Tag Archives: improve your writing

Website Wonders

27 Apr

Every month, I share all of the websites I come across that I find helpful, humorous, or just awesome. Below, you’ll find all of April’s Website Wonders categorized into Writing, Reading, Art, and the Weird.

If you enjoy these websites, be sure to follow me on Twitter @AuthorSAT because I share even more websites and photos like this there.

Favorite Article: 6 Hard Truths Every Writer Should Accept.

I really loved how honest and open it was without making the reader fell overwhelmed or inexperienced for not already knowing the information. (Plus, I agree with everything said in the article.) A great, to-the-point piece to consider.

Writing:

The Power of Words and How To Build Your Vocabulary: I hear questions about building one’s vocabulary a lot, so here is an excellent article about it.

12 Useful Websites to Improve Your Writing: Use these at your own discretion, but I thought it was a fun list to explore.

An Affective Beginner’s Guide to Writing Books (An Infograph): I love infographs. I simply cannot help myself.

Creative Writing Exercises: This is a virtual list of other writing exercise lists.

12938347_578632518970803_936326365534059914_nReading:

10 Phenomenally Tricky Books Everyone Should Read: If you’re feeling particularly tricky this month.

10 Incredibly Useful Books You Should Own: Your library is going to grow from these lists!

Art:

Visually Arresting New Sketchbook Spreads and Drawings by Pat Perry: I found these disturbing in a delightful way.

The Weird:

Here Are The 50 Most Ironic Ways People Have Died. Seriously, Don’t Die Like This.: I often say that so many things happen in real life that we can’t put in fiction, because readers wouldn’t believe it. This article is a perfect example for the morbid character in you.

40 People From The Internet Reveal An Unexplainable Moment From Their Lives: I love little stories like this, especially in the middle of the night.

5 Superpowers You Didn’t Know Your Body Was Hiding From You: Who doesn’t love superpowers?

See you next month,

~SAT

event5Clean Teen Publishing is hosting an event – the #AskCTP Giveaway on Twitter TONIGHT! I’m REALLY excited about this live author-reader Q&A, and I really hope you all can make it. You can even win a CTP Mystery Box, which includes 1 to 2 print books, swag, and more.

In other news, I will be at the 101st Annual Missouri Writers’ Guild Conference in Kansas City, Missouri from April 29 to May 1! Feel free to shoot me an e-mail if you’re coming, so we can connect! I’d love to see some of you there. It’s going to be an absolute blast.

Pre-Order Bad Bloods today!

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What can you expect in Bad Bloods?

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#AuthorinaCoffeeShop Episode 17 starts this Thursday via Twitter’s @AuthorSAT at 7 PM CDT. What is #AuthorinaCofffeeShop? Just how it sounds! I sit in a coffee shop, people watch, tweet out my writer thoughts, and talk to you! I hope to see you there.

#MondayBlogs: Website Wonders

27 Apr

Website Wonders: 

Every month, I share all of the websites I come across that I find helpful, humorous, or just awesome. Below, you’ll find all of April’s Website Wonders categorized into Writing, Reading, Travel, Coffee, and Art. If you enjoy these websites, be sure to follow me on Twitter because I share even more websites and photos like this there.

Enjoy!

Writing:

Random Name Generator: For those who need help with naming characters

12 Techniques to Improve Your Writing in 2015: Solid

Reading:

42 Random Harry Potter Facts That Will Make You More Knowledgeable Than a Ravenclaw: Are you a Ravenclaw?

10 Nonfiction Books to Blow Your Mind: Because I adore nonfiction

7 Books That Will Change How You See The World: A great list with memorable quotes

15 Books Everyone Should Read At Least Once in Their Life: Which ones have you read?

12 Great Books (And The Perfect Mood to Read Them In): I love book lists.

The Ten Greatest Fantasy Series of All Time: Any of your favorites on here?

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Travel:

10 of the Most Magnificent Trees in the World: Because we know Shannon is secretly obsessed with trees.

Three Future Scenarios for Romantic Love: possibly my favorite article out of this entire bunch. This is sort of travel? Travel to the future.

Coffee:

The Best Time to Drink Coffee According to Science: Do you follow these rules?

Which Profession Drinks the Most Coffee: I’ll give you a hint. Writers and editors aren’t in the top three. (WHAT?)

Art:

Just Look At The Stunning Detail in These Mini Painting and Try to Not Be Impressed: Amazing! I’m impressed.

There you have it! I hope you enjoyed these website wonders! See you with more next month!

~SAT

Relax & Read: How to Write a Sentence

19 Mar

As told in my Back to School post, my NonFiction Writing I class assigned Stanley Fish’s How-To book, How to Write a Sentence: And How to Read One. We just wrapped up this short (only 160 pages) book, and, although my class had some complaints about simplicity, I really enjoyed it.

From the beginning, Fish describes the sentence as a medium (like paint to the artist) and how writers need to love the sentence before they can master the sentence. When he states, “I belong to the tribe of sentences watchers” I fell in love. I thought his honesty was relatable, and his task was courageous. As many writers like to believe they understand everything there is to writing, especially after practicing for years, no one does, and I think Fish acknowledges this very respectively. He doesn’t act as if he knows everything; instead, he opens up to forms upon forms upon styles that can be reviewed and studied, torn apart and understood.

This was the copy I bought, but it's often red and hardcover now.

This was the copy I bought, but it’s often red and hardcover now.

I really liked this, BECAUSE of his simplicity. I think, at least for me, I often get caught up in the complexity of language (meaning I’ve surpassed the basics, but I sometimes lose myself on complicating things too much.) Like an abstract artist, I may lose concentration on the overall piece, and Fish really grips reality when he discusses the relationships from word to word, sentence to sentence.

“This is what language does: organize the world into manageable, and in some sense artificial, units that can then be inhabited and manipulated.”

I really encourage others (and myself) to often return to the basics, because that is our foundation, and we need a strong foundation if we’re going to keep building up. You cannot neglect the support when it begins to topple. In other words, you cannot forget your basic structures, even if you’re working within complex ones.

On top of that, if you’re looking for some quick writing tips, Fish discusses first and last sentences towards the back of the book, and I think his insights are very useful.

So..if you’re in the bookstore, and you’re looking for a quick read to help improve writing, take a step backwards and relearn where you came from in the first place.

It will surely strike up that passion of our original love for our medium: the sentence,

~SAT

March 21: Publishing News: Synopsis & Cover Date Reveal

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