Tag Archives: quotes

#MondayBlogs Finding Your Author’s Voice

5 Oct

Intro:

Voice. A singular word that makes most writers cringe, especially if you’re just starting out. But it doesn’t have to! Finding your “voice” can be a fun adventure, and today, author Ryan Attard, is discussing the ever-dreaded topic most avoid.

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in guest articles are those of the author/s and do not necessarily reflect my own. To show authenticity of the featured writer, articles are posted as provided (a.k.a. I do not edit them). However, the format may have changed.

Finding your Author’s Voice by Ryan Attard

If you’ve been writing for any length of time, you would have come across the concept of an author’s voice – one of the most confusing concepts out there in terms of writer’s education. We hear it all the time, whether we are writing a book, talking about one, or even writing those dreaded query letters; readers, writers and agents alike are all seeking voice.

But what the hell is this thing?

Your voice is your identity as a writer; it’s what makes your words yours (barring some long and boring copyright agreement that I will not include here, because I’d like everyone to read this without feeling like they have to drive a long rush nail into their cerebral cortex afterwards).

Your voice is who you are; what makes you choose what words to write; or what drives you to write them in the first place. But without going all Flower Power, let’s talk about this from a technical perspective.

When you read an author, if they have found their voice, you will find yourself inevitably either loving or hating that author. There is very little middle ground here, simply because now you know what that author is all about. You know where they’re going to go, even if they get better – and that either jives with you or it doesn’t. This is what differs a pro writer from someone who’s just starting out. The reason why established authors tend to sell a bajillion copies of their work is because we as readers identify with that story – or rather the voice of that author in telling the story.

I know… no one said this was easy to wrap your head around.

Think of J.K. Rowling for example. Yeah, Harry Potter is a great story, and it’s got its ups and down, but the reason fans still go gaga over it years after the last book (and movie) ended is because of Rowling’s voice. We can all sit down and write the exact same story, with the exact same characters and mechanics (but no Time-turner cos that’s bullshit!) and we’d all end up with a slightly different story – better or worse. A more recent example is Patrick Rothfuss: story-wise there is little to engage us in his series. On face value it’s about a guy telling us about his past in a school. So why does it have raving fans (guilty as charged) clamoring for the third book, like a riot happening outside of Conan Doyle’s house when he literally threw Sherlock of a cliff? (okay, technically it was a waterfall, but that really doesn’t have the same punch does it?)

The point is, a massive success goes beyond the perfect plot. It takes an author who really knows themselves and who really knows not only what they are writing about but also who are they writing for, as well as why; all in addition to a great story.

Better yet, that great story has to fit your author’s voice. This is a rookie mistake (one that I am guilty of) – we see something on TV, or read something awesome, and be like “Hey, I can do that!”

No, you can’t. Or rather, you can, but expect it to go down the crapper at around page 17. Sure if you want to steal an idea, or a setting, or a trope, it’s all fair game. ‘Talent borrows, Genius steals,’ as Oscar Wilde said.

But whatever you do make sure it all fits with YOU – as an artist, as a creator. It’s common when starting out have an inconsistent voice. Think of it in this way: when we are children we hear all sorts of phrases and inflections and whatnot, and we simply imitate. And the only way we have of sifting through this chaos is by doing it even more, eventually eliminating what sounds unnatural to us.

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This is why most writers tell you to “keep writing” – this is why we have that 10,000 hours rule of thumb. The more you write, the more familiar you get with your author’s voice… or voices, cos there is no rule that say you can’t have multiple voices (cue Prozac joke here), just as there is no rule that says you can only write in one genre.

So how can you find your author’s voice? Well, you can write, write and then write some more… but there is a way to shortcut it – if you think about it.

Yeah, that’s the trick… think about it. Simply reread some of your stuff, analyze what you’re doing, and pick what sounds most natural. It takes time, sure, but more importantly it takes dedication and the willingness to go through with your crazy ideas (some of which you really need to write down).

And once you find your voice, you’re golden. Because whether you are writing the next bestseller, a query letter, or even a tweet, you will have identified yourself through your writing. I’ll end with this quote from Youtuber and fellow author Garrett Robinson (whose video inspired me to write this post. Highly recommend you checking it out here) who said:

“An author’s voice, once perfected, is more unique to them that their fingerprints.”

