Tag Archives: banned books

#WW Website Wonders

27 Jan

 

Every month, I share all of the websites I come across that I find helpful, humorous, or just awesome. Below, you’ll find all of January’s Website Wonders categorized into Writing, Reading, Art, and Just Because.

If you enjoy these websites, be sure to follow me on Twitter because I share even more websites and photos like this there.

My favorite this month: Your 2016 Authorial Mandate Is Here: Be The Writer That You Are, Not The Writer Other People Want You To Be:

“Know who you are. Learn your process. Find your way. And don’t let anyone else define who you are as a creator, as an artist, as a writing writer who motherfucking writes.”

Writing:

Writing Generator: Don’t take this too seriously, but it’s a fun website. It can generate a first line, names, and more. Again, please don’t actually use this while writing, but I had a good time losing myself on it for a few minutes.

#Yodify Your Grammar: This was sent to me by Grammarly, and it’s absolutely hilarious!

50 Questions to Ask To Get To Know Someone: Okay. So this is a dating article. But this could be a great way to get to know your character.

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Reading:

What We Aren’t Talking About When We Talk About Feminism in YA: A VERY important discussion that needs to be read by all. “Why do find characters who wield a sword but have a soft side to be unbelievable? Why do they have to have masculine traits to be bought as powerful?”

Parents call cops on teens for distributing banned book: It’s an old one, but well worth reading again and again.

25 Best Far Future Sci-Fi Books: Do you love any of these you?

For Many: A poem worth watching unfold

Art:

Jesuso Ortiz Art: They are so cute.

12 Stunningly Real Sculptures: I loved the one with flying faces and books

You know…Just Because:

This Ancient Torture Technique is so Horrifying I Can’t Believe It’s Real: What? I’m a writer. We Google weird things.

These 13 Old Babies and Creepy AF and Not Cute at all: I laughed so hard at this article. Like stupidly hard.

Enjoy!

~SAT

Come get your books signed on February 13, from 1-3 PM! I’ll be one of several featured authors at a Barnes & Noble Valentine’s Day Romance Author Event in Wichita, Kansas at Bradley Fair. CTP author Tamara Granthamwill be there, as well as NY Times Bestselling and USA Today Bestselling author Candice Gilmer. (I’ll know the other three authors soon!) I’d love to see you! If you haven’t started The Timely Death Trilogy, don’t worry. Minutes Before Sunset, book 1, is free!

Minutes Before Sunset, book 1:

AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooksKoboGoodreads

Seconds Before Sunrisebook 2:

AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooksKoboGoodreads

Death Before Daylightbook 3:

AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooksKoboGoodreads

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You can read The Timely Death Trilogy on your new Kindle Fire! 

Clean Teen Publishing is giving one away. Enter here.

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December’s Website Wonders

23 Dec

A few days ago, I found out that Minutes Before Sunset hit #953 in Fantasy and #935 in Romance-Paranormal on Amazon. It’s very exciting to be in the top 1,000. Thank you for your support! I hope you’re enjoying the read this holiday season. 

Tis’ snowing here in Kansas land.

Tis’ snowing here in Kansas land.

Today is my half-birthday. I’m simply mentioning it because I LOVE half-birthdays, and I thought that I would celebrate today by sharing a bunch of exciting and helpful websites I’ve come across for readers and writers. (I always share them on my Author Facebook Page.)

I did this last month and randomly throughout the year, but I made the decision to share these articles at the end of every month. This is a little earlier than I’m planning, but I don’t want to interrupt the holiday season with the websites. The articles below are organized by Writing, Reading, and Articles to Spark the Imagination. I hope you enjoy them as much I did.

Writing:

The 20 Most Controversial Rules in the Grammar World: I would love to debate these.

Words of Wisdom: 101 Tips from the World’s Most Famous Authors: Very interesting to read. Creative tips, beginner tips, fiction tips, poetry, and more from Ernest HemingwayMark TwainAnton ChekhovOscar WildeE. B. White, and others.

Reading: 

100 Awesome Open Courses for Bibliophiles: Free courses over information about the history of books and manuscripts, linguistics, foreign literature, ancient texts and more.

