Tag Archives: happiness

No Makeup Selfie Campaign for Cancer Research

24 Mar

UPDATE: Donate by clicking on this link: Cancer Research UK or by donating to ANY cancer campaign that you is important to you. I am saddened to see many complaining about this campaign, saying things like “it’s just an excuse to take a selfie” or “taking off your makeup doesn’t cure cancer” or “breast cancer gets too much attention.” First, it’s a campaign, not an excuse. Second, complaining about a successful campaign doesn’t cure cancer; money raised by a campaign, however, can help. Most importantly though, ANY kind of cancer cannot get TOO much attention. In this case, I donated to the American Leukemia Foundation. I wasn’t going to share that at all until I saw the amount of negativity on the internet about how this doesn’t raise money. I encourage everyone to take one minute to donate to their foundation of choice. That’s how this campaign is raising money – it reminds everyone to take a moment out of their day to help. This campaign has gained millions of dollars, so it is working. If you do not like this campaign, then fine. Start your own campaign. Seriously. Please, do. I will take part in that, too.

Now the post I originally wrote is still below:

A few days ago, the lovely and humble, Ky Grabowski (I know you’ve heard of this inspiring lady) posted her “Natural Beauty” picture. Basically, this is defined as sharing your face without make up for Cancer Research UK. Before I start, here is an article to check out for more information on this craze:  No make-up selfie craze brings UK cancer charity HK$25m windfall

This charity is an encouraging event for all people, especially women, to embrace themselves. I was very flattered when Ky took the time to nominate me as someone to carry the message on, and that’s what I’m doing today. I’m also sharing why I think this is important to continue. If you would like to take part, please let me know, and I will link your blog below when you post it!

Without further ado,

Photo on 3-21-14 at 4.11 PM

I’ve talked about my previous insecurities before in My Insecurities and How I Overcame Them, but showing how I overcame them – I  feel – is the most important message. Finding confidence in your own skin is really important to me. We must love ourselves before we can send love out into the world.

To be honest, I’ve never really worn makeup. Aside from the occasional mascara, I avoid it completely. That is to say this: there’s nothing wrong with makeup. If you enjoy it, great! That’s wonderful. To me, wearing makeup can be like wearing that new sweater you bought: it just feels good. The problem comes when people are wearing makeup because they don’t feel good enough in their own skin. The problem is when you go into a job interview and the employer REQUIRES you to wear makeup. (Which has personally happened to me.) The problem is when society convinces girls that they need makeup to be socially acceptable. The solution is finding a way to encourage everyone to be confident with themselves, wearing makeup or not.

So, how can we do this?

We spread the word that beauty comes from confidence, that love comes from the heart, that happiness comes from within.

I feel happiest when I’m with my loved ones, eating great food, and just laughing. It has nothing to do with what I’m wearing and/or if I’m having a great hair day (and great hair days are rare for my curly mess.) But you know what? My curly mess SHOULD be a good hair day because every day is a good day that you don’t allow your messy hair or lack of make up or small wardrobe to distract you from what is important: Living life and living it well.

So, whether you’re wearing glamorous makeup or rocking the natural look, go out with a smile on your face, because a smile is the best way to face the future with positivity.

20140320_153904In other news, I actually wanted to share this photo that my father snapped on the day that I received Seconds Before Sunrise in the mail. To me, I think this photo captured how much this moment means to a writer.  It stops us. It reminds us. It shows us the future. And you can’t even see my face. You can just tell how much I cherish the work. I might be cradling the books in my arms, but I’m holding the words in my heart.

Again, if you would like to post your no makeup selfie in your blog, please let me know, and I will link to your post!   

~SAT

The Artist’s Guilt

6 Nov

Win a signed copy of Minutes Before Sunset today

Most people would agree that art is very significant to a culture, especially the older the art lasts. Ironically, those same people might belittle the “starving artists” or any artist for many reasons (the main one generally surrounds an income.) But, even more importantly, artists often belittle themselves, and that’s what I wanted to talk about today: the guilt associated with being an artist.

Granted, I am a writer. I cannot draw. I definitely can’t sing. And dancing might result in a broken limb. So why am I talking about artists like we’re all the same? Because all types of art are a form of expression. With a definition as simple as this, it’s hard to remember why we–as artists–might feel guilty. There’s nothing wrong with expression, right? As long as it’s not violent to others or to the artists, I would say there shouldn’t be any guilt in expressing something, but, to be quite frank, society just doesn’t function on expression.

