Tag Archives: Candy Crush Saga

My Insecurities and How I Overcame Them

18 Feb

Before I start I have one article I would like everyone who plays Candy Crush Saga to consider. As many of you know I wrote, Why You Should Boycott King and Candy Crush Saga, less than a month ago, and now I have another reason to encourage it. Please read this: CandySwipe Open Letter to King regarding trademark. We cannot sit back and allow corporations to take over the little guy in any field, especially artistic ones. Thank you for taking a minute out of your day.

After my previous post about my mother’s death affecting my feelings about graduation, I received many heartfelt messages here and in my email. I cannot express how much I appreciate your encouragement and how you took a minute to share your personal story in order to help me. I am always blown away by how lovely everyone is. Thank you.

You are the single reason I decided I had to write this post today. 

Everyone has insecurities. It happens. It’s natural. We’re human, after all. And we live in a world that is often setting up expectations full of judgement. I am no different than anyone else. I have had my list of insecurities. I don’t normally do this, and I probably won’t do it again for a long time, but I thought I would share some facts about myself that I used to struggle with that I haven’t shared before. Again, this is in the hopes of helping others embrace themselves, especially those parts of you that you cannot change. 

1. My handwriting is horrible – seriously horrible. 

I was originally left-handed, but I now write with my right hand. Before this switch, my handwriting was normal. Now, I can’t even read it sometimes. I often get told I “write like a boy” – which, in itself, I now think is wrong.

But what’s the reason? When I was eleven, I was showing someone how to shoot a basketball in my morning gym class. That’s when I tripped, and my hand slammed into the floor. At the time, I didn’t know it, but I had broken my growth plate. When I told the school nurse I was hurt, they sent me back to class because they thought I was trying to skip a math test. I didn’t go to the hospital until nine that evening. Consequensly, I did permanent damage, and my right arm is now significantly longer than my left arm. Instead of handwriting, I definitely type everything up. But I’m not mad about the situation. The nurse was doing her job, and things happen. Mistakes happen. I embrace it. I learned how to write with my right hand, I use black, G-2 pens to cheer myself up (because those pens are lovely) and I often show off my shorter arm as a party joke. When it hurts, (because it often hurts), I remind myself that I can always exercise it to make it stronger. I also remind myself that there are people who don’t have hands at all. I am lucky that I can still type with it, that I still have it, and knowing how lucky I am has allowed me to stay positive about physical therapy with my hand and overall arm strength.

2. I have bad depth perception.

This is me, and I love being me.

This is me, and I love being me. I also love putting my hair on top of my head like a bird nest.

Believe it or not, my eyes are totally different sizes. It’s true, and before you think this is normal, it is significant (although most cannot tell until I point it out.) I actually have depth perception problems from it, which I was diagnosed with my freshman year in college. They have to test my eyes every time I get a driver’s license renewed. Perhaps this is why I’m so clumsy. (I hit everything.) But I can laugh at myself. Learning to laugh at myself is pretty easy and quite enjoyable. I cannot change the size of my eyes or how I physically see the world, but I can change how I mentally see the world. I can have a positive attitude about the world.

3. I talk funny. (I say “funny” because it often makes people laugh.) 

I was born in Allentown, Pennsylvania. By the time I was fifteen, I had also lived in Oklahoma, Wisconsin, Georgia, Kansas, and Missouri. This has caused some confusion in my speech patterns and idioms, often causing me to stutter. I have a lot of things backwards, and my accents come out together – at the same time, I can sound like a southern belle that once lived in Canada (mainly because my father lived in Canada, and I’ve picked up his phrases as well as the ones I received from Green Bay, Wisconsin.) Saying “turn on the garburator” at a party isn’t understood at an American house-warming party, but I sure love explaining it. Those moments that I have to take time to explain what I am saying have now become moments that allow me to explain my background and how it has shaped me into the individual that I am today. And I love who I am today, stuttering or not.

4. My eyebrows are REALLY far apart

I’ve even had someone email me this statement before, like they thought they were helping me from over tweezing. Believe it or not, I was born that way, and I know my left eyebrow sits halfway over my eye. I got the look from my grandfather, and you know what? My grandfather was a pretty awesome person. So good for my spaced out eyebrows. They show off my family history. They show off the genes that also make me who I am. They remind me of family.

5. I am really pale, and I don’t tan…or burn.

I swear. I went to Puerto Rico, barely used sunscreen, and nothing happened. I just don’t’ react – although I can admit that I got extremely burned once in my life. (And that was not fun!) When I was a teenager, I hated how pale I was because it was “cool” to be tan, and everyone thought I stayed inside all of the time. (Which I do now.) But you know what? I like my skin. I like how pale I am because it is me. I don’t care if I glow under black lights. I like who I am, and – again – it’s my Welsh roots. It’s also something I share with my late mother (as well as my crazy, curly hair that I used to hide because straight hair was “cool.”) I should be proud, and I am. Just for clarification reasons, because I do not want this to be taken the wrong way: I have nothing against being tan or any other color for that matter. This is simply me embracing who I am. I am not, in any way, trying to encourage others to be pale like me. Physical appearances do not matter, and that is the ultimate point. 