These Stereotypes About Book Lovers are Absolutely True, and That’s a Good Thing: very cute list.

15 Timeless Observations from History’s Greatest Dystopian Novels: there’s a reason these novels challenge the way a reader looks at society.

25 Banned Books You Should Read Today

Articles to Spark the Imagination: 

20 Abandoned Places in the World: Imagine what happened here. Imagine what could happen here.

17 Mysteries Awaiting Explanations: Maybe your novel will be the explanation everyone is looking for.

Join me on FB!

Join me on FB!

And, just for fun, someone added a few of my quotes to QuoTelly.com – Best Quotes on the Planet.

Hope everyone is staying warm! 

~SAT

Censorship of Self-Published Authors or Something Else?

16 Oct

Many of you are probably aware of the major rule changes happening in novel companies, but, perhaps, some of you aren’t, so I’m writing about the rule changes in the hopes of both informing authors (especially self-published) and opening a forum where authors and readers can have a healthy debate over the issue.

So what’s happening?

As of a few days ago, companies like Amazon, KOBO, and WHSmith are deleting self-published books that are deemed inappropriate or simply deleting all self-published novels altogether. Here are a few articles:

WHSmith removing all self-published titles: to summarize what’s happening here, WHSmith has received many complaints of titles that are “inappropriate.” According to the summary on their webpage, it started with uncomfortable or taboo erotica, incest, and rape themed novels. Then it moved into all self-published titles shortly afterwards, promising to keep self-published novels once they’ve gone through a screening process that has yet to be fully defined. 

Upon doing more research, I found an interesting article by The Self-Publishing Revolution who talks both about WHSmith’s censorship and Amazon. Yes, Amazon is also removing titles. In short, this article discusses books that have simply been removed because they were flagged inappropriate while also asking, “What is inappropriate?” and pointing out that what might be offensive to some, could be completely acceptable to another, not to mention that some of these taboo topics, such as incest and rape, happen in real life. One author even goes on to say how his novel was removed simply because it had an orgy in his novel, which, again, happens in real life and isn’t considered inappropriate by many readers.

So I went to my Author Facebook Page, and I asked what you think of this censorship. Here were some of the answers:

Simone Lisbon: I guess that would depend on who gets to decide what constitutes ‘inappropriate content’. I smell 1st amendment issues all over this…

Zach Hitt: First of all, the U.S.’s concept of what “inappropriate” is seems quite…er, funny. I hate to do this, but to quote/paraphrase Miley Cyrus, “America is funny in what we think is wrong. Just last night, I was watching Breaking Bad. They were essentially teaching viewers how to make meth. Then, they soaked a dead body in acid and wheeled the pieces into the woods. Then, they blanked out “fuck” and “molly,” during my VMA performance.” I can’t say I am a fan of her music, but Cyrus has a point. At what point will the line be drawn?

Yvonne Cline Simpkins: The United States is supposed to be Land Of The Free, but nothing is free anyore not even our RIGHTS!!!!

What do I think? 

I’m not entirely sure. Although I don’t advocate incest or rape in novels, I have to admit that I FEEL like this is a violation of freedom of speech, which I do have a problem with, but it isn’t. It’s the company’s right to say they don’t want to advocate such topics. It becomes very unclear on what these companies will do when we discuss taboo topics, especially when they happen in real life. What if it’s a story like Speak? This famous novel shows how rape can affect an individual. Would self-published stories like this now be censored? Or will they allow novels with such topics if they are only written in a serious manner instead of an entertaining manner? What about taboo, self-published novels that have been very successful, like the dinosaur erotica that erupted? There’s also a question of different laws and cultures between countries. For instance, age of consent and drinking age is different in the US than the UK. Will novels that don’t follow rules for one country be unavailable in another? This is a very thin line these companies are walking on. 

I will be watching how these companies change as they release more information on their screening process and their expectations for novels.

Please comment below. Have you experienced any backlash because of these changes? What do you think? Do you think other companies will follow their lead? How do you think this will change the self-publishing industry and/or readers?

If you’re interested, there is a petition. But I’d suggest sending a letter to the CEO of these companies instead (or both.)

AEC Stellar's FB cover photo

AEC Stellar Publishing, Inc. FB cover photo

~SAT

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