Tag Archives: author friends

#WW Deciding To Change My Writing Plan

2 Sep

Writing is a business. It’s an investment of time, care, and love. (Love definitely makes it easier, anyway.) And all of this means that a writer must have a business plan, a plan that includes goals and direction and the ability to change at a moment’s notice if need be. That being said, every writer is different, which means every plan is different. I, myself, have an outline that varies from one writer friend to the next, but having a goal helps fine-tune my focus. That being said, I cannot do it on my own, so I’m often asking my fellow writer friends (and trusted friends outside of publishing) for their opinion on a change I’m contemplating.

Photo on 8-12-15 at 1.48 PM

Recently, for instance, I’ve been studying a major part of my marketing plan, particularly my author bio. For a long time, practically my entire career, I began it with my age. Literal quote? “Shannon A. Thompson is a 24-year-old author, avid reader, and habitual chatterbox…” Why did I do this? Well, it all goes back to the beginning. I was sixteen when my first novel released, and my age often worked against me. (Don’t get me wrong. I completely understand. In fact, my first novel was so poorly edited, I wouldn’t want someone picking that up first and judging me today based off of it…which is exactly why it’s unavailable.) That being said, I continued to share my age when I returned to publishing at the age of 21. Why? I could blame my baby face. Quite a few readers—when I didn’t state my age up front—would message me and ask, probably for the same reasons stated above, so I began my bio for clarification. This happened both out of necessity and a bit out of my own insecurity. Now that I’m older, and I have a few more works out to stand upon, I have changed it. I no longer feel like I have to say I started at 16 and I’m currently 24. I feel like my work is enough, that I’m enough without a number defining who I am, and it’s a good feeling to have, one I’ve never truly experienced before. But it does change my marketing. It affects everything, really, and I look forward to seeing how this curve in my path directs me to new areas. We shall see.

It helps to have friends encouraging me along the way.

Keep them in mind when considering changes in your marketing and publishing plans. They might help you in more ways than you think.

~SAT

teaser1Since Death Before Daylight releases on September 15, I released the first book teaser yesterday during #TeaserTuesday! You can pre-order the last book of The Timely Death Trilogy on  AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooks, and basically everywhere where books are sold. You can also sign up for a release day blast by clicking here

If you haven’t started the trilogy, don’t worry. The first book, Minutes Before Sunset, is free! (AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooks.) The sequel is out too. In fact, we’ll be celebrating the sequel, Seconds Before Sunrise, September 7-18 during the blog tour.

In other news, I’m stopping guest posts in October/November, so if you want to be a guest blogger, now is the time to submit. I’ll try to get everyone I can out before I change the posting dates again. I accept all original posts about writing and reading. You do not have to be publishing to qualify. Email me at shannonathompson@aol.com if you’re interested.

#WW: The Lonely Writer

14 Jan

#WW: The Lonely Writer

Writing can be lonely. The career often demands hours of solitude – aside from our characters – and while our characters can be very real to us, there are still those days where a living, breathing human being might be nice to talk to. Most of the time, this urge only comes to me when I can’t find the strength to face my characters, and one of those times is right now.

I won’t call it writer’s block. I don’t believe in it. Writer’s block is almost a hysteria to me. But I can admit that I currently have writer’s depression – well, in reality, I think it’s safe to say I am depressed – but calling it writer’s depression allows me to focus on how my sadness affects my writing life.

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Ever since losing my publisher, it has been difficult. It has been hard to face my characters, and for more reasons than one. The main one is the idea of admitting to them that their stories might never be told. After all the work we’ve done together, it’s hard to admit this, even if it’s not entirely for certain. Other issues arise when I think about how I’m truly just talking to myself, even though talking to my characters does not feel that way at all. The strangeness bubbles up when I can admit that I’m okay with sounding crazy, but I’m not quite sure how to tell my characters about all of the changes that have taken place in my life…so, I’ve been avoiding them. It sounds silly, I know, but it feels a lot like not having the energy to visit with friends after you’ve had a rough week. You’re too tired – a bit too sensitive – and you don’t want to take out your emotions on your friends, so you stay home to avoid hurting your friendships.

I don’t want to destroy my characters.

You see, when I go through a rough time, I generally write a lot, but I write new things: a poem, a shiny new plotline, a card, this blog post. I don’t like writing in whatever I was writing in beforehand because my mindset has been altered for the time being, and during this time, I don’t want to accidentally disrupt the flow of a previous manuscript or scene or character. (Because this has happened before.)

It’s entirely insensible, but I understand that this is how my writing style works. On the contrary – if a character gets too demanding (like a best friend who shows up spontaneously to forcibly drag you out of your dungeon of Cheez-Its and blankets and kittens) then, I make a hesitant exception, and I try to listen to them, and this is generally when I realize little details have been missing from the manuscript before. So, I add them, and I slowly crawl out of my writer’s hole, and I pick up a pen, and I try again, and eventually, I know my characters – and my readers – still love me in the same way I still love them, in the undying way I love writing no matter how lonely it gets.

It is simply nice to talk about it with someone sometime.

Thank you for listening,

~SAT

P.S. Because I’m not writing right now, I do have a lot of free time for additional services! I connect authors with book reviewers and interviewers. I edit stories. I even create photos and give advice on social media. (And I like to believe my prices are far beyond fair. Seriously. I buy a Jimmy John’s sandwich for lunch.) Check out the full list of Services right here or email me at shannonathompson@aol.com.

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