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#WW How To Be The Perfect Writer

7 Oct

The other day, I went to pick up my father at the airport. Knowing it might be a long wait, I decided to listen to NPR, a favorite station of mine. The theme of the day was creativity, and considering how suiting it was, I knew I would love it no matter what, but much to my writer’s delight, the main speaker, Sir Ken Robinson, blew me away.

Sir Ken Robinson actually is a “sir,” knighted by the queen herself due to his contributions in the arts in general and in regards to education. To this day, he’s even the most popular TED talk out there. Naturally, I felt compelled by him, but one quote said during the discussion has not left me, nor do I believe it ever will.

“Practice doesn’t make us perfect, but it helps you realize you don’t have to be.”

The phrase stuck me when he said it, and the phrase strikes me now as I type it out, really feeling the words for what they are. Let them sit with you for a moment if you will.

We, for most of our lives, are pounded with the phrase “practice makes perfect.” We are told failure is more or less the worst thing that can happen to you, and if you fail, it is 100% your fault and something to feel shame from. The concept “practice makes perfect” is disheartening, and at its core, it prevents us from taking risks, from reattempting, and mainly, from growing. Now, I’m not saying that practice isn’t great. Of course it is great. But weighing “practice” against “perfect” is where we go wrong.

No one is perfect. I would have to bet J.K. Rowling even finds spelling errors in her work, especially after sending it off to her editor, but I doubt she tells herself she’ll never try to write again because she forgot the “t” in “the” and Microsoft didn’t catch it because “he” is also a word.

See? Even programs aren’t perfect—and they’re literally designed to be.


A part of art is failure, because a part of the soul is failure.

We seek out imperfections in heroes and heroines because they are flawed just like we are. It is what makes them human, and it also why we find ourselves able to love them.

Practice is vital, continuing to hone your art is necessary, and striving for better is always the ultimate goal. But do not allow yourself to be discouraged by imperfections. Find the beauty in them. Overcome the ones you can. Strive forward knowing you’ve grown from them. And realize, none of us our perfect. I mean…none of us are perfect. ;)

The “perfect” writer is not perfect at all.

And now…a video from Sir Ken Robinson. (It’s his original TED talk that became very popular, and it’s about the education system, so it’s not necessarily about the topic I discussed above, but I thought you all might like to listen to it, since I just talked about him.)


Help me out and vote for Minutes Before Sunset on Dalitopia Media for a chance to win a free book trailer. All you have to do is click this Facebook link and “like” the photo on Facebook. Any and all “likes” are appreciated. :)

I still have 1 Halloween-themed box set of The Timely Death Trilogy available. Each box set includes 3 signed books, a signed bookmark, a bat or spider ring, and a personalized note from me. They cost $40.00 with free shipping in the U.S. Email me at if you’re interested.


Also this October, the paperback of Death Before Daylight releases on October 19! Two days later, on October 21, you can come see me at Headrush Coffee and Tea Roasters in Kansas City, Missouri for a paranormal talk and book signing.  It will be tons of fun!

bixserMinutes Before Sunset: book 1

AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooksKoboGoodreads

Seconds Before Sunrise: book 2

AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooksKoboGoodreads

Death Before Daylight: book 3

AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooksKoboGoodreads

#MondayBlogs Finding Your Author’s Voice

5 Oct


Voice. A singular word that makes most writers cringe, especially if you’re just starting out. But it doesn’t have to! Finding your “voice” can be a fun adventure, and today, author Ryan Attard, is discussing the ever-dreaded topic most avoid.

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in guest articles are those of the author/s and do not necessarily reflect my own. To show authenticity of the featured writer, articles are posted as provided (a.k.a. I do not edit them). However, the format may have changed.

Finding your Author’s Voice by Ryan Attard

If you’ve been writing for any length of time, you would have come across the concept of an author’s voice – one of the most confusing concepts out there in terms of writer’s education. We hear it all the time, whether we are writing a book, talking about one, or even writing those dreaded query letters; readers, writers and agents alike are all seeking voice.

But what the hell is this thing?

Your voice is your identity as a writer; it’s what makes your words yours (barring some long and boring copyright agreement that I will not include here, because I’d like everyone to read this without feeling like they have to drive a long rush nail into their cerebral cortex afterwards).

Your voice is who you are; what makes you choose what words to write; or what drives you to write them in the first place. But without going all Flower Power, let’s talk about this from a technical perspective.

When you read an author, if they have found their voice, you will find yourself inevitably either loving or hating that author. There is very little middle ground here, simply because now you know what that author is all about. You know where they’re going to go, even if they get better – and that either jives with you or it doesn’t. This is what differs a pro writer from someone who’s just starting out. The reason why established authors tend to sell a bajillion copies of their work is because we as readers identify with that story – or rather the voice of that author in telling the story.

I know… no one said this was easy to wrap your head around.

Think of J.K. Rowling for example. Yeah, Harry Potter is a great story, and it’s got its ups and down, but the reason fans still go gaga over it years after the last book (and movie) ended is because of Rowling’s voice. We can all sit down and write the exact same story, with the exact same characters and mechanics (but no Time-turner cos that’s bullshit!) and we’d all end up with a slightly different story – better or worse. A more recent example is Patrick Rothfuss: story-wise there is little to engage us in his series. On face value it’s about a guy telling us about his past in a school. So why does it have raving fans (guilty as charged) clamoring for the third book, like a riot happening outside of Conan Doyle’s house when he literally threw Sherlock of a cliff? (okay, technically it was a waterfall, but that really doesn’t have the same punch does it?)

The point is, a massive success goes beyond the perfect plot. It takes an author who really knows themselves and who really knows not only what they are writing about but also who are they writing for, as well as why; all in addition to a great story.

Better yet, that great story has to fit your author’s voice. This is a rookie mistake (one that I am guilty of) – we see something on TV, or read something awesome, and be like “Hey, I can do that!”

No, you can’t. Or rather, you can, but expect it to go down the crapper at around page 17. Sure if you want to steal an idea, or a setting, or a trope, it’s all fair game. ‘Talent borrows, Genius steals,’ as Oscar Wilde said.

But whatever you do make sure it all fits with YOU – as an artist, as a creator. It’s common when starting out have an inconsistent voice. Think of it in this way: when we are children we hear all sorts of phrases and inflections and whatnot, and we simply imitate. And the only way we have of sifting through this chaos is by doing it even more, eventually eliminating what sounds unnatural to us.


This is why most writers tell you to “keep writing” – this is why we have that 10,000 hours rule of thumb. The more you write, the more familiar you get with your author’s voice… or voices, cos there is no rule that say you can’t have multiple voices (cue Prozac joke here), just as there is no rule that says you can only write in one genre.

So how can you find your author’s voice? Well, you can write, write and then write some more… but there is a way to shortcut it – if you think about it.

Yeah, that’s the trick… think about it. Simply reread some of your stuff, analyze what you’re doing, and pick what sounds most natural. It takes time, sure, but more importantly it takes dedication and the willingness to go through with your crazy ideas (some of which you really need to write down).

And once you find your voice, you’re golden. Because whether you are writing the next bestseller, a query letter, or even a tweet, you will have identified yourself through your writing. I’ll end with this quote from Youtuber and fellow author Garrett Robinson (whose video inspired me to write this post. Highly recommend you checking it out here) who said:

“An author’s voice, once perfected, is more unique to them that their fingerprints.”

May you go forth and write according to the voices in your head,

Ryan Attard


Ryan Attard is the author of the Legacy series, The Pandora Chronicles and, as of recently, Evil Plan Inc. When not tormenting his protagonists or ruling over his imaginary worlds, Ryan can be found within the confines of his house on an island far, far away, either geeking out about the latest book or manga chapter he read, or a television show he just finished watching.

He can also be found spewing his opinions and telling terrible jokes on his weekly podcast, The Lurking Voice podcast, which can be found through his website (although if you are easily offended you should definitely not listen).

He is also the kind of person who writes about himself in the third person.




Join the Mailing List and get an exclusive free copy of the Legacy Short Story Collection – 1 novella, 6 short stories and 50K+ words of pure awesome.  Sign up now!

Want to be a guest blogger? Now is the time to submit. I will be stopping guest blog posts in November, but before then, I would love to have you on! I am accepting original posts that focus on reading and writing. Pictures, links, and a bio are encouraged. You do not have to be published. If you qualify, please email me at


#WW Stopping Guest Posts & New Line-Up

23 Sep

Since January of this year, I’ve featured a guest writer every Monday. I was hoping to continue this tradition for at least a year, but with the Christmas season approaching, I’ve been denying articles more than accepting articles (due to the submitted articles mainly being advertisements). That being said, I’ve been very fortunate that so many fantastic and talented writers wanted to write for, and I’ve enjoyed every article shared. I am undeniably grateful that I have been able to meet more writers, speak with them, and share their work. It has been one of my favorite parts of this past year, here on the blogosphere. So, first, a HUGE thank you goes out to all the guest bloggers I’ve featured this past year.

