Tag Archives: Shannon A Thompson

Kindle Unlimited, Audiobooks, & Giveaway!

20 Jul

As promised, even though I’m not blogging writing tips right now (though I am trying to work it back into my schedule), I’m keeping everyone updated. Today, you’ll find out how you can read both of my series for FREE—and there’s an awesome giveaway somewhere below. Let’s start with some news!

For the first time in my entire author life, I have seen my books placed in a library. These moments might seem super small, but they feel super huge to me. As a teen librarian myself, I know how important libraries are to a community. They are amazing. If you’re lucky enough to have one nearby, be sure to visit your local library. Make sure to request your favorite materials too, because most libraries will consider ordering them! We librarians love you for it.

Minutes Before Sunset (book 1 of the Timely Death trilogy) is officially available as an audiobook! If you watched the behind-the-scenes video, then I’m sure you’re excited. I’m placing it below again in case you missed it last time. The narrators, Sarah Puckett and Steve Campbell, are so talented. They truly brought the Dark to life. Check it out on Audible. I feel incredibly lucky to have dual narrators on this series. Want to win a copy? Keep reading! 

The Bad Bloods series and the Timely Death trilogy are now available through Kindle Unlimited. If you’re a Kindle Unlimited subscriber, you can read both series for free. This is a limited-time offer, so make sure to grab them while you can. I’m super excited to see these books reach more readers on a new platform!

In personal news, this year has been super hard, not going to lie. Sometimes I think it’s been the hardest year in regards to my writing. As many of you know, I’ve been struggling with some health issues, and my cat had cancer this year. Thankfully, my cat Boo Boo beat cancer. (YAY!) I wish I could also say I’m all better now, but I’m really just learning how to cope with everything better. Basically, (and I find it really hard to open up about these things), I’m not able to hold most food down. It’s caused major malabsorption problems. My Vitamin D levels were that of an 83-year-old at one point, which doesn’t sound like a big deal, but it made my bones really brittle. My hair started to turn bleach-white and fall out. (Not usual graying, which I would be cool with.) Whatever it is has caused a lot of issues. Despite visiting three gastroenterologists, a rheumatologist, and two physicians, (not to mention getting too many procedures and tests to count), I’m still without a set diagnosis. The current weeding-out diagnosis landed me on two auto-immune disorders, but living with auto-immune disorders means a set of diet and lifestyle experiments that haven’t worked for me yet. Right now, doctors have told me my next step is visiting a medical university, but my insurance won’t cover it, and the local medical university won’t see me unless I’m covered. So until I can get better insurance, I’m sort of at a loss. I’m trying to keep my hopes up. Some days are easier than others. But I am really sick of feeling so sick. Seriously, things are hard. (Okay. Whew. Not used to being so open.) In other news, I chopped off eight inches of my hair, which has been interesting to say the least. Taking some serious downtime for myself has been helpful. But that also means I don’t have publications prepared for the near-future. I am writing and editing manuscripts, though. As an update from last time, I’m almost finished with my historical fantasy, about 10,000 words into my YA sci-fi, and brainstorming more than one project now. I’m not giving up. ❤ In fact, if you’re subscribed to my newsletter, then you got to read an exclusive sneak peek at one of my WIPs! If you’re not subscribed but want to be, click here.

Instead of a sneak peek at one of WIPs today, you get to enter a grand giveaway!

By visiting any of my social media sites today, you can enter to win a free copy of the Minutes Before Sunset audiobook. All you have to do is like, share the post, and comment “Done” to win 1 of 5 copies of Minutes Before Sunset Audiobook. In fact, it starts now! Five readers today can like this article, share it, and comment below that you’ve done so, and you’ll be entered to win. Enter with more chances by visiting my Twitter (AuthorSAT), my Facebook page, and my Instagram!

Good luck!

~SAT

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Why I’m Not Blogging Right Now

22 Jun

Hey, folks! I know I’ve been absent from the blogging world for longer than ever since I began in 2012. Some of you might have noticed that I returned to social media (Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter), so I thought I’d post a short (okay, so I tried to make it short) explanation as to why I haven’t returned to my weekly writing tips posts.

Mainly, my schedule is still insane.

It’s easy to send out a tweet here and there. But writing 1,500-word blog posts every week? That takes a lot more time and energy that I simply don’t have right now.

I’m adjusting to my new job at the library. (I’m finally through training, which YAY!) I love it. It’s super fun, and I look forward to seeing where I go with it. But between working at the library and coming home to edit novels, (which I’m still doing btw; please don’t hesitate to contact me about my services), I have very little writing time for myself. And my writing time needs to come before blogging. If you’re interested in what I’ve been up to at the library, here are two displays I created for my branch: Juvenile Fiction for Spring: April Showers and May Flowers, and Travel the World with YA.

Also, unfortunately, I’m still having health issues. Some people on the blogosphere are super comfortable getting into details about these things, but I’m not, and I hope you understand. I will say this, though. I’ve been getting a lot of tests done. I’m actually working with three different doctors right now, and waiting to get into yet another specialist soon. Not knowing exactly what is wrong or how to fix it is a major stressor in my life, and my energy levels have been nearly zapped between work, editing, and being sick. Not to mention how expensive health care is in the US right now. I promise I’m working at getting better though. But again, my health has to be a priority.

With all that being said, I don’t think I’ll be blogging on the regular any time soon, but I promise to keep everyone updated as much as possible.

In other news…

The LitUp Festival went amazing! I mean, check out that fan art of Serena and Daniel from Bad Bloods. My teen interviewer was super nice and extremely brave for being part of a teen-run festival. I had a blast!

The Bad Bloods: November Snow audiobook narrated by Jonathan Johns released! You can get it everywhere books are sold. I hope you enjoy the conclusion of the first duology.

I’ve also had the privilege of listening to the Minutes Before Sunset audiobook narrated by Sarah Puckett and Steve Campbell, and it’s AMAZING. It should release soon, so keep your eyes open. ❤ If you’ve ever wondered what it takes to record an audiobook, watch this behind-the-scenes video! It’s super neat.

Cancer-free kitty

My favorite news? My cat Boo Boo beat cancer this week. We found out he had thyroid cancer a few months ago, and he’s been battling it with treatments for a while now. He had surgery once it was small enough, and then we got his blood re-tested, and he’s cancer-free. He may be 16, but he’s one tough cat. I’m super happy about that.

In writing news, I’m officially working on three books. I’m editing/rewriting my first YA historical, first drafting a YA sci-fi, and brainstorming/outlining a YA fantasy. No publications coming up, but I hope you understand. ❤ I’m really enjoying taking some time to write just for me. But I am looking forward to sharing these novels one day!

Oh, and I turn 27 tomorrow. Crazy, right?

As always, I hope all of you are doing well.

Stay in touch.

~SAT

YA Scavenger Hunt Spring 2018!

3 Apr

Welcome to the YA Scavenger Hunt! 

Hello! I’m Shannon A. Thompson—young adult author, blogger, and poet. Every Saturday, I share writing and publishing tips right here. I also love to talk about books.

Fun fact: I recently found out I’ve been nearsighted my WHOLE life, so this is my first year seeing everything!

About Me!

  • I’m addicted to coffee, KDramas, and Sailor Moon.
  • During the day, I work as a Youth Librarian, but at night, I write stories about monsters and mayhem.
  • I have three cats that I call my little gremlins.
  • I became an aunt this year!
  • On May 12, I will be signing books, talking on panels, and teaching poetry at the LitUp Festival in Independence, Missouri for the Mid-Continent Public Library! Check it out.

I’m on TEAM BLUE this year.

Searching for my exclusive bonus content? You’ll have to keep searching.

Somewhere on this blog hop, you can read a never-before-seen preview of Bad Bloods: October Bone (#5). That’s right. You will get to see a piece of Skeleton and Ameline’s story…and I must warn you, the title has a huge hint as to how dreary their duology will be. You can also enter to win a signed copy of any of my books below. Before you go looking for it, check out the amazing author I’m hosting. (JUST WAIT UNTIL YOU SEE HER NOVEL’S COVER.)

But maybe you need the rules first.

Scavenger Hunt Prize Rules

Directions: Below, you’ll notice that I’ve hidden my favorite number. Collect the favorite numbers of all the authors on the BLUE TEAM, and then add them up. (Don’t worry, you can use a calculator!)

Entry Form: Once you’ve added up all the numbers, make sure you fill out the form here to officially qualify for the grand prize. Only entries that have the correct number will qualify.

Rules: Open internationally, anyone below the age of 18 should have a parent or guardian’s permission to enter. To be eligible for the grand prize, you must submit the completed entry form by April 8, at noon Pacific Time. Entries sent without the correct number or without contact information will not be considered.

