Tag Archives: fiction writing

Website Wonders

28 Mar

Every month, I share all of the websites I come across that I find helpful, humorous, or just awesome. Below, you’ll find all of March’s Website Wonders categorized into Writing, Reading, and Mind-Blowing.

If you enjoy these websites, be sure to follow me on Twitter because I share even more websites and photos like this there.

Favorite Article This Month:

The Disposability of Ideas by Maggie Stiefvater

Aside from loving The Ravel Cycle series, Maggie Stiefvater continues her awesome blog (that I also love). This article in particular is great, because I think many writers struggle to write, which makes it even harder to throw out certain scenes…or even whole books. The creator makes the idea; the idea doesn’t make the creator. You can move on, and you can improve. Much love for this article.


The EPIGUIDE.COM Character Chart for Fiction Writers: These forms always help out writers.

John Steinbeck 6 Writing Tips: If you are using dialogue, say it aloud as you type it.

40 Words For Emotions You’ve Felt, But Couldn’t Explain: SO many hanker sores in fiction.

14 Perfect Japanese Words You Need In Your Life: Like the one below!



If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, He Will Ruin Your Life: A satire piece on If You Give a Mouse a Cookie. I cracked up so hard, since I loved this book so much.

13 Books to Teach You Odd Skills: Because we could all use some more odd skills.

7 of The Most Cheesy Lines of Poetry I Secretly Want My Lover To Use on Me: If you need some cheesy poetry in your life.

INFOGRAPHIC: Inspirational Quotes from Fictional Mentors: “Do or do not—there is no try.” – Yoda


10 Amazing Powers from Genetic Mutations: Heck yeah.

16 Most Beautiful Trees in the World Will Amaze You: You could write entire stories about these trees. (Okay. So I’m a bit obsessed with trees.)

30+ Natural Phenomena That Actually Exist In Reality! There’s nothing like real-life phenomena to spark fantasy novels.

See you next month!



Read Minutes Before Sunset, book 1, for FREE

AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooksSmashwordsKoboGoodreads

Seconds Before Sunrise: book 2:

AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooksSmashwordsKoboGoodreads

Death Before Daylight: book 3:

AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooksSmashwordsKoboGoodreads

Writing Tips: How I Form Dialogue into Writing:

26 Dec

I separate writing into steps, so work with me here, and read twice if you need to start over after the end. This is an excerpt from chapter thirteen in a writing of mine, so don’t read for content; read for basic instruction to help focus on one writing aspect at a time.

First: Dialogue

Personally, I like to write out my dialogue at once, using an abbreviation for who’s speaking, so I know who’s speaking when I come back. This way, I don’t have to worry about description, but I can simply concentrate on the art of conversation.

In this scene, my protagonist, Amea (A), is crying with her back to the door when Emmy (E) checks on her.



E—It’s Emmy.” “Are you crying?”



A—What are you doing here? Where’s Leena?

E—Still sleeping.” “I was in the garden. I don’t play much, but do you want to come with me?

Second: Conversational Description

This is where I separate the speech, so it sounds more realistic and/or add basic character descriptions.



“It’s Emmy,” she said, and I slid the door open as I wiped my tears away. She frowned. “Are you crying?” she asked, and I shook my head. “Good.” (I cut this dialogue to make it sound younger, as Emmy is nine.) 

“What are you doing here? Where’s Leena?”

“Still sleeping.” Emmy shrugged “I was in the garden. I don’t play much, but—” She grinned with crooked teeth. “Want to come with me?”

Third: Further Description and Edit

This part is where I add the description, placing the basic scene and adding to the dialogue with scenic descriptions


I slammed my bedroom door and pressed my back against it, sobbing. Water curled down my fingers, and I clutched my face, falling to the ground. I laid my forehead on my shaky knees as my body shuddered, vibrating as knocking rocked my entrance. (All of this is added)


“It’s Emmy,” she said, and I scooted forward, (added necessary movement) sliding the door open as I wiped my tears away. She frowned, pulling at the ends of her curly red hair (added childish action), and rocked back and forth. “Are you crying?” she asked, and I shook my head. “Good.”

I smiled. “What are you doing here? Where’s Leena?”

“Still sleeping.” Emmy shrugged, pointing down the hall. (added—hall for scene) “I was in the garden. I don’t play much, but—” She grinned with crooked teeth. “Want to come with me?”


It is necessary, so take that beautiful red pen of yours and get to work😀

I hope this may separate your writing into bits in which you can concentrate on important aspects one at a time, rather than worry all at once.

Have fun and write endlessly,



%d bloggers like this: