Tag Archives: Ernest Hemingway

#WritingTips Various Stages of Writer’s Block

4 Jan

Intro:

So, as promised, 2016 has brought new changes to http://www.ShannonAThompson.com. I’ll still have guest posts sometimes on Mondays, but it’s mainly going to be reserved for popular past posts. They will either be rewritten or posted as is (depending on if the information has changed or not since then). Example? Today’s text is more or less the same, but the photos/gifs are new.

Today’s post was originally posted on August 12, 2014. The original post can be found here. Right now, I’m picking them with Random.Org, so stick with me while I try to figure out another method. If there is one you loved that you want to see updated, don’t hesitate to ask for it! I’m open to suggestions.

Various Stages of Writer’s Block

Oh, the dreaded writer’s block. The horror of the static pen. The silence of untapped keyboards. The banging of your forehead against the desk.

We’ve all been there—some of us more than others—and that’s why we can all relate to it (and hopefully laugh at it). So I wanted to share the various stages of writer’s insanity.

Stage One: Staring (a.k.a. Denial)

Oh, no. Oh, no. This is not happening. This cannot be happening. I have a deadline. An actual deadline! (Okay. So I set the deadline myself, but still!) I do not have time for this. I NEED to be able to write.

200-6

Stage Two: Pacing (a.k.a. Panic)

Why is this happening?! ::breathes heavily for five minutes:: Okay. I got this. I will get through this. I just need to walk away for a little bit. Okay. Never mind. I need a drink. Drinking is good. Ernest Hemingway used to drink. “Drink write, edit subor?” Why can’t I write drunk? I can’t even spell! Oh, god. I’ll never be good at this.

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If you have not seen Midnight in Paris, shame on you.

Stage Three: Running away (a.k.a. More Panic)

I just need to relax. How do I relax again? Reading! I love reading. I can tackle my TBR pile in no time. ::sits down with book:: Who is this author? Why do they write so…so perfectly? Why can’t I write like this? I’ll never write something this lovely. ::throws book across room:: I can’t read right now. Who am I kidding? I need to step away from the books. I know! I’ll go for a walk, and I’ll look at the stars. The stars are nice. ::goes outside:: It’s cloudy. Great. Of course, it’s cloudy.

If you haven't seen Silver Linings Playbook, double shame on you.

If you haven’t seen Silver Linings Playbook, double shame on you.

Stage Four: Return (a.k.a. Let It Go)

All right. ::sits down at computer:: What the hell is wrong with this manuscript? What is wrong with me? (Two hours pass, nothing changes.) ::finally puts computer away for the night:: I just need a break, a nice dinner, and a good night’s sleep.

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And you expected a gif from Frozen.

Stage Five: Acceptance (a.k.a. Overcoming It!)

::wakes up in the morning after the worst day ever:: I feel rested. Why is my protagonist sitting in my computer chair? ::stands up and crosses the room. Protagonist types with one hand and hands you a coffee with the other as you read over their shoulder:: “Oh! That’s what I did wrong.” I forced everything, but now it’s resolved. Writer’s block, you silly thing.

Time to sit down and write again.

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Cats are the best.

~SAT

The Bad Bloods cover reveal happens THIS Wednesday, January 6. Three lucky helpers will win an exclusive sneak peek of November Rain, part one, and of course, even more of you will win as additional events take place. Simply sign up for my newsletter by clicking here for your chance to win. (Your information will never be given away, you can unsubscribe at anytime, and I only send out a newsletter once a month at most.)

Starting your 2016 Reading Challenge? Minutes Before Sunset, book 1  in The Timely Death Trilogy, is FREE: 

Minutes Before Sunset, book 1:

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Seconds Before Sunrisebook 2:

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Death Before Daylightbook 3:

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#MondayBlogs: Different Writing Techniques of Famous Writers

6 Apr

Intro:

I love info graphics. In fact, I’m a little obsessed with them. So, when Cindy Bates – a freelance editor and writer for Best Essay Tips – contacted me with her very own info graphic to share, I just knew I had to share it. Below, you’ll find a photo that outlines the Different Writing Techniques of Famous Writers.