If you’d like to find out more about the hunt, see links to all the authors participating, and see the full list of prizes up for grabs, go to the YA Scavenger Hunt page.

Now that we all know the rules, please welcome…

I am super excited to be hosting…

LM Preston!

About LM Preston: Preston was born in Washington, DC. She loved to create poetry and short-stories as a young girl. She has an obsessive desire to write and create stories of young people who overcome unbelievable odds.

About Insatiable Darkness:

EmVee didn’t know what to think about this new town her father’s passion for boxing lured them. It was an unlikely location for her to pursue her dream of going semi-pro. Just when she started getting used to the school with gorgeous jocks and strange cheerleaders, the depth of the danger her father’s choices dangled them in front of became clear. EmVee hoped Silas and Kayson will be able to help her uncover the mystery identity of the person who is threatening her family. The question is, will she survive to expose the mystery. [Pre-quel, Vigilant Series, Caged Fire Book 1: Coming Fall 2018] Check it out on Amazon!

Exclusive Character Interview:

Q. Welcome to my blog, EmVee! That’s a strange, but catchy name. What does it mean?

A. (Laughs) I guess it is, but my middle name is Emily and my first name is Vida. My mom always calls me Emily since she picked that name for me. I never liked it, so I combined it.

Q. You are rather tall, how old are you?

A. I’m Seventeen, turning 18 this year since I’m a senior in High School.

Q. Do you have a boyfriend?

A. Well, I don’t usually have time to be in a relationship, but this year, I’m falling for a guy. He’s a singer and a football player, did I tell you he is way taller than me?

Q. Did you just move here to Rhode Island?

A. Yes, my father moved us here to open up his first full service MMA gym. My mother is his partner and one of the best trainers in the world. She is training some of the star athletes here.

Q. Have you met any new friends?

A. A few. A girl named Rachel and I are besties. There is this other girl named Megan, I guess I’d call her a frenemy. Seriously though, she’s okay, just strange.

Q. What do you like to do for fun?

A. I go to the gym to train. I was on the path to becoming a semi-pro boxer like my mother. When I’m not there, I like running.

Q. So are you an only child?

A. No, I have a brother just under me in age, and twin brother and sisters that are freshmen.

Q. Well what do you have to say about your new hometown?

A. It’s strange, but has the most beautiful people I’ve seen in my life that wasn’t on TV. I just want to fit in and enjoy my Senior year. Peace out!

Thank you for coming on, LM Preston!

Doesn’t EmVee sound great? I like running, too. The last time I ran was 23 days ago! I suggest running with that information and entering the YASH contest for a chance to win a ton of books by me and many more! Just check out all these awesome titles on the BLUE TEAM!

Need a suggestion to start? Check out Body Parts by Jessica Knapp or Submerge by Tobie Easton! I loved them.

To enter, you need to write down my fav number, and find all the other numbers on the BLUE TEAM, add them up, and you’ll have the secret code to enter for the grand prize!

Exclusive Giveaway!

Thank you so much for stopping by! While you’re here, don’t forget to enter the Rafflecopter bonus contest I am hosting exclusively during the YA Scavenger Hunt. One lucky reader will win a signed copy of ANY of my books. They will also win signed swag from both of my series. Good luck!

Enter this Rafflecopter for your chance to win.

Ready to move on to the next link in the hunt? Then head on over to visit author Melanie Hooyenga’s page.

LINK TO NEXT BLOG

Shaming the Ship

20 Jan

If you’ve ever attended a movie premiere or book signing, you’ve probably heard someone squeal, “I totally ship them!”

I admit, the first time I heard this was at Cassandra Clare’s book signing in Kansas City over a year ago…and I was super confused. “Ship?” I thought. “Like a boat?” So here I am, picturing Dido singing, “I’ll go down with this ship.” Which, in retrospect, kind of works with today’s lingo. But at the time, a cosplaying Shadowhunter kindly explained to me what she meant, and I still dig her for it.

For those of you who don’t know, “ship” is short for “relationship.” Saying you “ship” a couple means you love those two characters being together. Yes, even when they’re sailing on boats. (Excuse me for my poor humor.) Fans can ship a couple that is actually together in the story or characters you wish were together. The term largely started in fandoms and fan fiction.

Is there a better photo for this article? I think not.

I’m totally for shipping whoever you want. I think it’s so much fun, even when I see people point out ships that are purely imagined. In fact, I’ve come across some ships that I had never even considered, but thought were awesome. (*cough, cough, Elsa and Jack Frost, cough cough*) It’s fan fiction heaven. That being said, there is always a negative side.

