Tag Archives: future

#WW My Next Publication: Two Books, Release Dates, and More.

11 Nov

Last week, I announced that I signed November Snow with Clean Teen Publishing, and as promised, I’m releasing additional information today. The original version of November Snow that was published in 2007 was 600 pages. That being said, the rewrite is actually longer than the original, so Clean Teen Publishing has split November Snow into a two-part series (and the split is awesome). That means November Snow is getting a new title. As of today, both books will be titled Bad Bloodswith part one’s subtitle being November Rain and part two’s subtitle holding the original title November Snow. For readers of the first version, November Rain will cover November 1, 2089 – November 10, 2089, and it’ll be around 60,000 words, while the second part will be around 80,000 words. (See? The book was really long, too long to be published as one.) I’m really looking forward to seeing November Snow transform, and I hope you are too! November Rain already has a release date too! November Rain is set for release on July 18, 2016. The eBook of November Snow will release one week later, but the paperback of the sequel will release that November. You will find the series synopsis below, and I’ll be releasing each individual synopsis within the next week (probably on my next Saturday post) . . . but if you follow the individual links, you can read them now. 😉

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If I can be perfectly honest, November Snow is the closest to my heart in regards to my own writings. The original version was written shortly after my mother suddenly died at the age of 44. I was 11. She was always encouraging my love for reading and writing, and when she died, a part of me was lost forever. I’ve kept that part of me (her, really) alive by writing. November Snow was that first step, that single promise, to make the most of my life and to make her proud.

That being said, the original publication wasn’t very professional. It was thrown together, unedited, and had very little oversight, other than from a 16-year-old girl with a dream (cough, cough, me). I could’ve used more supervision eight years ago, but alas, that wasn’t how my first publishing experience went. Because of that, November Snow has been off the market for years—almost the entire time since it’s original release—and I’m eternally grateful Clean Teen Publishing is giving me a second chance with my first book, a second chance at making my mom proud, a second chance at beginning again.

This truly is a gift.

And…of course…for those looking for more information…here’s a short synopsis for the two-part series, and some places with extra information. If you have any questions, let me know, and I’ll do my best to answer them!

thumbnail90Series Synopsis:

Seventeen-year-old Serena isn’t human. She is a bad blood, and in the city of Vendona, bad bloods are executed. In the last moments before she faces imminent death, a prison guard aids her escape. Back on the streets determined to destroy her kind, Serena meets a fellow bad blood, a boy named Daniel, and his past with his brothers is as equally mysterious as her connection to them. Unbeknownst to the two, this connection is the key to winning an election for bad bloods’ rights to be seen as human again. But Serena is the only one who can secure Vendona’s vote.

When the two unite, their accidental relationship becomes the catalyst for a twelve-year war to continue. Exposing the twisted past of a corrupt city, Daniel, Serena, and every bad blood they know will come together to fight and win, but very few of them will survive to see the day. Bad blood or human, a city will burn, and all will be united by catastrophic secrets and irrevocable tragedy.

Bad Bloods on: Facebook, Pinterest, and my Extras page.

Older articles relating to Bad Bloods (keep in mind, it’ll be referred to as November Snow):

Writing With Barbie

What I’ve Learned Rewriting a Seven-Year-Old Novel

This is an awesome question about bad bloods from Twitter’s @SiameseMayhem. She asked this when I was still writing it, so that’s why we’re talking about publication.

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~SAT

P.S. I wanted to give a shout out to Instagram’s lovely @bookprints for this wonderful post.

“I badly wanted a printed copy of Take Me Tomorrow by Shannon A. Thompson since I’ve read it as an ebook and I finally have one (signed!)!

Thanks @shannonathompson for making this happen and for the lovely note! There was also a signed ‪#‎bookmark‬ of the first book in The Timely Death Trilogy with it!

Please, go check this author out and give her books the love they definitely deserve!