May you go forth and write according to the voices in your head,

Ryan Attard

Bio:

Ryan Attard is the author of the Legacy series, The Pandora Chronicles and, as of recently, Evil Plan Inc. When not tormenting his protagonists or ruling over his imaginary worlds, Ryan can be found within the confines of his house on an island far, far away, either geeking out about the latest book or manga chapter he read, or a television show he just finished watching.

He can also be found spewing his opinions and telling terrible jokes on his weekly podcast, The Lurking Voice podcast, which can be found through his website (although if you are easily offended you should definitely not listen).

He is also the kind of person who writes about himself in the third person.

Email: ryanattardauthor@gmail.com

Website: http://ryanattard.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Enkousama

Join the Mailing List and get an exclusive free copy of the Legacy Short Story Collection – 1 novella, 6 short stories and 50K+ words of pure awesome.  Sign up now!

Want to be a guest blogger? Now is the time to submit. I will be stopping guest blog posts in November, but before then, I would love to have you on! I am accepting original posts that focus on reading and writing. Pictures, links, and a bio are encouraged. You do not have to be published. If you qualify, please email me at shannonathompson@aol.com.

~SAT

Finding Interesting Quotes

10 Nov

Announcements:

Bookstore Browser reviewed Minutes Before Sunset, stating, “The book sets up a great world, with interesting characters and storyline as a great start to the trilogy.” Check out the entire review by clicking here.

Finding Interesting Quotes

Quotes. We love them. I rarely log onto any social media site without seeing some quote being shared via photos or tweets or simple statuses. We find a lot of meaning in quotes because we can relate to quotes, and being able to explain how we feel or think by sharing a line or two is a wonderful way to communicate with friends, family, and other followers.

One of the most wonderful times of being an author is when a reader quotes you. The first time I saw this happen, I could hardly believe it. I probably rubbed my eyes, closed my computer, reopened my computer, and blinked before I accepted that somebody had shared a few words of mine with the world. Now – it happens pretty regularly, and every time, I am just as happy as the first time. Why am I mentioning this?

Recently, a fellow author asked me how they could increase their chances of being quoted by their readers. Now – while I wish I could say there is a simple formula – I don’t know if there is, but I do know how you can find quotes in your own work that you can use for marketing purposes. So…here are a few ways to start your treasure hunt!

Figure out your themes:

I think this is the easiest way to find potential quotes in your own work. For instance, The Timely Death Trilogy revolves around the light vs. dark theme, but it’s also a romance, so I can search for words associated with that. Examples would include dark, shadows, love, hate, etc. This is handy because it serves two purposes: sharing a quote and sharing a theme from the novel. For instance, if I shared the favorited Seconds Before Sunrise quote, “Chaos within destiny. It was the definition of love.” it appeals to readers who might want to read about love, destiny, and drama. It’s also short enough to fit on Twitter.

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Read book reviews:

Readers will often point out their favorite quotes in book reviews. But – by the holy reading gods – do not respond to the book review. I think we all know how horribly that can go. While I generally let readers add quotes to Goodreads, this is a place where I’ve added a few quotes myself after a book reviewer shared one but didn’t add it. Book reviews can be a gold mine for finding quotes, but the only downside is the fact that you won’t have the quotes until after the book releases. If you need quotes beforehand, this method will have to be used later.

Google Yourself:

I know. I know. I just said that. But – seriously – I found photos people took and edited just for the quotes inside my novels. I even found quote websites and new social media websites where I could connect with readers. In fact, this is one of the reasons I ended up on Pinterest. When I searched for my name, most of the photos I found with my quotes on them were on Pinterest.

Now that you have quotes to use, use them! Create photos, tweet them out, post them on Facebook. There are plenty of ways to pick out those one-liners to share, but make sure you’re having fun with it! Create images, tweet out to readers, “like” photos fans create. Post them on your website!

There are no limitations to sharing words, and who knows who will share yours next?

~SAT

Writing the Back Blurb

8 Nov

Announcements: 

The Messy Owl reviewed Take Me Tomorrow, stating, “A thrilling and entangling plot, full of suspense and action.” Read the entire review here or check out my latest novel by clicking here.

Writing the Back Blurb

As I near the release date of Death Before Daylight, I remember more topics that I can talk about due to the tasks I must complete beforehand. Writing the back blurb is one of these tasks. Oh, yes. The dreaded back blurb. Everyone knows about the summary of text on the back of the book that convinces readers, “Yes. You want this book.” The scariest part relies on the fact that the summary is exactly that – something that could make it or break it for a reader.

The pressure.

So, I’m going to share how I write the back blurb by using Minutes Before Sunset as an example. First, I want to clarify that this is how I write one, and it may not be a method everyone should use. It also might come across as more complicated than it actually is, but that’s because I am breaking it down into five steps, even though – in reality – it feels like one when I’m writing the back blurb. I hope it helps those who are struggling with writing one!

1. Try to write a query letter

A query letter is even worse, right? But I like to start there because it forces me to summarize the novel in one or three sentences. Those sentences end up summarizing everything, but – more importantly – it forces me to get to the bottom of the message, the theme, and the genre. This allows me to focus on those things in the future. Set aside until step 3. (This is actually where I get my “Two destinies. One death.”)

2. Write a one-page synopsis

Oh, how painful this is. (Just kidding.) This is where I write whatever I want to. I explain the novel for as long as I like, and when I’m done, I slowly start to cut smaller parts out until I get it down to one page. Set aside until step 3.

3. Combine Step 1 and 2

This is where I combine everything. Look at the first two sentences you came up with and compare it to the synopsis. What matters the most? What catches your eye the most? What correlates and what doesn’t? Sure, it would be great to mention your favorite side character’s importance, but do they add to the theme more than the protagonist? That first step really helps me make the cuts I didn’t want to make in step 2. (This is where I get most of the information that will be found in the middle.)

The bubbles with numbers have been added, of course ;]

The bubbles with numbers have been added, of course ;]

4. Make it catchy

Once you get the information that you want, twist the sentences around. Think of the infamous Don LaFontaine’s “In a world” movie trailer voice. Or listen to epic music while you write it. Make it fit! Make it intense! Don’t hold back…until you step away for a day. I would warn against making it too epic – because that’s when many create a back blurb that is too abstract to understand – but keep some intensity while also creating some grounding for the reader to get. Step away for a day. Come back. Read it again. Make sure it sets up the reader’s expectations in the right place. For instance, you don’t want to mention love in the synopsis if love is barely in the book at all. That will only cause romance readers to pick it up, and they probably won’t be too happy with your novel if they expected something that ended up not being there. (This is where I add the quote. I add the quote at this point because it becomes my “dun dun dun” but it also helps me focus on the turning point of a plot – the main conflict, per se, and I like to set up the reader to know that for the trilogy.)

5. Edit. Get opinions. Edit again. But decide on it.

Just like a manuscript, get someone’s opinion about your blurb. Edit, and rewrite it, but don’t obsess forever about it. Eventually, you have to decide on something and turn it in. Talking to others might help you feel more confident about the back blurb. I would even go so far as suggesting getting an opinion from someone who had read the book and someone who knows nothing about the book. (This is also where I add the review quotes since I finalize the blurb.)

It’s over! You have your back blurb, and you’re ready to share it with the world. The only other thing I would mention is this: for series, I would suggest remaining consistent. Seconds Before Sunrise has the same parts that Minutes Before Sunset does – the slogan, the quote, the summary, and the review quote. Death Before Daylight will as well…which reminds me. If you want an ARC of Death Before Daylight for review, please email me at shannonathompson@aol.com. I will share your review right here and on my other websites as well!

And best of luck with your back blurb writing,

~SAT

Website Wonders

28 Sep

Announcements: 

In the latest review, The Bookie Monster highly recommends Take Me Tomorrow, and you can read why by clicking here. But here is small quote: “Once this story gets rolling, which is right in chapter one, you have to just keep turning the pages. It wasn’t my plan, but I read it in an afternoon.” If you want to check out my latest novel, click here for Amazon.

Website Wonders: 

Every month, I share all of the websites I come across that I find helpful, humorous, or just awesome. Below, you’ll find all of September’s Website Wonders categorized as so: Reading, Writing, and Inspiration Art and Life. Between each category is a photo. If you enjoy these websites, be sure to like my Facebook page because I share even more websites and photos like this there.

Enjoy!

Reading:

23 Science Books That Are So Exciting They Read Like Genre Fiction:

List of Newspeak Words from Orwell’s 1984: I’m a huge George Orwell fan, so this was really neat to read.

Which of the All-Time Top 100 Sci-Fi/Fantasy Books is Right For You?: I love, love, love this. It is so much fun to explore from various answers.

A Clever Visual Representations of Famous Quotes

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Writing:

How to Structure a Story: The Eight-Point Arc: A very basic way to start off writing if you want to study the structure of writing.

Free Landing Page Images: This was sent to me by CEO of Users Think, John Tuner, and it includes 99 free images for authors to use as covers.

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Inspirational Art and Life:

37 Photographic Proofs That Iceland is a Miracle of Nature: I found these to be both beautiful and shocking!

28 Magical Paths Begging to be Walked: Sent to me by reader, Steven Sanchez. (If anyone ever finds articles like this, please send them to me! I love them.) I found these photos to be a wonderful, mid-day escape.

24 Unusual Beaches You’ve Never Heard of Before: I’m stuck in Kansas, so this is what I end up looking for when I want to be on a beach.

DNA tests ‘prove’ that Jack the Ripper was a Polish immigrant named Aaron Kosminski: How could you not find this article fascinating? It might not be true – it might never be 100% solved – but the new evidence is pretty neat to read about.

This Man Found A SECRET Tunnel in His House. And It Let to a MASSIVE Underground City! What would you do in his position?

Have fun internet diving!

~SAT

Interactive Book Reviews for Readers and Authors

17 May

Shannon, here, for an announcement. Minutes Before Sunset was featured on Friday Fiction. You can read an 1,000 word excerpt by clicking here. The scene happens between Jessica and Eric, and it’s from a chapter told from Jessica’s perspective.

Now an introduction. Pau Castillo from Pau’s Castles has written a wonderful post about her technique behind her interactive book reviews. I believe this post is great for readers and authors, especially book bloggers who might be considering a new aspect to add to their websites. Using her interactive method allows readers to be both entertained and engaged while reading and reviewing. As an author, I highly recommend her reviews – but check her out for yourself. She’s stellar! Thank you for blogging here today, Pau.

Good day to all avid followers and readers of the lovely author, Shannon A. Thompson! My name is Pau, a 20-year-old blogger from the Philippines and I’m here to share you how I do my book reviews.

Before, I used to think the way I do my reviews is… quite typical. Or rather, I’ve never thought highly of it. I thought it was just right to do the things I do but, apparently, I’ve gotten some praises from other authors because of it. They appreciated my “notes for authors”.

So what are notes for authors? 

Well, as the phrase claims, it’s my portion of my review post that contains my notes for authors. Usually, it contains spoilers. Lots and lots of spoilers. Which is why it’s usually just for authors and not readers most especially if they haven’t read the book yet.

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Here’s a screenshot of my notes portion from my review for Shannon’s Seconds Before Sunrise.

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This photo is a photo I tweeted to Shannon to show her my current notes progress for her book. I was barely halfway and I had these much thoughts already! The notes jotted down here can be as random as “Oh gosh Eric is a lovely character! Can I marry him?”

The notes portion basically contains my thoughts as I read the novel. Usually, I take note of the pace, character development, plot development, plot twists, fan-girl moments (especially when I’m crushing over a character. In Seconds Before Sunrise‘s case, Eric Welborn) and, sometimes, grammar and redundancies. English is not exactly my first language so grammar is not usually something I deeply look into. As for ARCs, I also take note of possible typographical errors.

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Here’s a screen cap of Jasmine Carolina’s comment about my review. I greatly appreciated this one because, although I became a little technical with my notes, she still loved the review. Jasmine Carolina recently published her first novel called Losing Me, the first book of a trilogy. It was a great novel!

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Lastly, other than the notebook author notes, I also tend to live tweet to authors (with minimal or no spoilers at all) while reading their works. I personally like them to feel my actual emotions at the very moment I’m feeling them. Shannon and another author named Amber Skye Forbes (author of When Stars Die) loved the live updates.