Recently, I’ve started to see people say things like, “If you ship those who aren’t together in the story, you’re a bad fan,” or “If you ship X and X, you promote abuse,” or blah blah blah.

Listen, I think it’s great to debate aspects of fiction, like how abuse is displayed. But “debate” is the keyword here. Just because one person feels a certain way about a character does not mean everyone should feel that way. One of the best parts of fiction is how malleable it is. A dynamic character could be seen differently by millions of people. Not to mention that fiction itself is fiction. Just because something criminal happens in a show does not mean it was criminal in the context of the show. Example? Take post-apocalyptic fiction. If it’s the end of world, and you see someone stealing from a store (or even killing another person), you automatically sympathize because survival, right? But if that character was doing that in our world, they’d be a bad person. In the context of a post-apocalyptic situation, the moral paradigm has shifted. Does that make anyone bad or good? That’s up for debate. *wink*

Sometimes, fiction is just fiction. Sometimes, a ship is something we sail on. It doesn’t have to have double meaning or be scrutinized beyond the fact that it’s purely entertaining. Just because a fan ships a couple on a show doesn’t mean they would ship them in a real-life situation. As an example, I thought I’d discuss a movie (hopefully) everyone has seen by now. If you haven’t, don’t worry. Just go to the next bolded line.

Spoilers for The Last Jedi beyond this point:

So, as many of you know by now, there was quite the shift in Kylo Ren and Rey in the last movie. Though nothing traditionally romantic happened (i.e. kissing), many felt their relationship was romantic in nature. Where it goes, no one knows, but that doesn’t stop the fandom from drawing photos, posting theories, and just plain ol’ fan girling.

Do I ship them? Yes and no. To me, I find their dynamic fascinating, which—as someone who is here to be entertained—is all I want in a story. So, yes, I love what happened between them in The Last Jedi, because I never saw it coming, yet it was believable, twisted, and exciting. But no, I wouldn’t encourage that sort of dynamic in real life.

Basically, if my best friend came to me and said, “This masked guy chased me through the woods as I shot at him, and then he knocked me unconscious and tried to read my mind. Later, I scarred him, and he killed his dad, but now we have a universe connection.” I would definitely not ship it. I would call the police. But Star Wars isn’t my best friend. Star Wars is a space opera. It’s not functioning on our moral constructs. In the setup of the fictional universe, you’re literally talking about a dark side and light side colliding in a space war. Of course unhealthy moments are going to happen. Does that mean you can’t enjoy the story? Maybe. Maybe not. If that ruins the story for you, that’s fine. If you want to debate it, go for it! But I draw the line at fans telling other fans what they can/should/want to enjoy.

Spoilers End

If you dislike a ship (or a story), by all means, we’re all allowed to our opinions, but I will always draw a line on those who shame others for enjoying (or disliking) a piece of fiction.

We’re here to be entertained and to have fun, and yes, there are times for debate. Yes, those debates are super important. I’m not telling you to stop debating. In fact, one of my favorite all-time quotes is, “The history books will tell what happened, but the art will tell them how we felt about it.” (Jermaine Rogers.) Debating art is society trying to encapsulate how they feel about current and past issues. Debating fiction is a natural response. All I ask is that we respect one another while we debate. No name-calling. No ship-shaming. Just a couple of fans having a reasonable discussion about how we feel about certain stories. Then, at the end of the day, we can enjoy our fandoms and sail off into the sunset on our preferred ships without trying to sink others.

Who are some of your favorite ships? (Actual boats allowed.)

~SAT

When A Character Does Something You Dislike

13 Jan

I read a lot. I also read reviews, though I tend to read reviews after I have read a book myself. Why? Well, I used to rely on reviews to pick books, but now I tend to rely on a trusted few (and my own gut) to pick and choose. Even so, my interest in reviews never completely faded, so I tend to set time aside after I finish reading to skim book reviews.

One of the reasons I stopped reading book reviews was the obsession with tearing characters apart.

Don’t get me wrong. Characters are so, so important in fiction. However, I think many have forgotten that characters are supposed to reflect real-life people. They aren’t supposed to be perfect. They shouldn’t do things you agree with on every page. They will make mistakes, even mistakes that seem ridiculous to you.

Sometimes, your hero isn’t going to act very heroic.

