Tag Archives: july 4th

#SATurday: How I Feel About Releasing My Novel

4 Jul

How I Feel About Releasing My NovelScreenshot_2015-06-08-08-30-15

Happy 4th to all you Americans out there! Before you start shooting off fireworks, I thought I’d share a funny little article. As many of you know, my novel—Minutes Before Sunset—releases this month. EEK! And Minutes Before Sunset begins on Independence Day. In fact, Independence Day plays a HUGE role in The Timely Death Trilogy. You know, light vs. dark and all that firework jazz. (Not to mention a certain death…but moving on.)

We’re getting so close to the release date of Minutes Before Sunset, and my silly feelings are all over the place. I’m nervous. Actually out-of-my-mind nervous.

But, Shannon, haven’t you released books before? In fact, haven’t you released these exact books before?

Yes. I have. And that doesn’t change a single little thing. My nerves are still on fire, and even though that sounds like another fireworks metaphor, I mean it more like my heart has been beating so fast that I’m hot. And in the sweaty way. Not in the wet T-shirt sort of way. (…Can I even say that? I don’t even know.)

As an author, I think many expect us to get used to these nervous feelings. In fact, I think I always thought authors probably adjusted too. But now that I am an author, I’ve realized the nerves just change from instance to instance. For example, when my first novel—November Snow—released in 2007, I was nervous, but I believe I was also in shock and a little embarrassed to even tell anyone. I was still in high school, after all, and my experiences in high school weren’t exactly popularity and parties. I basically kept my novel to myself, aside from a few students and a couple teachers supporting me here and there (and one teacher even blatantly telling me they didn’t support me). So, my first novel’s nerves were raw nerves, nerves I didn’t even know how to feel since I didn’t know what to expect. Fast-forward six years to the original release of Minutes Before Sunset and those feelings were quite similar. I had been out of the game long enough that the industry had flipped completely. We’re talking the Kindle released and self-publishing boomed. I was starting over all over again. Now that two years have passed since then, and I’m on this release, I’m nervous about many different things. So I thought it’d be fun to try to show a somewhat accurate version of how nervous feelings takeover my thought process. This is probably an average day for me.

Okay. July 28. It’s (insert number) of days away. Right? ::checks calendar for the umpteenth time like I could possibly forget the release day:: Right. You remembered. It’s (insert same number) of days away. And on that day, the new version will release. Oh, god. It’s releasing.

Will original readers like this new version? I love the new cover. It even has new editing and typography inside. The format for thoughts and telepathic communication are even different, something original readers suggested. Maybe they’ll notice? Maybe no one will notice. I hope they notice. Wait. How will I even know if they notice?

Will new readers try the trilogy? Am I doing the right thing by re-releasing the trilogy again or am I losing readers who wanted something new? What should I give readers next and when would they want it? Wait. Concentrate on what you’re doing now. Sales? Should I worry about sales? Reviews? Will reviews be different this time around?

How will readers like the last book? I’m so glad Death Before Daylight is finally getting its chance to release. Wait. What if the world ends before September 15 and no one gets to read Death Before Daylight? Well…then, I guess you have bigger problems. And that’s probably not going to happen. But you might get a cool story idea out of this scenario if you keep thinking about it…wait. Concentrate. How can you make this better for readers? What giveaways can you do? When can you write in the prequel? When could you post the prequel? Should you tweet and ask? Is that what you should tweet next? Is there anything you can tweet next? Just be yourself. Have fun. This is fun. Why am I sweating? I need more coffee. Maybe I’ve had too much coffee. What day is it again? Oh, we’re (insert same number) of days away from the release of Minutes Before Sunset.

I’m not even kidding. This is my brain.

Welcome to authordom.

~SAT

24

Writing Tips: Holidays

5 Jul

As promised, I’m continuing writing tips, and today I am concentrating on the use of holidays in literature. No matter what culture you have or what country you live in, you probably celebrate holidays. I think this is a beautiful thing. Not only do holidays give us an opportunity to remember aspects of life like love, parents, or independence–they also allow us to dedicate the entire day to it. So why not use holidays in our novels to do the same thing?

Happy late Independence Day!

Happy late Independence Day!

There actually are reasons to NOT do this. They can easily come across as cheesy or distracting instead of symbolic. This brings me to my first rule:

Pick a Holiday Carefully: 

Holidays are often unnecessary, so choose carefully if you decide to use one. This is simply a personal preference, but I think holidays become something more when the author uses it in a symbolic manner rather than an event that simply happens. But I think that goes for an entire novel. All events should mean something within the plot, so why shouldn’t a holiday? For example, Minutes Before Sunset begins on Independence Day (Happy belated Fourth by the way!) I did this for three reasons:

  1. Irony: Minutes Before Sunset has a huge theme about fate and choice. Independence Day is…well…as it sounds: Independence Day for America–the setting of the novel. Because of this, it can symbolize the beginning of independence. It can also symbolize the opposite: lack of independence. This is what I’m talking about. The holiday now has two meanings. It fits the plot, and it fits whatever the reader wants it to be.
  2. Symbolic: Minutes Before Sunset is about the Light and the Dark. To me, this holiday involve a major ritual that is very light versus the dark: fireworks. I thought it represented the powers well, but it also represented Eric’s confusion in the beginning.
  3. Timing: it fit. Although I don’t want to admit this is a reasoning, because it seems to take away the meaning, it is, without a doubt, one of the biggest things authors have to consider. Does it fit your plot without straining the time or the characters? Use the holiday if it fits naturally. If it doesn’t, move on to my next topic. You may want to consider it 😀

Considering Creating Your Own Holiday: I think this is great in any kind of novel, not just sci-fi and fantasy. It can show a unique side to a character, family, or community, which, in turn, can create a more believable or relatable setting. This can also apply to creating a special event. Fun fact: Minutes Before Sunset has a “made-up” celebratory event: The Naming. This is when the shades receive their powers. I really enjoyed creating this, but, to my surprise, a lot of readers found interest in it as well:

Ky Grabowski wrote: “A part of the book I really liked was the naming ceremony that is held when kids turn of age to receive their powers. A big part of the Shade’s history. The ceremony is not all it’s shown to be with glitter and crowns. Eric shares his thoughts while watching it all unfold & he makes note that what was in store for the future was far from something to celebrate. They had responsibilities and a lot of pressure comes with that.” Read rest of her review here.

Basically: Holidays are great. That’s why there are entire books about them, like “A Dog Named Christmas” by Greg Kincaid.

Fireworks on the lake

Fireworks on the lake

I hope all of your writings are going well, and don’t forget that Goodreads Book of the Month, Minutes Before Sunset, is on sale for $3.89 (ebook) to celebrate the award! I’m also giving free copies away for review: email shannonathompson@aol.com

Available now on AmazonBarnes & NobleSmashwordsKoboDieselSony, and Apple.

~SAT

%d bloggers like this: