Tag Archives: interviews

#MondayBlogs: The Thing About Author Interviews

25 May

Intro:

If you’ve been following me for a while, I’m sure you’ve heard me mention Jonas Lee. He’s a fantastic author—both as a writer and as a supportive participant in the Indie community. I’ve even had the absolute pleasure of being interviewed via Google+ and appearing later on his YouTube channel (which you can watch here), and I make it a point to always listen to his latest interviews. That was why I chased him down and asked him to write today’s post. Jonas Lee discusses the importance of interviewing authors . . . and he’s also open for authors to sign up for an interview on his channel! For interview requests, please email Jonas Lee at JL.Fiction@gmail.com, and tell him I sent you. But if for some reason, you need more convincing, (wink), read his post below. I highly recommend talking to this wonderful author!

#MondayBlogs The Thing About Author Interviews

Who in the hell would want to know more about me? That’s the general thought I had when I first received a request to do an interview. Then, I was inwardly squealing with delight, Someone wants to know more about me! Now, I’m not famous (yet) so it felt a little weird to answer questions about my writing style and advice to give to other aspiring authors at the time. The thing is, most people who want to publish a novel, never do. It’s not because they are bad writers or can’t deliver a good story. It’s because they get to that proverbial edge of the cliff, overlooking the ocean and just…can’t…jump.

It’s friggin terrifying! Leaping with your work in hand off into the Indie Ocean (I should trademark that). In the water there are thousands of other authors. Some swimming, others floating. Some are making enough noise to be seen by anyone while some very worthwhile and prolific authors are content treading water. We all want rescued and by that I mean we want our stories heard. The best way to do that is getting attention and swimming together. How do you do that?

Networking is the new game, my friends. Swimmers in the Indie Ocean have an almost secular bond we don’t fully understand. Simply utter the word and you have a brother or sister in arms. We all fight the same struggle and essentially bleed the same blood. So, we band together and interview one another. We review each other’s books and throw out nods, tags, mentions, hashtags, recommendations and whatever we can in the spirit of fellowship.

Why are interviews seemingly important? They deliver a message, plainly. It’s your message through the eyes and pages of another author/blogger/reviewer. It’s a glimpse into Oz behind the curtain. Putting a face or a personality to the name that created a work of other worlds or situations is almost more than words can capture. I love reading interviews by my favorite authors and especially thankful to call some of those authors my friends now, present company included. Plus, beyond the stories we create, we have our own stories of getting there and how we came up with them to begin with. Interviews are like the Extra content on DVDs/BluRay movies.

Me, personally, I love answering questions and I tried some 2-dimensional Q&A’s of my own. I started doing something in the spirit of a stepping outside my comfort zone. I began interviewing other authors on camera…live. I’ve had a few hiccups thus far, but overall, I’m not doing too shabby. My whole purpose was to shine a light on authors and soon to be published authors who are out there swimming in the Indie Ocean. Putting voices to faces and personalities to the writers who create some fantastic worlds is my goal. Plus, I’ve made some great friends and I look forward to making many more.

Bio:

jonas002Jonas Lee was handcrafted from the area around the Black Hills of South Dakota. Living in the ever-changing climate with his wife and daughter, he likes to keep his mind occupied with entertaining stories and thought provoking scenarios. A child of the 80’s, his imagination has always been rampant with thoughts of time travel, other dimensions, and the fight of good versus evil. As such, you can see how prevalent those thought are in his stories.

Jonas is the author of The Legend of Carter Gabel series about a young boy who is “afflicted” with the genetic disease of spontaneous time travel. Carter soon realizes how his illness has many other side-effects and the situations surrounding his life and those like him are about to take a turn for the dangerous. If the snarky humor doesn’t grab you, the plot should do the trick.

Books: A Time to Reap and A Time to Live

Want to be a guest blogger? I would love to have you on! I am accepting original posts that focus on reading and writing. A picture and a bio are encouraged. You do not have to be published. If you qualify, please email me at shannonathompson@aol.com.

~SAT

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Author Announcements

24 Jul

Author Announcements:

I am back! And my little vacation was pretty perfect. I ended up in Branson, Missouri. I’ve never been there before, so I didn’t know what to expect, but I visited a wax museum, the Titanic museum, and a maze of mirrors. (They are seriously difficult to get through.) And I ate a funnel cake that was the size of my face, so the past few days were truly fantastic.

