Tag Archives: David Nicholls

#Saturdate The Danish Girl, An Outline, Cat Socks, and Raven Boys

2 Jan

Happy New Year! I know we’re only two days into 2016, but I hope the New Year is already off to a great start. I’m really looking forward to what 2016 brings. This year, so far, I have two book releases planned, a possible signing at B&N, and a signing in St. Louis in the fall. I hope I can add to that as the year progresses! My overall writing goals include working on The Tomo Trilogy and another, brand-new, never-be-seen trilogy I have yet to talk about openly. The first book is written, but in need of a rewrite. Who knows? Maybe I’ll even find a way to get those out sooner to you rather than later. 😉  Either way, I’m looking forward to 2016, and I hope you are too!

What I’m Writing:

I’ve actually been working really hard on Take Me Yesterday, book 2 of The Tomo Trilogy. After reviewing Take Me Tomorrow, I realized some major mistakes throughout the second book, so I’ve been re-outlining to get a better, more precise plot. (This sounds much nicer than it actually is. It involved a lot of self-loathing and staring at the wall and waded up papers and empty pens.) Ironically, I actually sold my very last copy of Take Me Tomorrow, so the world does seem to be telling me I must finish this trilogy next. We will see.

What I’m Publishing:

Whew! I finished the second round of edits for Bad Bloods, so now we have proofreaders going over it. I also sent out a newsletter asking for help during the cover reveal on January 6, so that’s exciting! (I can’t believe that’s happening in less than a week.) The winning #1lineWed preview can be read below. This week’s theme was friendship. (And while my tweet was short, I actually cut out a lot of the scene to fit it on Twitter, so this isn’t exactly what you’ll read in the book. I would give you the full scene, but it might spoil a major section. But, fun fact, Jane—to this day—is one of my favorite characters from any of my works.)

“A political friendship.”

“Friendship should never be political.”

“My dear,” Jane squeezed my hand, “Everything is political.”

Visit the Facebook, Pinterest, and the Extras page.

What I’m Reading:

12402069_958788567501658_8537463732066083469_oI began my first read of 2016! See How They Run by Ally Carter is the second book in the Embassy Row series and highly recommended. (Love her.)

I started and finished The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater, so yeah! I’ve started my 2016 Goodreads Reading Challenge. You can read my five-star review by clicking here. I recommend it to fans of mystery books, treasure hunts, the paranormal, humor, and Welsh mythology. Light romance readers will still enjoy the tension.

I finished The Kiss of Deception by Mary E. Pearson, and I loved it! I gave it four stars, and you can read my review here, but I recommend it to lovers of romance, especially when runaway princesses are involved. This is a VERY light “high” fantasy, but I am looking forward to seeing how the characters grow in the sequel.

What I’m Listening To:

Sights by London Grammar. Listen to it. Listen.

What I’m Watching:

UnknownSo…I went a little crazy this week and watched a lot of movies. (What can I say? Silver AMC passes are great Christmas gifts during the Oscar season.)

The Danish Girl made me an emotional wreck. I highly recommend it. The movie—based on a true story that I also recommend reading (because there are some movie differences)—is brave, immortal, and a depiction of a sort of rare love, a never-ending type. The entire story was heart wrenching.

The Hateful Eight wasn’t my favorite Quentin Tarantino movie, but I will say this: I love that he was brave enough to tackle to taboo of violence against women in film. (Because, to me, that was what the movie was about.) Why? Because, generally, male characters face violence, while female characters only face sexual violence. (Which I’m freakin’ sick of. If I could go the rest of my life without a rape scene in a movie, that would be great. K, thanks.) I was quite relieved to see that Quentin doesn’t follow that “standard.” He sticks by just violence, treating her like any other character, and he also does it in a static form. (The whole movie practically takes place in one room, which is impressive.) The other parts that blew me away were the monologues. His dialogue was on point. But the overall story just wasn’t as exciting for me as his other films. Still recommended, of course.

I rented one. Love, Rosie reminded me of one of my favorite book/movies of all time. (One Day by David Nicholls), except Love, Rosie is the sweet and charming version. So, obviously, I loved this movie. I have the biggest crush on Lily Collins, which is why it’s so surprising I haven’t seen this movie yet, but I’m definitely going to watch it again. Recommended to those who love cheese.

And I managed to sort of binge-watch Making a Murderer. Worth it! It’s an awesome documentary series about a twisted trial.

movies

What I’m Baking, Making, and Drinking:

I made chocolate chip cookies and chocolate mousse this week. Both of which turned out OKAY, but I’m learning. 😉

What I’m Wearing:

Cat socks. I got brand-new cat socks. This is a big deal.

What I’m Wanting:

enhanced-29836-1449080491-1So…I work at home and write at home and basically never leave my house. It’s natural that I would want all of these items from this list on Buzzfeed: 25 Delightfully Cozy Gifts For Anyone Who Hates Leaving the Home. But the coffee mug is perfection.

What I’m Dreaming Of:

My dad, sister-in-law, my roommate, and me were caught in a storm and had to rent out this creepy old church turned into a bed-and-breakfast. Bogart, my cat, was there, and at one point, he got spooked, so he ran into the bathroom. We were all cracking up…until he came sprinting out of the bathroom and the door slammed shut behind him.