Now, the time has come for a change.


I’ve been thinking long and hard about what to turn Monday slots into, and I’ve only recently come to a decision. Next week will be my three-year blogging anniversary. (What? Can you believe it?) This means I have HUNDREDS of blog posts that many of you—especially newer subscribers—have probably never read or seen. In fact, many of my most popular blog posts to this day were posted in 2012, and when readers ask a certain writing question, I almost always have an old article I wrote that I could send them. These pieces mainly include writing tips and marketing tips, so I thought it would be fun to rewrite these posts, update them with new information (and tips), and share them on Mondays. So, if you have an old favorite and you want to hear an updated version, let me know in the comments below. I’ll even tag you as the reader who suggested it.

I hope you’ll enjoy these posts when they start. I am already organizing it now, and I’m looking forward to the change. Of course, I’ll make another announcement when it gets closer, but until then, I am accepting a few more guest posts for October/November, so if you want to be a guest blogger, now is the time to submit at I accept original posts about reading and writing, and you do not have to be published to submit. Best case scenario, if I have enough guest bloggers, I might even continue guest posts and rotate them with revamped posts.

Another option is just having a weekly post where I talk about what movies I’m watching, what music I’m listening to, and what I’m reading, but I figure I sort of do that on Facebook anyway. :)

Let me know your thoughts!


All three books in The Timely Death Trilogy are now available! The first book is even up for free. For those of you waiting for the paperback of Death Before Daylight, don’t panic! It releases on October 19. Speaking of October 19, you can expect my newsletter to go out then and from now on every month on the 19th.

Teaser from Death Before Daylight shared yesterday

Teaser from Death Before Daylight shared yesterday

On October 21, you can come see me at Headrush Coffee and Tea Roasters in Kansas City, Missouri for a paranormal talk and book signing.  It will be tons of fun!

Minutes Before Sunset: book 1

AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooksKoboGoodreads

Seconds Before Sunrise: book 2

 AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooksKoboGoodreads

Death Before Daylight: book 3

 AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooksKoboGoodreads

#MondayBlogs Cartoons Make You a Better Writer

21 Sep


I love cartoons, and I love comic books and manga, and I’m very open about my love for these things. That being said, cartoons and comic books and manga are often depicted as things for children…something I obviously disagree with. J There are many reasons to love cartoons, and today, author Grant Goodman gives us yet another reason to love them. It helps with your writing.

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in guest articles are those of the author/s and do not necessarily reflect my own. To show authenticity of the featured writer, articles are posted as provided (a.k.a. I do not edit them). However, the format may have changed.

Cartoons Make You a Better Writer by Grant Goodman

When I sat down to write the first Agent Darcy and Ninja Steve novel, what really drove me was my love of cartoons. I wanted to create—in written form—the cartoon series I always wanted to see.

I grew up with the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. I was glued to the sofa when they stormed the Technodrome to fight Shredder or when they teamed up with Casey Jones. Each episode had cool fight scenes, a sci-fi invention, and at least one funny line from Michelangelo. The turtles were my first obsession and they propelled me to join a martial arts school when I was in elementary school.


My elementary school mornings and weekends were filled with Tom and Jerry Kids, Inspector Gadget, X-Men, Spiderman, and Batman: The Animated Series. While most of them were in short story format, the X-Men, Spiderman, and Batman series began to introduce me to the idea that 30 minute cartoons could build a larger story. Spiderman had “The Alien Costume” arc, which gave Venom’s origin story over the course of three episodes. But that wasn’t quite enough. I wanted a longer storyline.

The first episode of Dragonball Z aired when I was in 6th grade and when I saw it, my head nearly exploded. A series in which nearly every episode built off of the last. A cast of characters who did martial arts AND threw fireballs. An entire universe of heroes and villains, legends and lore.

DBZ led me into the wide, wild catalog of Japanese animation that revealed an entire cultural art form that offered a great deal of respect to storytelling in animated form. I watched Vash the Stampede try everything he could do to avoid taking lives in Trigun, I saw Miyazaki’s phenomenal Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind, and I was completely swept away by Fullmetal Alchemist.