Thank you all for understanding my time away. One of these days, I’ll write about why stepping away is one of the best things a writer can do, but today I really wanted to thank all those bloggers who kept things going while I was away. Because so much happened, I’ve actually organized the events into categories. I hope you’ll check out these fantastic websites.

It is good to be home,

~SAT

P.S. I’ll share photos in between categories, so here’s a picture of me at the Titanic Museum.

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Guest Post:

Pau’s Castles invited me to write a guest post about how I managed my writing time during my time as a college student, so I wrote a post, and here’s my first piece of advice from that article:

“First Step: Figure Out Your Schedule

And I mean really figure it out. How many courses are you taking, and how many hours do they truly demand? What days are your busiest? Factor in midterms and finals. Don’t forget about family birthdays or how professors sometimes give out MORE work during extended holidays. Now, figure out when you’re most available. Is it at night? Is it before classes start? Is it only on the weekends? Once you have your responsibilities figured out as well as your free time defined, it will be easier to factor in your writing needs – which brings me to my next point.”

Click here to read my next point. 

Here’s a photo of Humphrey Bogart and Marilyn Monroe at the Hollywood Wax Museum

Wax museum

Wax museum

Interviews:

The Starving Bibliophile asked me many questions this week, but my favorite one involved POV in my works. I finally explain why Noah didn’t narrate Take Me Tomorrow, because – surprise – he, originally, did tell half of the story, but I also talk about the one career I wanted before I wanted to be a writer.

HeiBooks is a new website that features all kinds of writers, and they invited me on for Take Me Tomorrow. On my page, you can read about our interview, and you can a scroll around their website for many other novels, including many AEC Stellar books. Click here to check it out.

Here’s my giant funnel cake.

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Reviews:

Diary of an Eager Reader is the latest reviewer on this wonderful list that I’m truly thankful for. She read Take Me Tomorrow, beginning her review with “I have to consider myself to be pretty lucky since some of my favorite stories come to me through the help of authors who are looking to get buzz for their books.  9 times out of 10 they are great stories that i’m more than happy to talk about, and this one falls right there with those 9.  I really enjoyed this story.” And she tells you why in her review here.

Inkwell & Paper also reviewed Take Me Tomorrow, titling their review “One Pill Makes a Difference.” The review begins with, “Take Me Tomorrow by Shannon A. Thompson is a book that unfolded like an action packed movie.” And her review reads like an action packed movie, too, which you can read by clicking here. But I truly appreciate that she pointed out her two favorite quotes. Click the linked numbers to read them on Goodreads:

1. “The emotional toll was enough to put me to sleep, but my anxiety was enough to keep me awake.”

2. “Behind his gaze was a memory that I wanted to snatch from him.”

Ray’s Works – the website of Matter of Resistance author Raymond Vogel, is my next reviewer, stating, “Expect vivid images, creative characters (with even more creative motivations), and a complex web of connectivity that’s hard to guess. Well done!” But you can read his full review here.

And finally, Things Matter, wrote “The tone and content are very similar to The Hunger Games, and I recommend Take Me Tomorrow if you’re looking for a read-alike to that or if you just like YA dystopia in general!” But you can read all of her thoughts by clicking here.

Here is a car outside the Uptown Cafe where they sing live while you eat!

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Feature:

I was also author of the week on Books to Curl Up with Blog!

Have fun checking out these great websites!

~SAT

Interview with Andrew Vogel, actor on Under the Dome, and director

5 Dec

Special thanks to Mrs N of Princess of the Light: Shining the Light for All for nominating ShannonAThompson.com for Blog of the Year: 2013 and the Dragon’s Loyalty Award.

Another special thanks goes to Jennifer K Marsh, author of ILIMOSKUS, for nominating ShannonAThompson.com for the WordPress Family award.

Today, I am delighted to announce that I was able to interview Andrew Vogel, the actor who played Carter Thibodeau in Under The Dome On CBS. You might have seen a photo of him holding Minutes Before Sunset in my last post. Afterward, he was nice enough to agree to an interview, and you can read it below.

Shannon: Hi, Andrew. Thank you for talking with me today.

Andrew: My pleasure.

Shannon: When do you remember deciding to become an actor, what inspired you, and how did you go about it?

Andrew: Well,  I think I was always somewhat of a performer.  I had done plays throughout grammar school and high school. It was always fun for me to be in front of people.  Although it was always nerve-wracking and still is. But I never saw acting as a career option and ended up studying psychology in college.  But even then I was always working on different creative projects.  I even had a comedic rap group going at one point.