Personal tip and conclusion

So basically, that’s it! For attempting book bloggers out there, you might want to consider jotting down your thoughts while reading a book and if you have a twitter account, you might want to live-update as well. It gives the authors the satisfaction and joy of knowing how we, the readers, truly felt while reading something they’ve surely worked hard on.

Thank you for reading!

——-

More about the blogger

Photo from Pau’s Castles

Photo from Pau’s Castles

Pau is a 20-year-old blogger from the Philippines. Her blog is mostly filled with book reviews but, once in a while, she inserts some random stuff like her life as a media student, the places she discovered, and the restaurants / food stalls that forever scarred her taste buds… in a good way. She is currently a fourth year college student taking up Advertising which is a course commonly known as a zombie virus in the world of her school. During her free time, she is mostly stuck with a book or attempting to be an artist by doing calligraphy.

You can contact her via:

Twitter: @pauscastles

Instagram: @pauscastles

Blog: http://pauscastles.wordpress.com

Email: pauscastles@gmail.com

You Have Committed Copyright Infringement

24 Feb

Three announcements before I talk about a REALLY important issue in the art industry that I recently – and very personally – experienced. Normally, this day is reserved for “Website Wonders.” But I have made an exception. You can expect February’s Website Wonders next time, but I hope you will read what I have to say today.

  • Inkwell & Paper reviewed Seconds Before Sunrise (book 2 of The Timely Death Trilogy) and you should read her full review to find out why she said, “Shannon A. Thompson will one day be a famous New York Times Bestselling author.
  • As if that review wasn’t marvelous enough – YA Book Reviews ALSO posted their review of Seconds Before Sunrise, because she “started this book today… and finished it today. This was the perfect addition to the first in the series. I loved the first one and found that I loved this one even more.” Read Aubrey Joy’s full review by clicking here.
  • And in case you’re just now checking in, don’t worry: The Book Babble interviewed me on the same page that the reviewed Minutes Before Sunset, the first novel of The Timely Death Trilogy. Click here to find out why I read medical journals or learn how my book is filled with imaginative characters, teen angst, teen romance, an intriguing plot, and parents who just don’t understand.”

Thank you to all three of these lovely readers.

So, today is going to be a rather serious day, because – as you can tell from the title – I will be writing about a legal issue: Copyright infringement. You know that little © inside the book? That. We’re talking about that, and we’re talking about that because it’s important for authors, writers, and readers. (I do not normally differentiate between writers and authors, but for the flow of this post, I am. Writers = unpublished, not copy written work, Authors = published, copy written work.)

If you follow my author Facebook page, then you already know what happened to me this week. I was emailed by one of my followers who then directed me to a few people who have used my quote in their recent writings – without my permission, without talking to me, and definitely without any label that told readers where the quote came from. In fact, they didn’t even put quotation marks around it. The writers have placed my quote inside their own prose and acted as if it is their own, violating the U.S. Copyright Law.

At first, I was shocked – I couldn’t believe it, but I couldn’t deny it either – and then I was mad – because I worked REALLY hard on my stories, but these writers caused their readers to think that my quote came from them – but, ultimately, I became overwhelmed with sadness, because I couldn’t fathom how a writer (who knows the struggles of writing) could do this to another writer (because authors are writers, after all.)

Aren’t we supposed to stick together? I know I try to help other writers, so that’s why I’m sharing my story. To be honest, I wasn’t originally going to blog about this, because I thought it was better to handle it in a silent matter, but I cannot stay silent because – sadly enough – this happens all too often. 

I’m sharing my experience because I need to. I do not want to get anyone in trouble, but it is difficult when someone is literally breaking the law by stealing what one owns. In fact, I’ve already taken measures with everything because I have to. I spent years writing my novels, and they were properly copyrighted for this exact reason. That is my right as an author, but I have to practice that right if it is going to mean anything. I cannot simply sit back and be “the bigger person” because that causes this to happen more and more and more. By sharing my story, I hope to show authors why they should take all necessary precautions in order to protect their work. I also hope to encourage readers to quote authors properly, but I REALLY hope that this post discourages writers who are blatantly stealing from others and acting as if it is their own. I will get to all of these points below.