What Else Is Going On:

The cover reveal is THIS Wednesday! Get excited!

~SAT

10 Cry-Worthy Books From My College Years

8 Sep

Announcements: 

Take Me Tomorrow now has a book trailer, which I hope you’ll take a minute to watch, like, and share before you read today’s post! Thank you.

10 Cry-Worthy Books From My College Years

After I wrote Books That Changed My Childhood, I received a few emails asking me about my other novels, so I am going to continue sharing different types of reads that have affected my life. I’m also adding my favorite quotes! I’ll be honest. I started writing a list of novels that affected my high school years, but it got out of control, so I moved onto my college time only to realize most of the books did, in fact, make me cry.

Yes. That was a warning.

Most – if not all of these – made me cry. And if you’ve never cried at a novel, I recommend these because everyone should cry at a novel at least once in their reading lives.

cry

1. The Art of Racing the Rain by Garth Stein – Yes, this novel is told from a dog’s perspective. And yes, you can take a dog seriously. (If you think you can’t, trust me when I say you must read this book.) A friend recommended this novel to me, and I was hesitant when I picked it up in the bookstore. To my surprise, I read it in one sitting, even when my vision got blurry.

“Here’s why I will be a good person. Because I listen. I cannot talk, so I listen very well.”

2. Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro – If you’ve ever though that first-person can’t be taken seriously, then, Ishiguro is here to prove you wrong. There are no other words to describe his prose in this novel. You will begin at childhood and grow into an adult, just like you did in real life. It will remind me of how you learned in life, and it will tear you apart.

“All children have to be deceived if they are to grow up without trauma.”

3. The Unmemntioable by Erin Moure – Arguably one my favorite poetry collections if not my favorite. (I can never decide which one is my favorite.) I first read this in my poetry class at the University of Kansas, and I have continued to read it over and over ever since. The exploration of language, history, relationships, and identity is more than enough to cause emotional reflections.

“When there was no one left, it became nowhere. There were no more letters after the w.”

4. American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang – Cry-worthy? Debatable. But the emotions are just as strong. The awe could possibly bring tears to your eyes. They sure choked me up. But I mainly added this because it’s the perfect example of a graphic novel that proves all graphic novels can be taken seriously.

“It’s easy to become anything you wish . . . so long as you’re willing to forfeit your soul.”

5. When The Emperor Was Divine by Julie Otsuka – This novel has never left me, perhaps because Otsuka never gives names to her characters. She forces you to become them, delicately and masterfully, before she explores Japanese concentration camps in the United States. This is one of those stories I lent out to someone and deeply regretted it when I didn’t get it back. I will have this book on my shelf again one day.

“He wondered if you could see the same moon in Lordsburg, or London, or even China, where all the men wore little black slippers, and he decided that you could, depending on the clouds. ‘Same moon,’ he whispered to himself, ‘same moon.'”

 6. Breath, Eyes, Memory by Edwidge Danticat – Not for the light-hearted. I first read this memoir after the earthquake in Haiti. I wish I could say more about it, but I fear that I would take away from the exploration of culture and identity if I did.

“Love is like the rain. It comes in a drizzle sometimes. Then it starts pouring, and if you’re not careful, it will drown you.”

 7. A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah – Again, not for the light-hearted. This is a memoir of a child solider, and it is also one of my favorite books. Right when you think you can handle his prose, he reminds you of his age, and you are torn apart, but you keep reading because his voice coaxes you to.

“We must strive to be like the moon.”

 8. One Day by David Nicholls – Maybe the emotions in this novel are a little too close to reality? Meet Dex and Em, two friends who continue to meet on the same day every year for…oh, you know, their whole lives. A definite reminder of how time passes, how much can happen, and how we change because of it all.

“You can live your whole life not realizing that what you’re looking for is right in front of you.”

9. Aimless Love by Billy Collins – Another poetry collection, but this is technically a few of his collections together. If you’re hesitant about poetry, I definitely recommend Collins because he is easy to slip into but complicated over time. You might not cry, but you might have to take a moment to feel like crying after reading a few of his poems.

“No wonder the moon in the window seems to have drifted

out of a love poem that you used to know by heart.”

 10. On the Road by Jack Kerouac – Yes. I just admitted this. I cried when I read On the Road. I’m not sure why since it’s not necessarily a “sad” novel, but it was for me. The exploration and exploitation of Dean really brought the sadness out in me. I would get more into detail about how I feel about Dean and the other characters – which were definitely based off of real people – but I don’t want to spoil the story. On the Road is more than just a recount of drugs and sex in the Beat Generation. It’s forcing life when faced with living like you’re already dead.

“…the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars.”

Oh, just an extra. Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer. I only debated this novel because I technically read it when I was fourteen, but I reread it later on, and I cried. Again. And at the theatre when I saw the adaptation. And when I got home and read it again. And again when I forced my friend to watch the movie.

I don’t purposely read novels that are turned into movies, but it might be interesting to note that these are also movie adaptations now: Never Let Me Go (I cried) and One Day (I almost cried.) On the Road (Okay. So I didn’t cry at this one. But the feels!)

So what novels or poems have brought tears to your eyes? Why? Share them below, and let’s have a cry fest! (A happy, artistic one, of course.) I’ll bring the tissues.

~SAT

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