At the same time I enrolled in grad school for business of all things, I enrolled in a local acting class. Almost immediately I dis-enrolled from grad school and decided I wanted to give film acting a run. The class had certainly awoken my passion for the art. I had taken a year off after undergrad to work retail and I was flat out miserable.  It was one of those things where I just knew it wasn’t what I was supposed to be doing. I don’t know if that year inspired me, but it certainly made me realize that I would never be content if creativity wasn’t a significant part of my work.

Anyway, I began training for film acting and also working retail part time. Which still wasn’t satisfying enough.  Did I mention I don’t like working retail? But soon enough, through some good contacts and well placed volunteer efforts, I landed a job as the Editor of Louisiana Film and Video Magazine which allows me to work from home and virtually pursue my creative endeavors full time.

Andrew Vogel as Carter on the set of Under the Dome

Andrew Vogel as Carter on the set of Under the Dome

Shannon: I also hear that you have a passion for directing. What do you like most about directing and do you have any upcoming plans with it?

Andrew: I directed one short film for a 48 hour film contest. It was one of the most rewarding creative experiences I’ve ever had. I had my hand on every detail of the film from the overall vision down to props and costumes. I think what I loved the most was the chaos of it all.  There was so much creative freedom within that chaos. Ideas were flowing off the cuff for myself and the entire team. My wheels were turning as fast as ever, and yet I was forced to be in the moment and keep things moving. There was no time for creative blocks.  We made decisions, improvised and adapted. It’s amazing what ended up remaining of the original vision by the time it was all said and done.  We had added so much richness by the end of the project that wouldn’t have been there if it wasn’t for the driving force of chaos. Never have I felt more focused and alive, ha.

The feedback we got on the film after the contest was as good as we could have hoped for. Unfortunately, we turned it in a bit late and were not eligible for awards.  On the upside, we did another version of the film with more footage and better quality sound that we are sending out to festivals.

Nothing is set in stone yet, but myself and the original crew of the 48 hour project are always cooking up new ideas.  I certainly plan on directing again in the near future.

Shannon: What has been your most interesting experience as an actor?

Andrew Vogel with Minutes Before Sunset.

Andrew Vogel with Minutes Before Sunset.

Andrew: Being on set as an actor is always interesting.  You kind of fall into a bubble where the outside world doesn’t seem to exist. And you tend to quickly get to know the people you work.  Often times there is little sleep and a lot of waiting. That combination leads to interesting conversation.

For me, my favorite moment as an actor was my first day on Under the Dome.  Keep in mind I had never worked on a project near this size before so I was excited to say the least.  I felt like I was living the dream.  I mean, I was getting paid to do what I love in a city I’ve never been.  I had a king suite at the hotel, a personal trailer on set, and food on demand.  Not a bad setup for a layman. So after being delivered a breakfast burrito to my trailer, I was taken to set with some other actors. They all seemed cooler than me. And probably were.  Once I was on set, I was introduced to the director who responded, “I know who he is. I hired him,” and followed by telling me, “Do exactly what you did in the audition.”  I was nervous at first.  The scenes I was in seemed to revolve around my character, Carter, who is an older bully crashing a high school party with a sixer of beer and a bravado worthy of Steve Stifler.  After my first take which to me felt shaky, the director said to me, “That was bleepin perfect,” and proceeded to give me minor technical notes.  That in combination with a seemingly endless amount of takes had me feeling confident.  By the end of the day I was teaching extras how to spin beer bottles in their hand and seeing how many winks I could fit in before they yelled “cut”. Slight exaggeration.

Shannon: Is your favorite genre of film to work with different from your favorite genre of film to watch?

Andrew: I don’t think I have a favorite genre to work with yet.  I’m certainly still discovering my strengths and weaknesses.  As a dream role I would like to play a villain in one of those comic book movies.

It’s hard to put a label on my favorite movie genre to watch, but I like films that have psychological or philosophical depth. Preferably with surreal or fantastical elements. In my opinion, a good film, like a good book, leaves me thinking afterwards.

Shannon: Has any one specifically encouraged you to become an actor? Has any one discouraged it? What are the best and worst parts about these careers?

Andrew: Since my decision to pursue a career as an actor, most everyone has been supportive. My parents have always encouraged me to perform I think from a young age. Because they knew I enjoyed it. More people are supportive since Under the Dome. Go figure.

I’ve always been a high-risk achiever.  Meaning I try to accomplish the unlikely. And there’s always been people who have told me that I couldn’t do something, and then when I do it, they look for some sort of corruption. That’s okay though. I think the people closest to me have learned to expect the unexpected.