All of it—every episode of every series I ever watched—has somehow contributed to my abilities as a writer, and it will for you, too. You learn how to plot an action scene that matters, because you see plenty of them that don’t. You learn how to keep two characters pining for each other in order to build tension between them. You learn the importance of a cliffhanger to keep your audience hooked.

Most importantly, however, watching cartoons will teach you how to keep your imagination active, because without a strong imagination, you’re going to write something boring.

If you’re aspiring to write a MG or YA sci-fi/fantasy action series, my best advice to you is to watch cartoons. Lots of them. Go watch the first season of The Legend of Korra for a masterclass in serious-but-not-pitch-black YA storytelling. Seek out Samurai Jack for how to do fight scenes that flow.

This may be the only time anyone in your life tells you this: stop reading for a bit and start watching!

Grant GoodmanBio:

Grant Goodman is the author of the Agent Darcy and Ninja Steve novels, a series for readers anywhere between 9 and 900 years old. His YA lit blog, November Notebook, is for teens, adults, ghosts, robots, unicorns, dragons, and aliens. He teaches middle school English in Montgomery County, Maryland.

Want to be a guest blogger? Now is the time to submit. I will be stopping guest blog posts in November, but before then, I would love to have you on! I am accepting original posts that focus on reading and writing. Pictures, links, and a bio are encouraged. You do not have to be published. If you qualify, please email me at


#SATurday: Writing Update: Take Me Yesterday

12 Sep

I’m writing this blog post before I announce I’m working on Take Me Yesterday, book 2 of The Tomo Trilogy, but I’ve probably shown you a teaser by now. (This time warp I live in—two weeks before my life is posted—is still rather strange, but it is especially ironic in this case.)

For those of you who don’t know, my novel, Take Me Tomorrow, book 1 of The Tomo Trilogy, is a young adult dystopian novel about a clairvoyant drug. It released July 17, 2014, but it was taken off of the market less than six months later after that publisher closed. Now that I’m done rewriting November Snow, I’ve returned to The Tomo Trilogy with new insight, and I would like to experiment with that path next.

That being said, I’m basically writing this to ask you a few questions. Was there something you would’ve liked to see in Take Me Tomorrow? For instance, I am considering adding a few one-page chapters from Noah’s perspective, and I would like to hear your opinion on that. Originally, I kept the excerpts out because I thought he either said too much or too little, but so many of you expressed how you would’ve liked to see his voice, so I might add them. (But I warn you, his voice makes no sense, so please keep that in mind.) I’m also considering adding a few more details about the “massacre” that is mentioned, but there was an important reason I didn’t explain it in the first book. (It’s explained in book 2.) But I would love to hear any and all opinions if you have them.

That being said, working on Take Me Yesterday is different than I ever imagined. I’m basically rewriting it, too. The draft I had written is now five years old. FIVE. That shocked me enough. I’ve grown a lot as a writer since then, so I’m writing it with some older eyes, more experienced eyes, but that doesn’t mean it has been easy.


You see, there’s a reason I didn’t return to Take Me Tomorrow right away. When it first released, I thought maybe it was the wrong decision, that the story was too controversial, that the story might even be too close to home. To this day, Take Me Tomorrow is the closest work I’ve written to my life, and I don’t do that often, but the topics surrounding drugs is important to me. Considering my mother died of a drug overdose when I was eleven, I’ve been affected by drugs my whole life, and after my mother’s death, I did a lot of research regarding how drugs are handled in society, both illegal and legal, and Take Me Tomorrow was the result of all that research. (If you want more information, I wrote an article a while back that gets in-depth about my reasoning, Why I Write About Drugs, Immigration, and Addiction) But, when it comes down to it, Take Me Tomorrow is my expressing a lot of pain I’ve had in regards to drugs. I don’t think it’s black and white. I find drug-related topics to be very gray, and I tried to portray that in the first book.

Perhaps releasing it when I did wasn’t the right time, but it did open my eyes to what I might face. Like, the woman who emailed me and told me I was encouraging kids to fall in love with drug addicts by writing what I did. (True story.) But I think, I’ve come to a point in my writing career where I know, no matter what, that I need to be true to myself…and I think I’m ready to tackle this controversy again. Most of all, I think I’m simply ready to share the rest of Sophia’s story.