Different Writing Techniques of Famous Writers 

Being a prolific and excellent writer is never easy. It took years to the world’s most famous and topnotch writers to be able to publish their work. For those who are aspiring to become one, possessing this skill does not happen overnight but you can definitely learn many things from famous writers. To improve your writing skills, constant practice is important. The best way to do this is to have your own journal. When you have your personal journal, you can freely write down your thoughts. You get to have your own space where you can express yourself without restraints and inhibitions. Apart from owning a journal, it is also known among famous writers that in order for you to be skilled in writing you also have to be a wide reader. By forming these habits, you can start having your own personal time for writing and to practice not just writing as a skill but as well as an art.

Writing techniques

Want to be a guest blogger? I would love to have you on! I am accepting original posts that focus on reading and writing. A picture and a bio are encouraged. You do not have to be published. If you qualify, please email me at shannonathompson@aol.com.

~SAT

#WW: The Lonely Writer

14 Jan

#WW: The Lonely Writer

Writing can be lonely. The career often demands hours of solitude – aside from our characters – and while our characters can be very real to us, there are still those days where a living, breathing human being might be nice to talk to. Most of the time, this urge only comes to me when I can’t find the strength to face my characters, and one of those times is right now.

I won’t call it writer’s block. I don’t believe in it. Writer’s block is almost a hysteria to me. But I can admit that I currently have writer’s depression – well, in reality, I think it’s safe to say I am depressed – but calling it writer’s depression allows me to focus on how my sadness affects my writing life.

quote-writing-at-its-best-is-a-lonely-life-organizations-for-writers-palliate-the-writer-s-loneliness-ernest-hemingway-344093

Ever since losing my publisher, it has been difficult. It has been hard to face my characters, and for more reasons than one. The main one is the idea of admitting to them that their stories might never be told. After all the work we’ve done together, it’s hard to admit this, even if it’s not entirely for certain. Other issues arise when I think about how I’m truly just talking to myself, even though talking to my characters does not feel that way at all. The strangeness bubbles up when I can admit that I’m okay with sounding crazy, but I’m not quite sure how to tell my characters about all of the changes that have taken place in my life…so, I’ve been avoiding them. It sounds silly, I know, but it feels a lot like not having the energy to visit with friends after you’ve had a rough week. You’re too tired – a bit too sensitive – and you don’t want to take out your emotions on your friends, so you stay home to avoid hurting your friendships.

I don’t want to destroy my characters.

You see, when I go through a rough time, I generally write a lot, but I write new things: a poem, a shiny new plotline, a card, this blog post. I don’t like writing in whatever I was writing in beforehand because my mindset has been altered for the time being, and during this time, I don’t want to accidentally disrupt the flow of a previous manuscript or scene or character. (Because this has happened before.)

It’s entirely insensible, but I understand that this is how my writing style works. On the contrary – if a character gets too demanding (like a best friend who shows up spontaneously to forcibly drag you out of your dungeon of Cheez-Its and blankets and kittens) then, I make a hesitant exception, and I try to listen to them, and this is generally when I realize little details have been missing from the manuscript before. So, I add them, and I slowly crawl out of my writer’s hole, and I pick up a pen, and I try again, and eventually, I know my characters – and my readers – still love me in the same way I still love them, in the undying way I love writing no matter how lonely it gets.

It is simply nice to talk about it with someone sometime.

Thank you for listening,

~SAT

P.S. Because I’m not writing right now, I do have a lot of free time for additional services! I connect authors with book reviewers and interviewers. I edit stories. I even create photos and give advice on social media. (And I like to believe my prices are far beyond fair. Seriously. I buy a Jimmy John’s sandwich for lunch.) Check out the full list of Services right here or email me at shannonathompson@aol.com.