The best part about my career is the fact that I do what I love as a profession.  The worst part is being rejected over and over. But even that isn’t so bad.  I’m at the point where, unless it’s a major audition, I forget about auditions as soon as they are over with.

If you care about having a lot of money, it’s a much tougher road.

Shannon: Finally, do you have any inspirational quotes or thoughts to share with those aspiring to become an actor or director?

Andrew: My philosophy in life is simply to pursue passion and never stop exploring. If you aren’t sure what you are passionate about, then explore life with an open mind until you do. Finding passion will guide you to truth and happiness.

That being said, first make sure you want to act or direct for the right reasons, then jump in head first and don’t look back. Be bold. Take chances. And no matter how much talent you think you might have, be prepared to start from nothing and learn from the best. Without humility and flexibility, you won’t grow as an artist.

“So many of our dreams at first seem impossible, then they seem improbable, and then, when we summon the will, they soon become inevitable.” ― Christopher Reeve

Shannon: Thank you again for speaking with me today.

Be sure to visit Andrew Vogel at IMDB.

~SAT 

Writing Tips: Setting Rules

14 Aug

Website Update: Shannon A. Thompson went over 8,500 followers! Thank you for your support. 😀

Yesterday I was very flattered to be featured on Read to Write Stories, a fantastic and detailed blog written by reader and writer, Michaell Noll. I definitely recommend his blog if you’re a writer looking for new ways to enhance your passionate skill. What he does is very focused: he reads a novel and then creates a writing prompt, along with guidelines to understanding a concept of writing, that goes along with said novel. If you haven’t read the post he did yesterday it was How to Set the Rules Your Characters Must Live By, and it discussed Minutes Before Sunset, particularly the first few chapters and how they affect the rest of the storyline. Here is the writing prompt he came up with:

“Let’s practice setting the rules, using Minutes Before Sunset as a model:

  1. Choose a character and a world for that character to inhabit.
  2. Define the world with a single adjective: happy, sad, fearful, proud, bored, etc.
  3. Free write about that adjective. Your goal is to find an image of the world or the people in it that demonstrates the adjective, if possible without actually stating it. The image will set the rules for the world. Future descriptions of the world should adhere to this early image in some way. So, in Minutes Before Sunset, the town’s denial of the supernatural elements in its midst is suggested by the fact that it calls a hill a mountain. In Gone in 60 Seconds, the stovetop burns out of control to suggest Kip’s lack of control.
  4. Now, free write about the character. How does he/she feel about the image you just created? Try to find an action that suggests the character’s attitude toward the world. For instance, in The Hunger Games, the fact that Katniss sneaks through the fence in order to hunt suggests that she’s willing to break the rules to protect her family. Thus, the big event at the end of the first chapter—volunteering for the Games in place of her sister—feels like a natural extension of her character, of the attitude that we’ve already witnessed.”

Rule 4 blew me away. I loved it, because it pushes the prompt that much further–and all of his prompts go this way. Seriously. Check him out if you’re looking for a new set of writing challenges. His Facebook page can be found here.

In other news:1002590_561096383937547_640499946_n

My day was made the other day when reader, Tyler Gravenstein, sent me a picture of him with Minutes Before Sunset. I love seeing readers interacting with any books, let alone mine–and it’s the new version!  I’ve given away a lot of free ebooks this week to interested readers, and I wanted to take a moment to thank all of them! If you’re interested in doing a review and appearing on my sites, I can supply you with one as well. Which brings me to some very important people:

Nita Bee’s Buzzin Books:  

A lover of books and poetry, Nita took a moment to interview me. She was wonderful, and I was delighted to be able to answer her questions and discuss the future. Plus, I always LOVE fellow readers. Here’s an excerpt of her detailed questions:

“Did you put a lot of time into thinking about this book or was it something ready to go in your head?
The second book was written first. It came easily, but, as I was writing it, I realized I needed a book before to set up the world Eric and Jessica lived in. I planned the entire first book, wrote that, and the third book came to me as I edited the second. I think most of my novels come to me easily, but the little details have to be obsessed over for a number of weeks before I feel comfortable enough writing the books down. ”

Kierney Scott (Romance Writer)

Author of Twice in a Lifetime, I was delighted when our interview stretched beyond my novels and allowed readers to see more personal details of my life. For instance, she asks me what was the most romantic thing anyone has done for you and what my favorite meal is. This was fun, because I don’t normally get to answer these things about myself, but here’s an interesting excerpt that revolved around Jessica in Minutes Before Sunset:

“Describe your heroine in five words. Determined. Stubborn. Loving. Learning. Conflicted.