Let’s start at the beginning:

If you follow my author Facebook page, then you saw this photo on Valentine’s Day:

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(Here’s the full quote, “I was falling in love with her, and she was falling in love with me. It was fated, decided before any of us were born, and I hated it as much as I loved it. I could barely stand it.” It can be found on Goodreads here. The reason I add the full quote is because the full quote is the one that was stolen.)

If I hadn’t posted this photo, I doubt I would’ve ever found out what had happened, because that picture is why my follower recognized the quote later on. This quote has been used on numerous websites in different books. Not just once. The writings were mainly fan fiction stories that are not focused on my novel or even my genre, but one person was charging for their story. On top of that, not a single person put quotations around my quote nor added a footnote that explained where my quote came from. Every single one was published AFTER Minutes Before Sunset was published as well.

Now, since I have already filed, it has been removed, but below is an image from a Google search that still shows one of them: (Just for clarification reasons: I am not trying to attack this person for using my quote, but it is an honest example. Please, do not harass them as I have already spoken with them.)

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You might notice that there was a very SLIGHT change in the quote. While I wrote “falling in love with her” this says “falling in love with him.” You will see another, similar instance below, where this writer simply changed the pronouns to names as well as first to third person:

india

Although Charles Caleb Colton once said, “imitation is the sincerest form of flattery”, I still feel very strongly about this as an issue that is wrong, not to mention a violation of the U.S. Copyright Office. You cannot change three words in an entire paragraph and claim it is yours. In fact, that is what is called “close imitation” and that is defined as plagiarism. On top of that, I do not understand why a writer who has already written books themselves would steal from an author at all. No one wins here. Writers won’t gain their own voice by stealing, readers won’t know who they are even a fan of, and authors will be giving up a piece of them for free because everyone tells them, “It’s nice that they look up to you.”

You know what is nice? It’s nice when they look up to you and share it with people – not steal. There is nothing “nice” about stealing. That’s like me telling my neighbor who’s house was broken into that it was “nice” because the robber was envious of their things.

It’s not okay, and we need to speak out about it instead of pretend it isn’t happening all over the World Wide Web, so here are some things to do:

For Authors Who Want to Protect Their Novels:

Take the necessary precautions. This means getting your novel copyrighted. This also means taking action when your copyright is violated. This could either be contacting the writer and asking them to either quote you or to remove it. Hopefully, it was a mistake. If they refuse to do either (or even ignore you) take action. File when your copyright is violated. On most writing websites, there’s a form right at the top. Please, do not sit back and allow people to use entire paragraphs from your stories by placing them in their stories. (Just for clarification, we are not discussing quoting someone on Twitter. We are discussing someone trying to pass your writing off as their prose.) If we sit back, it will continue to happen.

For Writers Who Want to Use An Author’s Quote in New Stories:

Go for it – WITH permission. Visit the author’s website, try to send the author an email, ask them if it is okay and/or how the author would like you to go about using it in your story. The author might be excited for you to use it as long as you use a footnote or some other identifier. Remember that authors are writers, too. They understand how long it takes to write a novel and how hard it can be. Most of us will want to help you. We just don’t want to be taken advantage of either. Mutual respect is the key. In fact, here’s this to help you: “How Do I Get Approval to Use Other People’s Quotes in my Book.”

However, if you continue to do this, I just want to add one thing from the U.S. Copyright Office, “Under certain circumstances, the infringement may also constitute a criminal misdemeanor or felony, which would be prosecuted by the U.S. Department of Justice.” There are criminal charges, but no one wants to do that to anyone. Stealing a few sentences isn’t worth it. You can write on your own. Just believe in yourself. 

In the end, this can be a sensitive issue, but we must face it together – writers, readers, and authors. Writers who have done this don’t want to get in trouble for it, but authors who have been victims of this don’t want to continuously be taken advantage of. As an author myself, I would help any writer who came to me and asked if they could quote me in their novel’s prose by either allowing something like a footnote or helping them find a way to word how they feel in their own words instead of just using mine.

We all share the same love for words. Just share the same love for each other.

~SAT

Minutes Before Sunset is on sale until book 2 releases March 27!

Minutes Before Sunset is on sale until book 2 releases March 27!

How Readers Surprise Me: Favorite Quotes

7 Feb

I first want to thank Cherry Mischievous for showcasing Minutes Before Sunset.  CM is a blog for the love of science-fiction and fantasy. Check it out for reviews, giveaways, and more!