The Unconventional Working Habits of Brilliant Writers

14 Oct

Today is another fantastic post written by Ninja Essays. Shannon is taking a slight break, but I have a lot of announcements today that I hope you check out, including news about a radio interview, a reality T.V. show, and book bloggers.

On October 15, Whispers in the Dark radio will be hosting a LIVE interview from 8 – 9 p.m. (CDT). I hope you all listen in. We’ll be talking about Take Me Tomorrow and so much more. So click here to check out the radio’s page, and tune in tomorrow night.

I also have an array of wonderful people I want to thank today.

The first shout out goes to The Big Break Legacy, a reality T.V. show, for quoting Seconds Before Sunrise! Thank you for your support! The second goes out to Deborah Wong for nominating ShannonAThompson.com for the One Lovely Blog Award. I nominated Tune-In-NanaAj, So She Says, Fraser Sherman’s Blog, Author Dana Ellington Myles, and thedailyopine. Last but definitely not least, I have three fantastic book bloggers who reviewed Take Me Tomorrow the past 48 hours. (Please click the blog names to visit their full reviews and websites):

Southern Bred, Southern Read brought out the giggling author in me when they wrote, ” I personally would love to run into Noah anywhere… whoosh ya boy sounds dirty hot! He makes my cheeks blush and my eyebrows wiggle. *pulls out paper fan and cools off in true southern fashion*” But don’t worry. They got into the dangerous part in their review, so check it out!

The Book Spa spoke about the “refreshing take on the Dystopian genre…It has an interesting plot, is well written and is action packed.” And so is their review!

The latest review was written by The Incorrigible Reader, and she wrote, “If you are looking for an exciting story (and maybe a little romance)Take Me Tomorrow is an exciting read that I would highly recommend it.” Find out why in her full review!

Thank you to all of these wonderful people!

Unusual_work_habits_of_great_writersThe Unconventional Working Habits of Brilliant Writers

Creative geniuses are never linked to the ordinary habits normal people have. Their minds, their lifestyle and approach to work are completely different from what we would expect. Some of the world’s greatest writers had working routines that fell within our understanding of “normal”, but others had an approach that deviates from the picture we imagine when reading their novels.

Did you know that Ernest Hemingway wrote his lengthy novels while standing up? Maybe we should all try that sometimes and see if our minds would come close to being as genius as his. How would you imagine George Bernard Shaw working on his novels, plays and short stories? Vladimir Nabokov, Francis Scott Fitzgerald and Vladimir Nabokov had unusual approach to their work as well.

The belief of a “tormented genius” is more than a deviation from normality; it’s a state that has been reflected in the work and lifestyle of creative masterminds from the beginning of time. Great intelligence and creativity cannot be tamed within the boundaries of “normal”.

The following infographic created by NinjaEssays reveals the working strategies of some of the most brilliant writers throughout history. This information surely puts their work into a new perspective. 

Various Stages of Writer’s Block

12 Aug

Announcements: 

The latest review of Take Me Tomorrow is in! Trials of a wanna-be-publisher writer states, “Take Me Tomorrow asks a lot of questions around thorny issues in today’s society without becoming preachy in its message…As I have come to expect from Shannon, this book is well-crafted, engaging and very well-written (pretty much a given for this author). While the genre may be classed as ‘Young Adult’, don’t let that fool you; Take Me Tomorrow is an intelligent and thought-provoking piece of writing and one I highly recommend you check out.” And I highly recommend you read her entire review by clicking here

Various Stages of Writer’s Block

Oh, the dreaded writer’s block. The horror of the static pen. The silence of untapped keyboards. The banging of your forehead against the desk.

We’ve all been there – some of us more than others – and that’s why we can all relate to it (and hopefully laugh at it). So I wanted to share the various stages of writer’s insanity.

Stage One: Staring (a.k.a. denial)

Oh, no. Oh, no. This is not happening. This cannot be happening. I have a deadline. An actual deadline! (Okay. So I set the deadline myself, but still!) I do not have time for this. I NEED to be able to write.