One happy booknerd over here!”

safe_image.phpDuring my next newsletter, you might be receiving a Black Friday Sale for Seconds Before Sunrise book 2 in The Timely Death Trilogy, so be sure to sign up here, but if you need a head start on the first book and you just can’t wait for the others…

Minutes Before Sunset: book 1 (FREE)

AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooksKoboGoodreads

Seconds Before Sunrise: book 2

AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooksKoboGoodreads

Death Before Daylight: book 3

AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooksKoboGoodreads

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Website Wonders

28 Oct

Announcements: 

If you’ve always wanted to know just a little bit more about Take Me Tomorrow, Confessions of a Book Blogger reviewed the novel with slight spoilers (but nothing major!) And you can read why she said, “this book is practically perfection.” by clicking here to read her full review. I hope you check out Take Me Tomorrow!

Also, another review of Take Me Tomorrow is available on ATROX. Here is a sneak peek, “This book has lifted my spirits about dystopian books because this was fresh and original. If your a dystopian lover or you just love adventure, this book is definitely for you.”

Website Wonders:

Every month, I share all of the websites I come across that I find helpful, humorous, or just awesome. Below, you’ll find all of October’s Website Wonders categorized as so: Halloween-Themed, Reading, Writing, and Just For Fun. Between each category is a photo. If you enjoy these websites, be sure to like my Facebook page because I share even more websites and photos like this there.

Enjoy!

Halloween Themed:

50 Scariest Books of All Time: You might have heard of Stephen King. He’s on this list.

Creepiest Literary Haunts Around the U.S.: Looking to travel?

18 Literary Pumpkins For a Bookish Halloween: Anyone carve one of these delightful pumpkins this year?

10632874_619494601504909_7679906442351708623_n Reading:

The Mortal Instruments to Return as T.V. Series: I know. I know this is T.V., but it’s one of my favorite YA series, so I am beyond ecstatic that they didn’t drop it completely. Holding out hope that it will be amazing.

Amusing Ourselves to Death: Huxley vs. Orwell: I am a huge Orwell fan, so this cracked me up.

Poetry Day: 10 British Actors Read 10 British Poems: I know the poets out there will love this.

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Writing:

Writing: How-Tos and Resources: The amount of information on this website is unreal.

There’s a Word for That: 25 Expressions You Should Have in Your Vocabulary: Nefelibata – cloud walker: one who lives in the clouds of their own imagination or dreams, or one who does not obey the conventions of society, literature, or art.

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Just For Fun:

Shiritori Game: a word game for all

How to be a nerd and why that is awesome: The defining characteristic that ties us all together is that we love things.

The 18 Most Suppressed Inventions Ever: I talked about how the drug in Take Me Tomorrow is not the only time society has created something to see into the future. Read this article and check out the Chronovisor

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Enjoy website hunting!

~SAT

Writing Tips: Mother’s Day & Childhood Inspiration

12 May

Now, I have to admit that I’m unsure if this qualifies as “writing tips” or not, but I can’t seem to think of another way to explain it other than to explain recent events in my life and how I got to this decision to post about this.

On Friday night, I was driving home when I was hit by a drunk driver. Everyone was physically fine, but these moments often make you take a step back and wonder “what if?” or simply reflect on life. It’s also Mother’s Day, and, as many of you know, my mother passed away in 2003, so there’s been a lot of personal reflection happening for me over the past few days, and I wanted to share my thoughts on how reflecting can help your passionate spark if you feel as if it’s about to die.

Happy Mother's Day. This is Halloween, 1992, with my mother, my brother, and I. I was a ghost :] Probably perfect considering my paleness.

Happy Mother’s Day. This is Halloween, 1992, with my mother, my brother, and I. I was a ghost :] Probably perfect considering my paleness.

But, first, If you want something short and sweet, I posted this on my Twitter, and many followers found it comforting. “Do you sometimes feel like chasing your artistic dream is hard? This will cheer you up: click here.” 