Staying on the path of “when characters make mistakes that seem ridiculous to you”: As the reader, you might know more than the character. Or you might understand the tropes of your genre, so you expect certain things to happen (ex. a best friend’s betrayal, a love triangle admission, a mentor figure’s sudden death). However, to that character, they live in a world that doesn’t come with trope warnings (just like we don’t). So when their best friend betrays them and they’re shocked (and you’re not), I don’t think it’s fair to call that character stupid or naïve or etc. Even with dozens of clues, that character loves their best friend. They trust their best friend. As humans, we often lie to ourselves when the truth is looking us in the face. We make mistakes.

As much as characters are designed to entertain, they are also designed to be honest, ugly, thought provoking, loving, twisted, and more. In fact, if you design a character really well, they will be all of those things—sometimes in one scene.

As an example, I recently finished Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy, and holy hell, I love it. I thought the voice was so honest, even though Dumplin has some seriously shallow thoughts. This was the main complaint I saw in reviews. Many called her hypocritical and hard to cheer on. And guess what? Of course she’s hypocritical. Of course she’s hard to cheer on sometimes. And that’s what made her believable. Dumplin’ is a teenage girl struggling with how the world judges her weight. Between that and the recent death of her beloved aunt, her contemptuous relationship with her mother, and her first (confusing) summer fling, I completely understood and sympathized with Dumplin’s emotional struggles. Does that mean I agreed with everything she did and said in every scene? Hell no! But I don’t have to agree with a character in every scene to love them in the end.

How many times has your sister annoyed you, bothered you, done something you thought was incredibly thoughtless? How about your parents? Your grandparents? Your best friends? But you still love them in the end. You give them second chances. You let go of the idea that everyone in your life must take your advice to heart. You understand everyone lives their own life their own way, and that sometimes you won’t agree with it, but that no one needs your approval. In fact, how many times have you done something that wasn’t perfect? How many times have you done something out of character? I know I’ve disappointed myself before. I still do. I’m human. I have moments of selfishness, of jealousy, of anger, of irrational depression. But does that make me worth tearing apart? I would hope not.

I expect characters to disappoint me at some point. I try to sympathize with flaws, but also understand that some flaws are going to be out of my realm. I cheer them on when they’re good and hope they redeem themselves when they’re bad. (And sometimes, I enjoy a good story where a character is never redeemed.) All I ask for is consistency—a sense that, no matter what the character does or believes, I understand them in that moment, even in the moments where they aren’t quite themselves. I need to believe they are real, and if I can believe that, I will more than likely enjoy the journey.

In the end, I want to enjoy the story—and sometimes, stories are told by those you might not understand. Maybe even by someone you would hate. But that doesn’t automatically mean the story is unlikeable.

Let’s be a little kinder to characters, especially character flaws.

We all have them.

~SAT

Setting 2018 Writing Goals

6 Jan

Now that we’re a week into 2018, you’ve probably set new goals and you’re already striving after them. And that’s awesome! But I made a huge mistake while setting goals last year, and I thought I’d discuss it, so you don’t make the same mistake I did when you tackle your writing life this year.

So what happened? Last year, I set three goals (and failed them all), which you can read about here, but I thought I would focus on the goal of connecting with a literary agent. While I definitely spoke to a number of talented folks, I never quite found “the one.” I felt like a failure. But did I fail? I mean, I connected with amazing people! I finished manuscripts. I learned. I revised. I resubmitted. I never gave up. And doors are still open for me, even today. So, I shouldn’t have felt like a failure. I should’ve felt proud, because, even though I didn’t walk away with the shiny new contract, I walked away with more knowledge, connections, and opportunities.

Extra tip: Keep a planner to stay on track, but don’t plan too far ahead. That way, you can adjust if need be.

Where I went wrong: Setting the goal of “I will get a literary agent” was unrealistic. Why? Because it depended on another person, and that person is largely out of my control. Yes, I can always write more and better—and yes, I could always spend more time making connections—but just because you have a great book or idea or following or etc. does not mean you’ll find the right person to represent you and your work. Do I have room to grow? Always. But so do many repped authors. Signing that contract is a largely personal decision from both sides. This goal depends on two people, not just me, so while having the goal to connect with an agent is fine, my goal shouldn’t have been “get a literary agent by the end of the year.” It should’ve been “I will submit my work to # of agents who enjoy my genre” or “I will spend X hours a week researching the industry, so that I am more prepared to query next time around.”

Basically, I learned to set realistic and fair goals. What do I mean by that? Goals should revolve around work you can accomplish, not how others react to your work.

Common, unrealistic publishing goals: How large your advance is, how many copies of your books are distributed, how well something sells (because, seriously, even experts can’t predict why books resonate), and publishing contracts in general.

Solution? Set goals to learn, write more, and submit, submit, submit. Examples: I will read fifty books this year, I will write 10,000 words every week, I will try to connect with new beta readers by this spring, I will submit my manuscript by July, etc. But remember, publishing isn’t a race. While goals should keep you moving, they aren’t meant to be hard deadlines. If you find out you can’t write 10,000 words a week, that’s fine. Do what you can. Never let your goals hurt you. For example, “I will get a publishing contract by December” might negatively impact you, because you’re going to submit when you’re not ready just to meet a deadline you alone set. If you make a goal to meet something by January, don’t beat yourself up if you end up needing to extend it to February. Just make sure you’re ready. You can always edit your goals…and set completely new ones.

In fact, when I really think about it, I set goals all year around.

Whether its spring or fall, rain or shine, I’m constantly considering what I want to do next and/or how to accomplish it.

Actually, I’ve met two goals this year already.

  1. The Timely Death trilogy will be an audiobook with duel narration!
  2. I resubmitted a revised manuscript.

All goals take a lot of time and energy, and I’m really proud I’ve accomplished these two goals. Where those paths will take me, I have no clue, but I am ready to set more goals and move forward in a realistic and positive way.

What are some of your goals for 2018?

~SAT

2017’s Top Ten Articles

30 Dec

Every year, I like to look back and see what everyone was discussing. I try to collect the best discussions and revisit them, so here’s a list of this year’s most popular articles. Normally, I would’ve made this list based on a combination of unique views, comments, and shares, but I didn’t track that as well this year, so it’s only based on unique views. But I hope you enjoy them!

1. The YA Protagonist’s Age: You’re 17? Me Too! 

I’m not going to lie, I’m a bit surprised this was my most viewed 2017 article. But I’m really happy more writers and readers are discussing the lack of variety in the ages of our characters, especially in YA. Teens go through many issues at different times, and it time our stories reflect that.

2. Is Romance Necessary in YA?

Another article focusing on young adult fiction, I discussed whether or not a story HAD to include a romance. While the answer might seem obvious and simple, this conversation is actually a lot more complicated than I wish it was. Sex sells, after all. Yes, even in YA.

3. My Hate-Love Relationship with Historical Fiction

This year, I began writing my first historical novel, and the journey reminded me of my struggles as a viewer/reader/consumer when it comes to historical fiction. I want historical fiction to push boundaries, but that will take a brutally honest conversation about what we understand of history and why we interpret it the way we do.

4. When Writing Makes Reading Hard: a guest post by Susannah Ailene Martin

One of the only guest posts I hosted this year! (Honestly, y’all, if you want to guest post, I always consider thoughtful topics such as this one, so please feel free to message me.) Here’s one writer’s story about how writing can cause writers to struggle with reading.

5. First Person or Third Person? Present Tense or Past Tense? How Do You Decide? 

Choosing how to tell your novel is a personal decision, so how do we make those decisions? This is how I choose tenses and POV, along with some tips to help you decide.

I’m so ready for 2018!

6. Book Marketing Woes

We all have them: book marketing woes. This is a list of common woes, like “I don’t have time,” and actual solutions to help you overcome the issue.

7. I DNF a Book

As an avid reader, I often feel guilty when I’m halfway through a well-written book…and just not connecting. This year, one of my goals was to be easier on myself and allow myself to set down books I wasn’t enjoying, so that I could spend more time reading novels I love.

8. Authors Can Change Their Mind

Five years ago, I wrote an article that was strongly against sex in YA…and now? Well, I haven’t completely changed my mind, but I’ve lightened my stance. Basically, authors can change their mind. This is an article about how we grow overtime.

9. Not All Villains Think They’re Good

“All bad guys think they’re the good guy in their story” has become a popular writing tip, and while I love this writing tip, I push back a little. Find out why.

10. My Editing Process Starts in my Writing Process

Editing is the hardest part of writing, but you can make it easier on yourself by setting yourself up for success early on. Here’s how.

I hope you enjoyed 2017 and all the articles that came with it!

If there are any topics you want me to cover in 2018, feel free to let me know in the comments below.

I’m always here to help.

Onward to 2018!

~SAT

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