I hope you’ll enjoy it too,


P.S. For those of you wondering about November Snow, I still plan on releasing that next, and I’m hoping to announce something about it this fall/winter. Right now though, I’m just concentrating on getting The Timely Death Trilogy out before I worry about publication. Thank you for understanding!

Announcement time! And, boy, do I have a lot of announcements. (They’re exciting, I promise!)

Death Before Daylight, book 3 of The Timely Death Trilogy, releases in THREE days. Three! Pre-order your eBooks here: AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooks. (The paperback releases Oct. 19.) If you want to be a part of the release day, you can even sign up for a book blast by clicking here. And, if you haven’t started the trilogy yet, don’t worry. The first book is free everywhere. Here’s some links to get you started in the Dark: AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooks.

All three!

All three!

Death Before Daylight was even featured on Waiting on Wednesday,  a weekly post about what readers are waiting for. On top of that, we’ve had a lot of fun so far during the Seconds Before Sunrise blog tour, and as usual, you can visit any of these places to enter into a raffle to win great prizes! Here are the latest stops: Black Words-White Pages interview, Crazy Beautiful Reads Review, and Fic Gal Review.

As for events, UK fans, I will be doing an Author Takeover on Happily Ever After Seekers Book Club on Facebook tomorrow at 8 p.m. (UK), which is 3 p.m. (EST).

Another Facebook party is being thrown by Clean Teen Publishing on September 18 from 7-9 p.m. (EST) Come join us at the CTP Death Before Daylight Release Party.

And, finally, (OH! FINALLY!) I’ll be doing a Halloween book signing and paranormal talk at Headrush Roasters in Gladstone, Missouri on October 21 from 6-7:30 p.m. (CDT). Who else can’t wait?


#WW Writing in Limbo

9 Sep

This may be personal in regards to my writing life, but I’d be surprised if it were unique to me. During and right after a book release, it’s difficult for me to write. Not because I don’t want to, but because I end up spending hours upon hours on Luna-P (a.k.a. my lappy toppy) for interviews, guest posts, and social media in general (all of which I love, but it results in some sore eyes). So, for a little while after releases, I’m in a limbo period.

What is a limbo period?

Well, for me, it’s just Dante’s way of saying I’m in wait. I’m not writing right now; I’m simply waiting for the right time to write again. I’m resting, so to speak.

I’ve seen a few people call this writer’s block, but I want to clarify that it isn’t writer’s block, because I could write. (And, as you’ll see below when I talk about what I’ve been doing, you’ll see, in fact, I do write sometimes.) But it’s more like a mental vacation to regain energy and focus.

Maybe I’m the only one who does this…but I doubt it. We all need rest, after all, and I’m still productive during this limbo time.

Coffee and chocolate helps limbo too!

Coffee and chocolate helps limbo too!

What do I do during the limbo?

I mainly analyze where I’m at and where I want to go. Ex. What novel do I want to release next? What about books after that? What do I want to do differently with that novel? Covers? Events? Local events? Traveling?

I set goals, and I try to make them realistic, and I tell myself it’s okay if I don’t make them (but how cool would it be if I do?)

I’m currently in this writing limbo phase. Since Minutes Before Sunset and Seconds Before Sunrise have released during the past two months—not to mention Death Before Daylight releasing on September 15—I’ve basically been in limbo for a little while now. And I’ve been enjoying it. While I did complete the rewrite of November Snow—See? You can write during limbo—I have focused a lot of my energy on where I’m going next. For instance, I want to release November Snow next. Then, I think I’ll return to The Tomo Trilogy (good news for you Take Me Tomorrow fans!) In fact, I was analyzing the sequel, Take Me Yesterday, just other night. I also want to try to get more swag for readers and hold two to three local events this fall for the paranormal season. I think it’d also be nice to offer signed box sets of The Timely Death Trilogy this October. So, look out for that. I’ve even taken some time to think over my blogging plan, and I might talk about this more in the future, but I’ll probably be ending guest posts in November (so now is the time to submit at I plan on using the Monday slot for old posts (we’re talking two-year-old blog posts) that were really popular, but are in need of a rewrite.

I’m planning and plotting—and not just books—and I’m having a great time.

Limbo doesn’t have to be a scary place, or an unproductive place, or a place of worry. It can be saved. In fact, it can be looked forward to. It can even take you places.


Death Before Daylight, book 3 of The Timely Death Trilogy, releases in six days! That being said, the paperback has been moved to October 19, but I hope you all enjoy the last book of the trilogy! You can pre-order it here:  AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooks. (And, of course, the first book is free: AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooks.)


