Tag Archives: what’s it like to be a writer

#MondayBlogs All You Need (as a writer)

14 Dec

Intro:

Being a writer isn’t a decision for many. You just are. Still, it takes a lot to decide to be true to you and your work. Today’s guest blogger knows this lesson all too well. Ken Hughes, an urban fantasy author, discusses the truth behind what it takes to be an author—and how to stick with it.

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in guest articles are those of the author/s and do not necessarily reflect my own. To show authenticity of the featured writer, articles are posted as provided (a.k.a. I do not edit them). However, the format may have changed.

All You Need (as a writer) by Ken Hughes

ken.jpegWhen I wake up, I step outside and leap hundreds of feet up to float above the city.

–Alright, it’s my character who does that. But I’m the one who gets to capture the sensation of Mark kicking away from gravity, hanging in the night sky, and staring around for a certain suspicious owl that might glide out of the moonlight above.

And it can be frightening… just how much I love that storytelling. But I think I’m starting to understand, how that passion is the best key there is to living as a writer.

As a career, writing is its own special kind of hard. Half the people you meet they’re working on a book, but nobody can help you in the trenches. It means

  • discipline – to keep at it for years and years in the hope that something gets better
  • choices – every scene, in fact every word, is your responsibility
  • doubt – never being sure you’ve gotten the tale to the level you want
  • and the twist: after all that time locking yourself in the basement, you have to come outside and SELL total strangers on your work. Seriously?

But what I think is, it all needs to come from the joy of the right story.

Because of one key:

“I only write what I can love.”

Prison or Prize?

Let’s accept one thing: writing is not an easy way to make your fortune, or even your fame.

Sure, there are plenty of comfortably-paid writers in the world, especially in the digital age. But If your goal is really to combine “cool stuff about what I read” with leaving your day job or having a boatload of eager fans, the time it takes to write one novel (long before you know what you’re doing) can get you on your way to making a world-class blog, a dozen clever apps, or an FX apprenticeship where you can get your fingertips onto making the magic happen. If that’s what you want, for cat’s sake follow that dream!

Writing is the way to chase those thrills where you have to reinvent everything, word for word, in many ways from scratch. (Not in all ways, luckily.) So if you write, it should be because you don’t just love spy stories, you love deciding how your spy scouts an area and the exact moment her lips quirk into a smile.

And… there is no secret, no plan or key that can change how a writer needs to spend hundreds of hours simply writing. All with no help, no shortcuts, doing nothing except putting the next word down. To many people, that sounds like a prison sentence, and it’s meaningless if it isn’t lifelong.

But that works both ways:

If you know your story is the exact kind of “leap to the sky” that you want to be writing, those hours become something very different. They mean that for the rest of your life, any time that isn’t locked down paying bills or doing laundry can go right back to writing in your own world—and nothing can take that away. All you need is a notepad and five minutes (thirty seconds if it’s jotting down a sudden idea) to get back to your happy place. It’s an exhilarating discovery.

And, it’s the best way to make the story better.

At least, it is if you’ve made that place your own.

Defining Your Bliss

We all come into writing through other writers and other stories. Since that’s what first inspires us, it makes a certain sense that it might also be the source of a few of our problems. That is, if we to learn too much of the wrong lesson from one of our heroes.

I can’t get enough of Brandon Sanderson’s sprawling worlds or Joss Whedon’s talent for maintaining a whole roster of Avengers… but I don’t want to write that crowded a story. I’d kill to produce one page as poetic as Patrick Rothfuss’s, but it’s not what my tales are about.

If you love witty dialog—write that. Learn what makes it sparkle, how to pick and choose so you aren’t just copying one writer’s style, and keep writing that. Learn to get all that annoying description out of the way with just enough to do the job, or maybe the right touches to make your banter even better. And then you know that every day, what you have waiting for you is a chance to write more wit.

If you want the ultimate romantic lead, go for it. Work out what makes him/her perfect for your protagonist… and just what kind of stylized or silly or traumatic conflict to play off of that to turn it into a STORY worth sweating over. All the rest of the tale is only a basic foundation for that.

Myself, the more I understand how much I savor the sheer suspense of pushing Mark and Angie to the brink in a fight or a round of cat and mouse, the more I look forward to the next chance I get to write. And the better my scenes get.

Discipline? The next struggle in the book calls to me to get in there and write it. In fact, each time I sit down and discover that, yes, what I’ve got waiting is another glorious twist on how my poor heroes have to master their magic, the easier it is to trust that the next session will be playing to my strengths too. (Which is what “discipline” really means: not pushing through resistance but training yourself until the right action becomes the natural one.)

Choices? Because I can put my finger on what I want to write, I can test and study what makes good suspense and how many other pieces a story needs to make that work. Plus it means I can track one of Sanderson’s brilliant battles or the terror in The Blair Witch Project and call it “research.”

Doubt? There’s always further I can go, but at least I know what I’m trying to do, and how good I’ve already gotten at it. And, bouncing my work off of writers and readers means I’m hearing from people who have the same love of a good magical thrill.