Next, I want to thank Dames of Dialogue. I recently participated in an interview with them, which you can read by clicking here, and the interview actually begins today’s topic.

A little while ago, I announced on my Facebook Author Page that I had a new idea for blog posts. Since I do so many interviews with fantastic websites, I am often asked questions that make me stop and think. (And I love those questions!) For a long time, I’ve been wanting to share some of those questions and expand on them while also sharing the blogger that asked the question. This is my first attempt to do so.

Dames of Dialogue asked, “Do your readers ever surprise you by seeing something else in your stories than you think you wrote?”

My original answer was, “Readers surprise me the most when they pick out their favorite quotes. I’ve never been able to guess which combination of words would stick out the most, and it’s always a delightful gift when a reader lets me know what their favorite moment, character, or quote was.”

A favorite of November Snow readers - found on Meetville.

A favorite of November Snow readers – found on Meetville.

Now, to expand:

People love quotes. We see them as tweets, Facebook statutes, and underlined in novels. In fact, there are entire websites dedicated to sharing fantastic and new quotes to those looking for that perfect combination of words that describes how they feel. I like to think of a great quote like the perfect card to go with a gift (except the gift, in this case, is the novel.)

We all love those little gems – those sentences that make us stop, think, and grab a pen, so we can always return to it. As a reader, I often find myself going to Goodreads and “liking” my favorite quotes. As an author, I find myself looking at the quotes I have written that my readers have “liked” – and I’m surprised almost every time.

Currently, my readers’ favorite quote of mine is, “She was strong and stubborn but loving. She was an untouchable angel with a devil’s mark. She was beautiful.” from November Snow. I could have NEVER guessed that this would be a reader’s favorite, let alone the favorite of all favorites. You know why? Because this quote is about a minor character – one who is only seen in a flashback, one who has died a long time ago. I never thought this moment would be so impactful, but it ended up being one. As an author, I probably would’ve guessed a quote that had more symbolic meaning to the story, but I have to remind myself that readers will pick out what is symbolic to them in their lives.

In contrast, the number one quote “liked” from Minutes Before Sunset is “I was falling in love with her, and she was falling in love with me. It was fated, decided before any of us were born, and I hated it as much as I loved it. I could barely stand it.” This quote didn’t surprise me as much as the one from November Snow.

So, why discuss readers and quotes?

Because, personally, I want to be able to have as many moments that stop the reader as possible. I want them to love those little relatable moments. I want readers to pick up a pen and underline words. In fact, I want them to write all over my novel about their thoughts and emotions. I want them to interact and love the interaction. That’s why I am sharing a few tips about memorable quotes:

1. If you’re a reader, please take the time to credit an author (or novel) any time you share their quote. It means a lot to us. In fact, I found a Pinterest that quoted my novel just yesterday, and it made my afternoon that they took the time to share it. Plus, it helps us see what our readers like, and it might help us grow in our writing style. It also allows us to be able to Google and find you in order to send you a grateful “thank you” for reading and sharing.

2. If you’re an author, thank those readers who share your quotes. I actually have a Twitter album on my Author Facebook Page where I put Twitter pages who have quoted me, hoping to spread the word about their page. You know that great feeling you get when they share it? Readers get that same great feeling when you take the moment to thank them. (After all, I am also a reader.)

3. If you’re an author and you can’t find anyone using your quotes, be sure to share quotes you think your readers might enjoy. For instance, let’s pretend you’re a romance author. You can open up your novel and do a word search for words like “love” or “hate” and see if you wrote any sentences that really strike a nerve, even by themselves. Start sharing them on Twitter or add them to Goodreads. That way, when readers are searching for quotes, they can find them.

Quotes can help readers and writers in many ways – but I think the best part is how they can help us come together. When I’m at the library and I come across an underlined passage, I actually smile. I love seeing what someone else loved, and if I loved it, it makes me feel like I have a reader friend. Now, I know underlining books you don’t own is illegal, so I’m definitely not encouraging that. Instead, I’m saying that sharing those moments with others is a gift. It’s the gift of words.

~SAT

Check out my quotes :D

Check out my quotes 😀

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