The latest teaser released

In other news, the Seconds Before Sunrise blog tour is underway. Most recently, we were on Just Amy for a spotlight, but I’ll share more interviews and such soon. If you want to participate in the release day blast for Death Before Daylight, sign up here.

On September 18, Clean Teen Publishing will be hosting an event on Facebook from 7-9 p.m. (EDT) to celebrate the release. I’ll be there and giving away a TON of Dark prizes, so feel free to join us by clicking here.

rp But there are more events to come! Keep an eye out.

Stay Dark,


#MondayBlogs: Things to Do When You’re Suffering from Writer’s Block

7 Sep


Writer’s block. Oh, horrid writer’s block! It’s such a common fear (and problem) with many writers, and today’s guest blogger, C.S. Wilde, tackles the topic fearlessly and humorously. 

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in guest articles are those of the author/s and do not necessarily reflect my own. To show authenticity of the featured writer, articles are posted as provided (a.k.a. I do not edit them). However, the format may have changed.

Things to Do When You’re Suffering from Writer’s Block by C.S. Wilde

You want to fill that blank page so bad, but the juice isn’t flowing.

Feels familiar?

We’ve all been there, but do not fret, fellow writer. There are many ways to turn your lack of inspiration into a ton of productivity!

Fun fact: You usually get writer’s block because you don’t know what to do or where to go with your story. Basically, your muse is telling you it needs time to figure things out.

By the way, muses can be very nasty. Mine in particular loves getting drunk and flying to Vegas every weekend, and she slept with my boyfriend once, so we don’t exactly get along.

Photo provided by C.S. Wilde

Photo provided by C.S. Wilde

Anyway, here’s Things to Do When You’re Suffering from Writer’s Block, or alternatively, What You Should Do When Your Muse Flies to Vegas and Sleeps with Your Boyfriend:

  • Write a new story. Can’t figure out what to do with your current manuscript? Start a new one! You might even find the answers to your old story’s problems inside your new one. *mind blown*
  • Outline your current project. This is usually done at the beginning, but don’t worry, you can definitely do it now. Write down a general description of your scenes/chapters from beginning to end. This will give you the big picture, and having the big picture will help you figure out what to do next.
  • Write a short-story. This is one of my favorites. It’s a fantastic way to gain experience points and perhaps earn some extra bucks.
  • Revise an old story. Maybe it’s time to work on that project left forgotten in the bottom-drawer. Plus, it’s always great to check your old stuff to see how much you’ve improved.
  • Start a blog about something you love. This one will feel absolutely great. An example: I love humor, but I’m not exactly Tina Fey, so I started a humor blog without high expectations, and it does surprisingly well!
  • Write to a friend. I get the craziest dialogues by texting with my BFF. One of our best exchanges: “I shall name my boobs Awesome and Nutcracker. Nut is clearly the badass of the duo.” To which she replied, “I’m naming mine Kim and Kanye.”
  • Engage in forums for writers. You can learn a LOT from fellow authors, and you can make awesome friends who will support you along the way. Here’s a good place to start.
  • Write an article and submit it to magazines. This is another way to add good and old fairy dust to your cv, and maybe earn some extra bucks (plus experience points). The Write Life is a great place to start, and here’s a list of 25 sites that pay for guest posts.
  • Draft a query letter, tagline, or blurb for your book. Seriously, that’s the hardest thing a writer can do. If you manage to go through THAT, you can surely get your story back on track.
  • Write your author bio. It’ll make you feel all fancy and stuff.

The possibilities are endless. And you know, stories are jealous little things. If you start looking elsewhere, they’ll go after your muse and bring her back by the hair. Caveman style.

Take that, Britney! Yes, my muse’s name is Britney.

Cheers and happy writing, everyone!

About C.S. Wilde:

C.S. Wilde is just another author, here to entertain people. She writes about fantastical worlds, love stories larger than life and epic battles. She also, quite obviously, sucks at writing an author bio. She finds it awkward that she must write this in the third person, and hopes you won’t notice.

She exists here, and twitters here.

Want to be a guest blogger? Now is the time to submit. I will be stopping guest blog posts in October/November, but before then, I would love to have you on! I am accepting original posts that focus on reading and writing. Pictures, links, and a bio are encouraged. You do not have to be published. If you qualify, please email me at



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