a Better Writer in 10 Days:

1. Spend one day being a troll.

2. Spend one whole day being silent.

3. Spend one day as a student of reality.

4. Spend one day with the lyrics of your favorite songs.

5. Spend one day writing and re-writing a single scene.

6. Spend one day on research.

7. Spend one day watching children.

8. Spend one day crying.

9. Spend one day laughing at things nobody thinks are funny but you.

10. Spend one whole day being grateful.

Shannon again. Whether or not you’ve read the article, what did you think of these tips? 

Personally, I really liked numbers 3, 6, and 7. I liked 3 and 6, because I think research is really important, but it can also be fun, and I think a lot of people forget that it can be fun. (That’s why I try to share websites like the websites on my post Writing Tips: Setting: Picking a Location.) I think 7 is great, because children can teach everyone a lot. Sometimes, as adults, we think too hard about things. I, personally, love learning when I’m around kids, because they remind me of the obvious–something that can truly morph writing, especially when writing about younger people.

But number 10 is perhaps the most important. Be grateful. I like that, and I value it.

So I wanted to thank everyone with a little piece of comedy from Rebecca Johnson (@johnsonr)

ia8yy

One last thing!

Today is my last post during July! So I wanted to take another moment to thank everyone for this wonderful month of sales and ratings of Minutes Before Sunset during the time it will always be Goodreads Book of the Month

Thank you :D

I’m still giving away free copies in exchange for review, and I’m doing interviews as well–so feel free to email shannonathompson@aol.com at any time, and I’ll get right back to you!

Seconds Before Sunrise is still on the way, and the future seems…well…seconds away! I cannot wait for it, and I can’t wait to hear your thoughts on the writing tips.

Have a great week,

~SAT

Writing Tips: Setting: Picking a Location

23 May

Before I begin today’s post topic, I have two things to address: 

First: Special thanks to Nicole Lee at “Ennlee’s Reading Corner” for reviewing Minutes Before Sunset:  “…The book alternates between the point of view of each of the main characters without a set pattern, and Ms. Thompson should be commended for her ability to create two characters that are similar enough to keep these sections from being disjointed, but different enough that the reader can tell in an instant who is speaking…”

Click here to read the rest.

As of now, Minutes Before Sunset is rated 4.5 stars on Amazon, 4 stars on Barnes & Noble, and 4.7 stars on Goodreads. Thank you to everyone who has read and reviewed! An author always appreciates the dedicated and honest support. 

This picture means a lot to me. These are two great friends of mine that I met at the University of Kansas, William and Brooke Jones, and you might notice what William is holding: my first novel, November Snow. Support (and friendship) like this is priceless.

This picture means a lot to me. These are two great friends of mine that I met at the University of Kansas, William and Brooke Jones, and you might notice what William is holding: my first novel, November Snow. Support (and friendship) like this is priceless.

Second: As many of you know, I held another contest where the winners receive a free account at Happify, a website dedicated to bringing happiness to social media within a great community of encouraging peers. The winners are:

whiteravensoars: Random Acts of Writing (invitation sent)

Ky Grabowski: Welcome to the inner workings of my mind (invitation sent)

willowysp: Freefall (I need an email)

Nicole Lee: Ennlee’s Reading Corner (invitation sent)

Amber Skye Forbes: Writing Words with the Tips of my Toes (invitation sent)

Based on status, you’ll receive a confirmation. (If you don’t fell comfortable sharing your email on my comments, please send an email to ShannonAThompson@aol.com identifying yourself, so I can send the invite) Follow me here, so I can find you, and I’ll  be sure to follow back!

Now, onto today’s post:

I wanted to discuss “setting” in a novel, but I specifically wanted to share websites where you can find more information on your place (or perhaps browse the world for inspiration, even if your setting is in another world entirely.)

I think your background is a great place to start. Everyone has heard “write what you know,” and there is truth in it. Placing your novel in a place your extremely familiar with is the easiest route (not necessarily the right route), and this can make descriptions easier. For instance, Minutes Before Sunset takes place in Hayworth, Kansas. This is not a real town. It’s actually a play on Hays and Ellsworth, both towns in Kansas. I haven’t lived in these locations, but I have been to them, and I currently live in Kansas, so I am very familiar with the culture, layout, and how the weather works. Plus, I wanted an ironic name. Since the novel is about a dark fate, it only seemed appropriate (and humorous) to have a name that suggested the town was worthy.

In regards to familiarity, another thing to think about is your basic settings. By this, I am referencing your rooms. I’ve discussed interior maps before, and every house in Minutes Before Sunset is based off of a real house I’ve lived in (aside from Eric’s. That’s my dream home.) And the maps are available on the Minutes Before Sunset extra’s page.

Back to location:

If you’re looking for a place you’re not entirely familiar with, I wanted to give a great website out there for beginning, especially if you’re not positive on what you’re looking for.

Earth Album Alpha: This is a slick flicker collection of photos, virtually capable in regards to clicking anywhere on the map just to see an arrangement of pictures from the specific country. This can be very broad, but it can also help narrow down what you’re looking for. As an example, the picture below is of Serbia. (I clicked randomly.) You’ll see a collection of tiny pictures at the top, which you can enlarge, that will show the region. In particular, this country has a lot of beautiful fields, so you may not be interested in Serbia, but you might realize you want an open space, and you can go from there.

Earth Album Alpha

Earth Album Alpha

Do you like these tips? Join my Facebook page for more!

Do you like these tips? Join my Facebook page for more!

Weather Base: This website helps summarize what happens in regards to weather in the average year based on the location you choose. This is actually a traveling website, meant for tourists to figure out ideal weather to travel in, but you can learn whatever you want all over the world. I really recommend checking these things, because fallacies can happen in location, if you’re not familiar with how citizens live beneath the weather clouds. A good example of this is the famous young-adult novel, Twilight. Although Meyer set it in a rain-prone state, the amount of rain she used was very unrealistic to the location. In an interview, she even admitted that she visited for weeks without rain and was quite disappointed with her lack of research. However, she was delighted to bring tourism to the city that wasn’t known before. So there are pros and cons to everything.

American Culture: If you want to stay in the states, this blog is full of information about history, culture, language, education, and more. It even includes family arrangements, death rituals, and relationships to other countries where these things may have taken place originally. This won’t only help your setting; it can help your characters round out as they’ll have a family background stabilized within reality. For instance, it may remind you of the variation in language used across certain areas. An exact quote: “Korean, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Tagalog due to immigration from the countries where those languages are spoken, and to a certain extent French, primarily in far north New England, due to the Acadian-Canadian influence, and in Louisiana (Cajun).”

My hopes is that sites like this will help the initial process of choosing a location you (as much as your readers) feel connected to as much as your characters will be grounded in it. 

If you have any other sites, comment below! And, as usual, if you have a topic you want to hear about, let me know, and I’ll credit your blog for asking the question on that post.

I hope everyone is having a great time! (Paperback news is coming soon!)

Goodreads Quote of the day“I was falling in love with her, and she was falling in love with me. It was fated, decided before any of us were born, and I hated it as much as I loved it. I could barely stand it.” (Eric, Minutes Before Sunset)

~SAT

Writing Tips: How I Form Dialogue into Writing:

26 Dec

I separate writing into steps, so work with me here, and read twice if you need to start over after the end. This is an excerpt from chapter thirteen in a writing of mine, so don’t read for content; read for basic instruction to help focus on one writing aspect at a time.

First: Dialogue

Personally, I like to write out my dialogue at once, using an abbreviation for who’s speaking, so I know who’s speaking when I come back. This way, I don’t have to worry about description, but I can simply concentrate on the art of conversation.

In this scene, my protagonist, Amea (A), is crying with her back to the door when Emmy (E) checks on her.

EX:

A—What?

E—It’s Emmy.” “Are you crying?”

A—No

E—Good

A—What are you doing here? Where’s Leena?

E—Still sleeping.” “I was in the garden. I don’t play much, but do you want to come with me?

Second: Conversational Description

This is where I separate the speech, so it sounds more realistic and/or add basic character descriptions.

EX:

“What?”

“It’s Emmy,” she said, and I slid the door open as I wiped my tears away. She frowned. “Are you crying?” she asked, and I shook my head. “Good.” (I cut this dialogue to make it sound younger, as Emmy is nine.) 

“What are you doing here? Where’s Leena?”

“Still sleeping.” Emmy shrugged “I was in the garden. I don’t play much, but—” She grinned with crooked teeth. “Want to come with me?”

Third: Further Description and Edit

This part is where I add the description, placing the basic scene and adding to the dialogue with scenic descriptions

EX:

I slammed my bedroom door and pressed my back against it, sobbing. Water curled down my fingers, and I clutched my face, falling to the ground. I laid my forehead on my shaky knees as my body shuddered, vibrating as knocking rocked my entrance. (All of this is added)

“What?”

“It’s Emmy,” she said, and I scooted forward, (added necessary movement) sliding the door open as I wiped my tears away. She frowned, pulling at the ends of her curly red hair (added childish action), and rocked back and forth. “Are you crying?” she asked, and I shook my head. “Good.”

I smiled. “What are you doing here? Where’s Leena?”

“Still sleeping.” Emmy shrugged, pointing down the hall. (added—hall for scene) “I was in the garden. I don’t play much, but—” She grinned with crooked teeth. “Want to come with me?”

Four: EDIT EDIT EDIT.

It is necessary, so take that beautiful red pen of yours and get to work :D

I hope this may separate your writing into bits in which you can concentrate on important aspects one at a time, rather than worry all at once.

Have fun and write endlessly,

 

~SAT

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