In what way is she most like you? Jessica accepts people for who they are, even if she may not see herself that way. She doesn’t really judge, but it can also lead to conflicting  emotions about people.

In what way is she different? She’s very defensive and has a few moments where she steps over the necessary attitude line.”

Please check these lovely ladies out as well as Michael Noll. There is an entire world filled with talented people out there, and I’m excited to get to know them while also sharing them with everyone else.

Have a great day,

~SAT

150th Post

27 Jul

It’s a good feeling seeing those numbers rise–whether it be fellow authors I’ve connected with, sales, or blog comments that represent all the conversations I’ve had with passionate readers, writers, and dreamers. So I wanted to take a moment to thank everyone who supports so many people on this journey of writing and publishing. I am very grateful to have every single one of you cheering me on! And I wanted to share a special moment with everyone:

The photo below was taken on July 31, 2007–the day I received the first copy of November Snow in the mail. I’d just turned 16, but I moved shortly afterward, and I lost the photo…or so I thought. A few days ago, I found it on an old computer’s files. It means a lot to me, because the moment was my first novel’s release, and I’m glad I have it again. I’m sharing it, because it’s another one of those instances where we, as writers, can find inspiration from our pasts. 

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But I also have three other wonderful things to share today:

The Examiner reviewed Minutes Before Sunset: 5 STARS! 

“Benevolent magical creatures of the Dark called shades live clandestinely among humans as nimble shape-shifters while readying for a pivotal battle against the evil beings of Light.” 

Read the rest here. I can promise the reviewer, Lionel Green, has a way with words, and I’m flattered by his in-depth review and analysis of the piece.

And if you want even more information, I’d recommend two delightful interviews I was able to participate in:

Interview by upcoming author, Jackson Paul Baer:

Although I’m interviewed about my novels, Baer also adds some fun questions about what I like outside my writing world. Oceans or Mountains? Favorite T.V. show? Happy or sad ending to a novel?

Find out what I said here.

And this interview focuses on the writing and publishing industry:

Writing Under Fire: Young Blood in the Publishing World

Joanne asks: What was the hardest part for you in the writing process; the outline, synopsis, query or building the story itself? What do you do to promote yourself and your novels? Do you also write in other genres?

Find out what I said here.

I have to thank everyone who follows me, but I also want to emphasize how much I appreciate those who have interviewed me and/or reviewed my novels. I’m always excited to participate, and I look forward to discussing these topics with more and more readers and writers. It’s a wonderful and fun opportunity to connect further, but I can’t do it alone, so thank you for allowing me to do so through your support 😀

Speaking of which, I’m still giving away free copies of Minutes Before Sunset for review in order to celebrate Goodreads Book of the Month for July! If you’re interested in that (or interviews–or anything really!) email me at shannonathompson@aol.com.

I am also thinking about doing more guest blog posts in the future, so look out for that!

Changes are coming, but I’m excited about them!

Have a great weekend,

~SAT

Publishing Tips: Marketing Your Book

21 Apr

Website Update: April 22: 8:00 a.m.: Shannon A Thompson Facebook Fan Page hit 200 likes today! Thank you 😀

10 days before the Minutes Before Sunset release (AEC Stellar Publishing) ! 

I know many of you are fellow authors or are working to become one, so I thought I’d dedicate today’s post to bringing attention to your work. (Especially since I’m often asked how I gained as many followers as I have) So below is a list of aspects to consider along with websites before you begin marketing (which I used myself to get where I am today.)

1. Readers: There’s no mistake that they are my number one is my list. Readers are vital to an author’s ultimate success. A writer could have the best publishing team for their story available, yet if they don’t have a relatable and entertaining story, an author won’t make it. The readers, in the end, decide, and that’s why I really suggest connecting with your fans as much as possible. Have an email they can send you messages, questions, and reviews too. Connect with them on all the websites below (don’t force them to join, but rather connect with the ones that are already on the sites.) Create a Facebook page they can follow (since many don’t feel comfortable sharing their personal Facebook, and I completely agree with that.) and talk to them on there. Figure out what they like and what they didn’t like about your book. Be willing to change. Be even more willing to help them change by supporting their dreams to become a writer or something else entirely. Personally, I love searching around the web for fellow writers, readers, and bloggers. I follow their blogs, and I often like or comment on material. That way, I find readers, rather than expect them to come to me, and I don’t expect them to follow back. They can reciprocate or not, because I’m coming to them as a reader (not a marketing writer) and respecting their work. If they check me out, and decide to support me, that’s great!