Computer Guy Meme

Computer Guy Meme

Stage Two: Pacing (a.k.a. panic)

Why is this happening?! ::breathes heavily for five minutes:: Okay. I got this. I will get through this. I just need to walk away for a little bit. Okay. Never mind. I need a drink. Drinking is good. Ernest Hemingway used to drink. “Drink write, edit subor?” Why can’t I write drunk? I can’t even spell! Oh, god. I’ll never be good at this.

Photo by Reddit

Photo by Reddit

Stage Three: Running away (a.k.a. more panic)

I just need to relax. How do I relax again? Reading! I love reading. I can tackle the TBR pile in no time. ::sits down with book:: Who is this author? Why do they write so…so perfectly? Why can’t I write like this? I’ll never write something this lovely. ::throws book across room:: I can’t read right now. Who am I kidding? I need to step away from the books. I know! I’ll go for a walk, and I’ll look at the stars. The stars are nice. ::goes outside:: It’s cloudy. Great. Of course, it’s cloudy.

Photo from addfunny.com

Photo from addfunny.com

Stage Four: Return (a.k.a. facing the problem; then, letting it go)

All right. ::sits down at computer:: What the hell is wrong with this manuscript? What is wrong with me? (Two hours pass, nothing changes.) ::finally puts computer away for the night:: I just need a break, a nice dinner, a good night’s sleep.

Stage Five: Acceptance (a.k.a. overcoming it!)

::wakes up in the morning after the worst day ever:: I feel rested. Why is my protagonist sitting in my computer chair? ::stands up and crosses the room. Protagonist types with one hand and hands you a coffee with the other as you stare over their shoulder:: “Oh! That’s what I did wrong.” I forced everything, but now it’s resolved. Writer’s block, you silly thing.

Photo from memorise.org

Photo from memorise.org

Time to sit down and write again.

~SAT

December’s Website Wonders

23 Dec

A few days ago, I found out that Minutes Before Sunset hit #953 in Fantasy and #935 in Romance-Paranormal on Amazon. It’s very exciting to be in the top 1,000. Thank you for your support! I hope you’re enjoying the read this holiday season. 

Tis’ snowing here in Kansas land.

Tis’ snowing here in Kansas land.

Today is my half-birthday. I’m simply mentioning it because I LOVE half-birthdays, and I thought that I would celebrate today by sharing a bunch of exciting and helpful websites I’ve come across for readers and writers. (I always share them on my Author Facebook Page.)

I did this last month and randomly throughout the year, but I made the decision to share these articles at the end of every month. This is a little earlier than I’m planning, but I don’t want to interrupt the holiday season with the websites. The articles below are organized by Writing, Reading, and Articles to Spark the Imagination. I hope you enjoy them as much I did.

Writing:

The 20 Most Controversial Rules in the Grammar World: I would love to debate these.

Words of Wisdom: 101 Tips from the World’s Most Famous Authors: Very interesting to read. Creative tips, beginner tips, fiction tips, poetry, and more from Ernest HemingwayMark TwainAnton ChekhovOscar WildeE. B. White, and others.

Reading: 

100 Awesome Open Courses for Bibliophiles: Free courses over information about the history of books and manuscripts, linguistics, foreign literature, ancient texts and more.

These Stereotypes About Book Lovers are Absolutely True, and That’s a Good Thing: very cute list.

15 Timeless Observations from History’s Greatest Dystopian Novels: there’s a reason these novels challenge the way a reader looks at society.

25 Banned Books You Should Read Today

Articles to Spark the Imagination: 

20 Abandoned Places in the World: Imagine what happened here. Imagine what could happen here.

17 Mysteries Awaiting Explanations: Maybe your novel will be the explanation everyone is looking for.

Join me on FB!

Join me on FB!

And, just for fun, someone added a few of my quotes to QuoTelly.com – Best Quotes on the Planet.

Hope everyone is staying warm! 

~SAT

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