Now that I shared a few of my previous insecurities, I wanted to add one thing:

I am genuinely a happy person, but there are days that I regress, and that’s okay. I look at insecurities the same way. Even after overcoming them, you might have an insecure moment or two or hundreds over a lifetime, but that’s okay. Just try to remember what’s really important – and that’s what’s on the INSIDE and what resides in your ACTIONS. 

I could can cry about my eyebrows or I can learn how to make them do the wave and laugh at my goofy expressions. I can complain about my injuries like my left hand, but I can also remember that I have other parts of my body that work just fine that others might not even have. A doctor can give me plastic surgery on my body, but only I can change my mind and my heart. And your mind and your heart will guide you, aid you, and embrace you.

No matter what, you can love yourself, and love overcomes everything else.

P.S. I’m still accepting reviewers of Seconds Before Sunrise (book 2 of The Timely Death Trilogy.) If you’re interested in reading my novels, please send me an email at shannonathompson@aol.com. I would love to hear from you. The first one is also on sale for only $3.89, and I would be more than happy to hear your thoughts.

~SAT

Click here because it’s fun to click on things. Isn’t it?

Click here because it’s fun to click on things. Isn’t it?

Why You Should Boycott King and Candy Crush Saga

25 Jan

Two days ago, I logged onto Facebook when fellow author, Victoria Perkins, shared this article: King ARE Trying to Candy-Crush The Banner Saga. I recommend reading that article – as well as the others I link below – as you read this, but I will try to explain my argument (and why this can affect other art industries) as if the links are broken. I also want to recommend looking up the differences of patents, trademarks, and copyrights if you’re not already familiar with them.

Okay. Here we go:

If you don’t already know, King is the company that owns Candy Crush Saga, and they have filed with the United States Patent and Trademark office for the words “candy” and “saga.” Before you think it will be impossible to pass this, The Banner Saga sequel – a video game based on Norse mythology – has already been blocked. Of course King claims that this trademark will not be enforced against all uses, but they are claiming they were trademarking “saga” because The Banner Saga by Stoic was getting money because of gamers’ confusion. I find this hard to believe. Gamers can read; they can also see. I’m pretty sure no one would mistake a group of Vikings for a candy, puzzle game.

So, why did King actually file this and what does it means for all industries?

King is a LARGE company with millions behind it. In fact, they are said to take in half of a million per day. Stoic – the owner of The Banner Saga – isn’t. It’s an Indie company that King has claimed they aren’t threatened by. If King isn’t threatened by Stoic, then why is King trying to take away Stoic’s abilities to use the title? Because King is trying to monopolize the market while also preventing other artists from rising. I don’t think it’s out of the realm of possibility that other, large companies might follow suit if this is successful. Filmmakers might trademark single-word titles. Publishers might be next. Think about it: they can afford to trademark and to protect that trademark with lawyers without batting an eyelash. Most Indie artists cannot afford a lawsuit, and large companies will rely on that. If this was successful, it could potentially ruin the independent artist.

Now, I have two things I want to clarify:

1.   I don’t think it will pass – but I don’t think that’s reason enough to be submissive about it and not speak out. We must let these companies know how much we disagree with their actions.

2.  I don’t like the repetitive, monopolized culture any more than the next artist – we’ve all seen it. We go to the bookstore one week after the “City of Bones” movie releases and all of a sudden every other novel has “city” or “bones” in the title. Trademarking words to a singular game or book might prevent this, but I don’t think companies or artists should do this. Instead, I wish artists and their companies would refuse to jump onto the trend’s train, stand out on their own, and be confident in their abilities instead of trying to mooch off of someone else’s popularity.

Getting a trademark on a word for any reason is not only wrong, it is also destructive, and it is destructive for everyone – gamers, writers, photographers, etc. If it happens because we were sitting back, this will become the Pandora’s box of trademarks, waiting to freeze future projects.

So what can we do to make sure we’re stopping this? 

We can contact King and ask them to stop, boycott their games, and/or spread the word to others, especially those who play their games. We can also support Stoic as well as other independent artists. Even though there is a small chance these things will pass, I still think we need to show how we will not support these corporations as they try to smother the independent artist. Please consider these three things carefully. I know I will be doing all of them.

I asked what you thought on my Facebook author page, and Raymond E. Feist, the New York Times and  Times of London bestselling author, explained a lot of important information:

Join me on Facebook, and your answers might be used next!

Join me on Facebook, and your answers might be used next!

“Trademarks are different critter than copyrights, but people often confuse the two. The short answer for a very complex question is the can trademark “Candy Crush Saga” and the distinctive type design, and any attached artwork. It’s narrow and specific and doesn’t percent people from using candy, crush, or saga in other trademarks. If it did, they couldn’t trademark crush because of Orange Crush soda and how many candies are out there besides See’s? That being said, they are likely to lose their opposition on Banner Saga unless they can clearly show confusion in the marketplace due to similarities in type design, art, etc. the only reason they’ll get a hearing on this if they do is both are gaming products. If it were Saga Outerwear (real company making outdoor gear) or Saga Music (another real company) they’d have their opposition tossed. My bet is the Patent Office will kick the complaint.”

So what do you think? Are you planning on boycotting and/or messaging King?

~SAT

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