Now–the bigger reflection: I’ve had more experiences in this sort of stuff than I’d like to admit to myself, but they always cause me to look back, and my childhood is often where I end up. I cannot say why this is other than it’s caused by a “flashback” sort of a thing. I begin thinking about what I’m grateful for, who I love, what I love, and everything that moves me from one day to another. But I’m going to concentrate on writing, because I want to stay in the “writing tips” as much as I possibly can.

So what in my childhood moved me forward into writing? (And many of you already know about my mother’s death being the biggest moment when I was pushed forward into taking it seriously, so, again, I’m going to talk about something else, although that is essential.)

Favorite Books:

I think this can be very important to remember, but, even more so, to return to every piece once in a while and read. Include first books, middle school reads, and beyond. On days where you’re feeling down, especially about writing, returning to these texts can spark your passion again, easily and without any strenuous effort. All you have to do is read, and you might be amazed at how quickly you’ll return to your timeless love for language, even if the original texts are simple and/or wouldn’t spark interest today if you hadn’t read it before.

Mine, as an example, includes childhood novels about Nancy Drew and Scooby Doo, young-adult series by Meg Cabot or Lynne Ewing (specifically Daughters of the Moon), and adult novels, generally memoirs like Mop Men, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, or A Long Way Gone. I can even return to literature I loved in school, my favorite being The Stranger.

As a comedic picture: this is me, shocked by novels, at 3 years old, and my great-grandmother quite thrown off by my craziness.

As a comedic picture: this is me, shocked by novels, at 3 years old, and my great-grandmother quite thrown off by my craziness.

Favorite Writing Experiences: 

These moments can bring back the original moments that brought you the utmost happiness before other moments brought you down. You can return yourself, especially to childhood, when you first started writing and you didn’t have the stresses of publication or critiques. These memories, although little, are very powerful.

My personal example? In second grade, my short story about my two dogs, Milo and Max, won the class writing competition, and I got to read it to the class. I still have it, and the drawings and wording often makes me giggle, but it also lightens my writing soul. I go right back to that podium, when I was fearless, and I feel it transition to today’s time.

Others who inspired:

Think beyond the top five people who inspire you today. Try to recall the first few who you may not remember on a regular basis but know that they linger somewhere in your artistic past (meaning they’re also in your artistic self today.) Most of the time, you might remember one, but then you’ll remember more and more, and you’ll soon have a list of small instances that led to your wonderful path you’re on today.

My personal example here is my fifth grade teacher, Mrs. Metcalf. She was the first teacher to pull me aside and encourage my writing. When I was first writing back then, I was started my stories off with “Hi. I’m Henry, and this is my story…” and she taught me to start in the middle of action. I wrote her a story for Thanksgiving Break, and it started with a turkey running wild through a grocery store. Looking back on it, it was cheesy and poorly written, but she returned, having read the entire twenty pages, and encouraged me more and more, teaching me what else I could do in order to enhance my words. I was nine at the time, yet her teaching lingers today, and I’m grateful to have had such a wonderful teacher in my life at such a young age.

My hope is that you may take a moment today (or any day) to reflect on the moments that have brought you here today and remember never to give up on your dreams! It may seem cheesy, but it is, ultimately, very true, and I’m sure many of you know this, but many also have fleeting moments of doubt, and we can prevent these by reminding ourselves of what matters: life, love, and passionate dreams.

I always tell myself to write with passion; succeed with self-discipline. 

This is my personal philosophy, but I’d love to hear yours as well. Share below and spread the dream to others who may be struggling at this very moment in time (whether they read this today or two years from now.) Words are timeless. Let’s use that to embrace the love of art.

Have a great and meaningful day 😀

~SAT

P.S. Goodreads Quote of the day:

I leaned against the desk, ran my hand over my father’s paperwork, and picked up a pen. Turning around, I shoved it into my father’s hand.
“What’s this?” he asked, raising a brow.
“You’ll need it to sign my death certificate,” I said, pain vibrating my veins against my muscles and bones. “Are we done now?”

Eric, Minutes Before Sunset

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