Oh! And never stop writing. Even if you're drenched in monsoon rain in the middle of an airport.

Oh! And never stop writing. Even if you’re drenched in monsoon rain in the middle of an airport.

2. Internet: Join as many social networking sites as possible for both yourself and your work. If you click any of the website below, you’ll be taken to my personal page, but you can see how authors and readers can connect through these communications. You can even join, too!

  • Have a blog: If you don’t have a publisher yet, you’ll surely run into this in the future. Blogs are essential in connecting with readers, so you’ll almost be expected to have a website. If you don’t already have one that you keep updated on a regular basis, I’d suggest creating a page with a blog. I update mine (this very page) every two days (three if I’m having a particularly busy week) with information on entertainment, writing, and publishing. This allows my blog to be focused but also fun to write and fun for others to read. 
  • Facebook: No one can deny how popular Facebook has been over the past couple of years. Even when you create a new profile, you fill out your “likes,” and that’s where authors and books come in.

    One part of my Interactive interview on Twitter with Sezoni Whitfield.

    One part of my Interactive interview on Twitter with Sezoni Whitfield.

  1. Author Page: Create a page for only you. This way you can announce all of your books, events, and other announcements all on one page. Personally, my author page has the most activity, compared to my individual book pages.
  2.  Novel Fan Page: This is purely created so fans can put your book in the “favorite books” section and/or follow news specifically about the book they enjoyed. I have one for both “November Snow” & “Minutes Before Sunset.”
  • TwitterTwitter is wonderful for finding writers and readers. Simply use a hashtag (#) and find anyone under the sun that is discussing the topics you want to connect with. I’ve also done an interactive interview on Twitter with Sezoni Whitfield, and I gained 200 followers in one days.
  • Publisher’s page: If you have a publisher, be sure to include their page, information, and more contacts. This allows your readers to see what you’re up to professionally, and it also gives them the opportunity as writers to see how the situations differ and work.
  • GoodreadsShelfariBoth of these websites are focused on readers. It allows a place for readers to connect and discuss what they thought about a book. Add your novel to join in on the conversations which include reviews, favorite quotes, bookshelves, lists, and trivia.

    Flyer used

    Flyer used

  • Amazon Author Central: For both published and self-published authors, you can control your author page on Amazon. This is wonderful, because you can connect it with your novels, blogs, Twitter, and Facebook. You can also announce events.
  • Linked In: This is mainly for professionals you’ve connected with: publishers, agents, cover artists, editors, etc. But I recommend joining it, because you never know which one of those very types of people may come across your resume.
  • All Author’s ListA free database that enhances your ability to appear on the internet.

Think about the internet this way: the more you’re involved, the more likely your name will pop up on a Google search. Don’t hesitate to spread yourself across many social networking sites, because readers go to many different websites to find authors.

3. Now Market! 

Now that you’ve joined the World Wide Web, you can start sharing your name and news all over. Without going into extravagant details on all those websites again, however, I’ll give other opportunities.

  • Find local businesses willing to support you. Print out flyers and share them with their customers. I have to thank Ice Fire Hookah in Shawnee, Kansas for doing this for me. It is very kind to know such a great group of people willing to support the arts.
  • Accept interviews, but also apply for them: Currently I’ve done five interviews for Minutes Before Sunset, and I’ve added them to my Extra’s Page: If you want to interview me, please don’t hesitate to send an email to ShannonAThompson@aol.com
    1. Michael Fedison (March 11, 2013)
    2. Tim Flanagan (March 13, 2013)
    3. Dan Pantagram (April 16, 2013).
    4. Sezoni on Twitter’s #WritersKaboodle (April 18, 2013)
    5. The Magill Review (April 19, 2013)
  • Create Extras: This allows readers to interact with your work. I’ve talked about this before, so if you’re looking for ideas, visit my Extra’s Page. I also have 2 other extras coming this Wednesday !
  • Exchange Reviews: There are many authors like yourself that are wanting more reviews and buys. I’d suggest reviewing others’ works anyways, but if you don’t have a lot of time, I could understand why asking for them to exchange reviews is good. Try it out and see where you go from there.

I know today’s post was tedious, but if you have any questions or want further elaboration, comment below, and I will surely get back to you!

April 24: One Week To Go: Sneak Peek Chapter

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