Even the writer’s great Introversion/Promotion Paradox turns out to be not so different from the rest of the process: it’s still learning to zero in on what sets me on fire. After all my years locked in with my books I never thought “marketing” and “networking” could be words I’d want to be in the same room with, but it’s true. All I need is to pick which piece of adventurous awesomeness to mention first, and let my excitement show. (And like every other aspect of writing, learn a few other basics to support them—but really only a few.)

In fact, the two top pieces of advice I’ve found about a writing career are, “write better” and “write more.” Tapping into my own excitement is the best—almost the only—way to put more time into writing, and that time plus my clearer focus and related studies are just the thing to raise my game. (Bonus: there’s a word for a writer’s sense of just which kind of fun we write and share: that much-sought-after thing called a “brand.” Sometimes everything falls into place.)

Writing isn’t for everyone. But if it is for you, and you find the kind of writing you can commit to, those hours and years of work can become kind of experience you need them to be. There’s a good chance some day you’ll have people lining up to share your own kind of excitement. And yes, you might enjoy it as much as the scribbling.

But, your fans will still understand when you have to step away again. Just tell them you have to get back to sending your hero onto his next leap to the sky.

–Ken Hughes

ken2Author Bio:

Ken Hughes is a writer on a mission to hone the sharpest suspense, most gripping adventure, and most desperately human heroes in urban fantasy. For a peek at what he’s doing and why, take a look at www.KenHughesAuthor.com.

Want to be a guest blogger? Now is the time to submit. I would love to have you on! I am accepting original posts that focus on reading and writing. Pictures, links, and a bio are encouraged. You do not have to be published. If you qualify, please email me at shannonathompson@aol.com.

~SAT

#SATurday: How I Feel About Releasing My Novel

4 Jul

How I Feel About Releasing My NovelScreenshot_2015-06-08-08-30-15

Happy 4th to all you Americans out there! Before you start shooting off fireworks, I thought I’d share a funny little article. As many of you know, my novel—Minutes Before Sunset—releases this month. EEK! And Minutes Before Sunset begins on Independence Day. In fact, Independence Day plays a HUGE role in The Timely Death Trilogy. You know, light vs. dark and all that firework jazz. (Not to mention a certain death…but moving on.)

We’re getting so close to the release date of Minutes Before Sunset, and my silly feelings are all over the place. I’m nervous. Actually out-of-my-mind nervous.

But, Shannon, haven’t you released books before? In fact, haven’t you released these exact books before?

Yes. I have. And that doesn’t change a single little thing. My nerves are still on fire, and even though that sounds like another fireworks metaphor, I mean it more like my heart has been beating so fast that I’m hot. And in the sweaty way. Not in the wet T-shirt sort of way. (…Can I even say that? I don’t even know.)

As an author, I think many expect us to get used to these nervous feelings. In fact, I think I always thought authors probably adjusted too. But now that I am an author, I’ve realized the nerves just change from instance to instance. For example, when my first novel—November Snow—released in 2007, I was nervous, but I believe I was also in shock and a little embarrassed to even tell anyone. I was still in high school, after all, and my experiences in high school weren’t exactly popularity and parties. I basically kept my novel to myself, aside from a few students and a couple teachers supporting me here and there (and one teacher even blatantly telling me they didn’t support me). So, my first novel’s nerves were raw nerves, nerves I didn’t even know how to feel since I didn’t know what to expect. Fast-forward six years to the original release of Minutes Before Sunset and those feelings were quite similar. I had been out of the game long enough that the industry had flipped completely. We’re talking the Kindle released and self-publishing boomed. I was starting over all over again. Now that two years have passed since then, and I’m on this release, I’m nervous about many different things. So I thought it’d be fun to try to show a somewhat accurate version of how nervous feelings takeover my thought process. This is probably an average day for me.

Okay. July 28. It’s (insert number) of days away. Right? ::checks calendar for the umpteenth time like I could possibly forget the release day:: Right. You remembered. It’s (insert same number) of days away. And on that day, the new version will release. Oh, god. It’s releasing.

Will original readers like this new version? I love the new cover. It even has new editing and typography inside. The format for thoughts and telepathic communication are even different, something original readers suggested. Maybe they’ll notice? Maybe no one will notice. I hope they notice. Wait. How will I even know if they notice?

Will new readers try the trilogy? Am I doing the right thing by re-releasing the trilogy again or am I losing readers who wanted something new? What should I give readers next and when would they want it? Wait. Concentrate on what you’re doing now. Sales? Should I worry about sales? Reviews? Will reviews be different this time around?

How will readers like the last book? I’m so glad Death Before Daylight is finally getting its chance to release. Wait. What if the world ends before September 15 and no one gets to read Death Before Daylight? Well…then, I guess you have bigger problems. And that’s probably not going to happen. But you might get a cool story idea out of this scenario if you keep thinking about it…wait. Concentrate. How can you make this better for readers? What giveaways can you do? When can you write in the prequel? When could you post the prequel? Should you tweet and ask? Is that what you should tweet next? Is there anything you can tweet next? Just be yourself. Have fun. This is fun. Why am I sweating? I need more coffee. Maybe I’ve had too much coffee. What day is it again? Oh, we’re (insert same number) of days away from the release of Minutes Before Sunset.

I’m not even kidding. This is my brain.

Welcome to authordom.

~SAT

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