There are basic necessities needed for survival. There are loved one who need attention. There are bills to be paid. And then there is expression. ( Take the order however you want to take it. )

Because of this, I believe the artist’s guilt comes down to two different categories: (Since I’m a writer, I will be using writers as examples.)

1. The art is conflicting with every day life: it either prohibits life’s needs or life’s needs prohibit the art.

I see this mainly with money. It’s a necessity to life. We buy groceries, see the doctor, and get clothes with money. But it’s hard to make enough money with art, and it’s difficult to pursue art while working a full-time job. Beyond that, we see a time guilt as well. This happen a lot with parents. Mothers and fathers take care of their children first which often takes time away from writing. (This is not to say this is a bad thing, of course.) But I also see it happen with students, who feel guilty about writing instead of studying or studying instead of writing.

2. The art is unsatisfactory to the artist: that can rely on the final piece or how people react to the piece.

I think many artists feel guilty for all of the time they spent on a project if it doesn’t satisfy the viewer or if they failed to meet their own expectations. But my biggest guilt hits me when I realize some of the topics I write about are truly traumatizing to people, and I’m afraid I might offend, hurt, and/or misrepresent those very people. Honestly, I’ve seen reviews of readers saying an author was disrespectful to a topic, and I found myself wondering how a reader could assume the author hadn’t gone through it themselves and that the author was actually being honest rather than disrespectful? It’s hard to say. But I think this guilt–whether it be a reaction from the artist or the viewer–happens a lot.

So what can we do to cope with this artist’s guilt?

A good cuddle session with Bogart also helps with the guilt :]

A good cuddle session with Bogart also helps with the guilt :]

Like everyone else, I have responsibilities: school, work, relationships, etc. But writing is a must for me. My emotional and mental, if not physical, health depends on my ability to express myself. Even if it’s for five minutes, I need it. But that’s not to say I don’t feel guilty when I spend an entire night writing instead of seeing a friend or running errands that I should’ve done last week. I do. And I definitely have anxiety over a reader feeling I’ve misrepresented a group of people. But these two worries are overcome by one fact: Writing brings me happiness. It completes me. No matter how much guilt I feel, I am quickly reminded by how much happiness I feel following my dream, knowing that expressing myself through art will allow me to be the best person that I can be. 

Basically, I think it’s vital for artists to remind themselves why they became artists in the first place and what/why art brings them happiness. We can also remind ourselves that we are definitely not alone in this.

To prove this, you can look at my Facebook Author Page where I asked, “Do you have any guilt associated with being a writer?” And here were two fantastic answers: 

Patrick Dixon: (Insomnia, Nightmares, and General Madness)

“I tend to suffer from an overabundance of guilt in general, but two kinds directly relating to writing are pretty common for me:

First, that I don’t do it enough or well enough, so the concept of even calling myself a “writer” feels like a bad joke. This has been especially common in the last couple of months since personal, financial and health problems have kept me away from the keyboard for far longer than they should have. There isn’t really a cure for this other than just sitting down and writing, but that has a way of making it’s own guilt complex (“What am I ignoring to do this, which is actually just a hobby or a joke or a waste of time, hmmm?”)

Second, similarly to you, that what I write will offend, irritate or otherwise alienate readers, especially those sensitive to the source material. One of my novels deals heavily with a suicidally depressed (and possibly schizophrenic or otherwise delusional) individual and ends… well. Quite poorly for him, we’ll say. I’ve received several angry comments, claiming that I don’t know what it’s like (and, actually, given a background of abuse and mental and physical health issues, that’s kind of where most of it came from…) and some that claim it’s essentially an endorsement for erratic and suicidal behavior (when I was trying to write it out of my system, not “infect” others with it.) Again, there isn’t much you can do except stand by your work; you wrote it, the “truth” as you knew it, and it’s bound to upset somebody… but it’s also likely that there’s just as many somebodies who found something useful in it.”

Josephine Jones Harwood: Romance Writer

“This is an excellent question and topic, Shannon. I just read this post and I hope I’m not too late to make a comment: As a first-time author there has been a transition that has occurred in my life. Writing is no longer a hobby like putting a puzzle together for relaxation. I feel a true passion and need to write and keep on writing…and this is when the guilt settles in like a stone in the pit of my stomach. I am a wife, a mother, and I am also a family caregiver. Writing must take a backseat to obligations and responsibilities. I have no regrets, and I have a very blessed life. I truly appreciate the quiet moments when it is my time to write…but this is always accompanied by guilt…because it is “my” time.”

So do have any guilt associated with being a writer? Or being any kind of artist? 

Comment below and share your story!

~SAT

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