Tag Archives: Facebook

Help: I’ve Returned to an Old Piece of Writing, and I Can See Influences From My Past

20 Feb

Recently, I have truly enjoyed writing up my personal posts instead of focusing on writing or publishing tips. Sharing my story opened up a channel for me to hear your stories, and it was really nice getting to know more of you on a deeper level. If I continue this in the future, I hope to hear more from others. If you have an idea of a topic – any topic really – you can always comment below and suggest one. I will even credit your blog as the inspiration for the post. No matter what, thank you for reading and commenting. 

Today, though, I wanted to talk about a topic that is very much a personal twist on the writing spectrum. Yes, writing is always personal to the writer, but I wanted to discuss how certain writings can be influenced by a particular time in your life and/or how it can affect the writing process when you return to it later. The reason for this is simple: I’m currently going through it, and I wanted to talk about it in the hopes of reaching out to other artists who have experienced the same range of emotions I have,which include confusion, guilt, acceptance, and understanding.

If you follow my interviews, then you know I am already planning for which one of my novels will be published after Seconds Before Sunrise. (But I hope you’ll take a moment to check out Seconds Before Sunrise by clicking here.) Although readers might be expecting Death Before Daylight, I am moving towards publishing a new novel altogether before the last book of the trilogy. From this point on, I will be referring to this new novel as TMT.

When I went back to edit TMT, I found some surprises I wasn’t expecting:

There are some heavy influences that I could not see before. When I was originally writing it, I was in my freshman year of college. At the time, I could not see any correlations with my life in my science-fiction world. Now that I’ve been removed from the novel for a few years, I can interpret it more clearly. I can see old acquaintances in the characters. I can hear dialogue that sounds like a stranger I met. I can see where I mixed a scene together by blending a field by my dorm room and a forest by my old house. I can see my husky, Shadow, in the dog the protagonist cherishes.

This is Shadow - my buddy. Unfortunately, he is no longer with us, but he loved snow just as much as me.

This is Shadow – my buddy. Unfortunately, he is no longer with us, but he loved snow just as much as I do. (Probably more, of course.)

This was all unexpected, and – if I may be bold – difficult in many areas, because it brings up a lot of old memories I have since let go in one way or another. I believe this is a struggle many artists may face at one time or another. When we write in present time, we might not realize we have placed our friend in a novel as a protagonist’s cousin. Years later, after we’ve had a falling out with that friend, it is a struggle to return to the novel’s mindset where you must love that “cousin” you can now see was someone very real and dear to you but no longer is.

But it’s okay. There are many ways to accept these moments. They aren’t all bad. In fact, I would say most of it isn’t bad. As my posts normally go, I repetitively say, “It’s all about attitude.”

When you return to these older works, hoping to make them better, you can accept where the influences come from for what they are. Just accept them, and dive into it with the same passion you have today. Eventually, I have noticed that I am adding more influence from my current life into TMT, instead of letting my past life define it. It’s an interesting area to explore, because it’s the blending of me – my past, my present, and my future – and it brings a sense of serene acceptance.

Here are three thoughts that helped me through this:

A. Be prepared to feel this way. There’s nothing to be guilty or ashamed or feel any weirdness about. It’s natural. Think of it this way, it would be impossible to go sit in your high school parking lot without remembering a few times you were there. Art can be the same way. If you wrote it five years ago, don’t be surprised if memories from five years ago sneak up. It’s okay. Enjoy it, and change it if you want to.

B. You’re an artist – it’s bound to happen. You are inspired by life, after all.

C. If you are disturbed or upset, that’s okay, too. Put the writing down. Try not to be hard on yourself about it. The past isn’t always a place people are comfortable with. Write something new!

I actually asked about this topic on my Facebook Author Page, “Have you ever associated your novel (or a book that your have read) with a certain time in your life? If so, when you go back to edit it and/or reread it, have you seen influences you didn’t see before? Is this easy or difficult to comprehend and how do you think it affects the writing and/or reading process?”

Join me on FB, and your responses might be used next!

Join me on FB, and your responses might be used next!

Here are two fantastic answers,

The J. Aurel Guay Archive: “I wrote half a novel during a very transitional time of life. I set it down for several years and when I came back to it, I couldn’t find the motivation to finish it because I had progressed through that stage. I will finish it eventually, but it will change fundamentally as they open questions on which the novel turns have been answered in my life. I just can’t write it from the same frame of reference anymore. You can find a snippet here.”

Tanya Taimanglo: “My romantic comedy, Secret Shopper was cathartic for me. It resembles so much of my life, although I insist it’s fiction. (It is). The death of my father, elements of a bad break up and finding real love made its way onto the page. It was written years ago, and when I do reread it, I cringe at how much truth I allowed out there and I’m reminded of how much growth I’ve made. In some ways, it’s like a journal I’ve made public. I can’t undo it, just embrace its truth and move on.”

What about you? Have you ever returned to a writing and saw past influences you didn’t see at the time of writing it? How did you cope with it?

~SAT

Why I Love My Facebook Author Page

4 Feb

First, I would like to thank Heather B. Costa at Trials of a wanna-be-published writer for stating, Minutes Before Sunset is a fun and well-paced read, full of witty dialogue and thrilling action that keeps you entertained the whole way through, especially the final twist which took this reader by surprise.” Read her entire review here. Her website is a fantastic place for aspiring writers and avid readers.

 Now, onto today’s topic:

Like most people, I am on Facebook. In fact, I have three different Facebook pages – Shannon A. Thompson, The Timely Death Trilogy, and November Snow – but Shannon A. Thompson is the page I spend the most time on, and I wanted to talk about why I love having a Facebook page as an author. I will also add some tips to increase your traffic.

Join me on Facebook while we talk about it :D

Join me on Facebook while we talk about it 😀

Why I Love It:

It’s popular, it’s fun, it’s fast, and it has lots of different kinds of media – including statuses, events, offers, pictures, and link options. You can also schedule posts, which allows you to be present, even when you can’t be. But my favorite part is how you can link it to your other social media places – like Twitter, blogs, and more. You can also use Facebook as your Facebook fan page, so I can visit other authors pages as “Shannon A. Thompson” without using my personal profile. This allows other users to come to my page, see who I am, and/or why I was on the other pages at all. Hopefully, we’ll be able to connect.

Because I have to acknowledge it:

Facebook has made a lot of changes, attempting to stop people on their own Facebook Fan Pages to stop connecting with followers. One of these changes was when Facebook stopped allowing pages to invite their own followers to events by the page (meaning, you must be personal friends with them to invite them anywhere.) Seems ridiculous – just like many of the changes – but I still think it’s worth it to have a Facebook presence. I look at it like this: Just because it’s hard, doesn’t mean we should give up. It means we should try harder. We just have to help each other know the best ways to connect, so here are three tips I’ve put below for you:

Here are a few tips:

A Facebook Change Authors Need to Know About! – Writer, Lisa Goldman posted this, and I am so glad she did. Facebook is an ever-changing place. We are constantly adjusting to their changes, and this post helps you optimize your post with a little trick known as “link-shares.”

The Power of Facebook for Authors: I think this article summarizes some great information. My favorite part that they discuss is the content one should be posting, which is anything that “helps you amuse, entertain, educate, engage.” On my page, I try to post types of information like this, and I attempt to switch it up. One day, I might share an informative article, the next day might showcase what I’m up to in my future writing plans.

Because I love Nathan Bransford, I have to include a post of his: Facebook Pages vs. Facebook Profiles – this is for those of you who aren’t sure which type they should have. I understand pros on both cases, but I chose to have a Facebook page rather than a profile simply because I know too many readers who don’t feel comfortable enough to add authors on their profiles, fearing that they are too personal. That being said, I’m open-minded to it, but I’m also researching more information on how FB is planning to change in the future, and so far, I think the FB pages will have more ways to appeal to fans soon. (I will share information as I come across it, especially on my Facebook page.)

I hope these tips help! If you have any, feel free to share below. (In fact, please share!) And discuss away about Facebook land. 

~SAT

Donate to ShannonAThompson.com

Donate to ShannonAThompson.com

Photography and Writing

12 Jan

First – if you like Facebook groups for authors, editors, and/or any one to do with writing, here’s a fantastic one for the Author Extension Community. It’s just another way to meet more people willing to support other artists.

Second – I want to thank Sarit Yahalomi at Coffee & Books & Art for reviewing Minutes Before Sunset: “I can always appreciate a female character whose purpose is not only to look cute and pretty in the arms of her leading man but to actually show some attitude and who knows how to fight back.” Check out her entire review here.

I joined Instagram. Believe it or not, this actually has to do with my post today. I didn’t plan on talking about photography and how it has affected my writing life, but I thought sharing my surrender to Instagram was a good way to open up this little discussion that has more to do with my past than my current life. I would love it if you would join me there. I will probably (mainly) take fun photos of cats, coffee, and my writing adventures, and I hope to see your photos, too.

But what do photos have to do with writing?

I used to love photography. I still do, but I meant to say that I used to participate in photography. At one point, photography actually overcame my writing – which wasn’t a surprise, considering my father worked for Kodak for 25 years, and our house was full of one-time-use photograph machines. I used to have a beautiful camera that sadly died a number of years ago. I have been weary about getting a new one, only because I need a new laptop first, but I miss it – a lot.

I found creativity behind the lens just as I find adventures behind words today. I used to spend hours walking through empty fields and forests, imagining all of the magic that could exist in one backyard.  Below is actually a photo I took in my front yard, and – fun fact – it was used on the back cover of Minutes Before Sunset.

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A part of this is now the back cover on Minutes Before Sunset.

At some point in my childhood I realized the magic I obsessed over was in the simplest of things – in the broken bottle cap or the abandoned farmhouse – because it came down to perspective. 

A farmhouse wasn’t just a barn that no one wanted – it was a mystery, a creaking doorway into the unknown. Perhaps this is why articles about abandoned places inspire me so much. They leave room for the imagination in reality rather than forcing the imagination while sitting in an empty room. It’s fresh air, so to speak.

The magic found in creating art is discovered by challenging a perspective. 

This is what photography has to do with writing – for me, it’s about how we see the world, but it’s also about trying a new hobby to enhance a talent (or taking a moment to get away from the keyboard and out of the house.) I’ve shown how I’ve used photographs in a book to keep track of writing, but there’s more to photos than simply staring at them in the same sense that reading words is different than writing words down.

The point of this – honestly – isn’t about getting you to love photography but rather sharing my experience with realizing that I might be able to further my love for writing by dabbling back in my love for photography. 

So, try it with me if you want – go back in time, remember something you used to love to do, even if it was rarely, and attempt to love it for a day again. Enjoy it like a vacation or rededicate yourself to practicing it again in 2014.

I know I will be. In fact, in the future I will be blogging about why the photo below is symbolic to my writing. If you recall, it was used as the placement photo before the cover to Seconds Before Sunrise was revealed, and there’s a very good reason for that. I’m looking forward to sharing that reasoning soon.

What does this have to do with Seconds Before Sunrise?

What does this have to do with Seconds Before Sunrise? You’re about to find out.

~SAT

New Page: Tips

10 Sep

If you follow my Author Facebook Page, then you already know I’ve been spending the day updating ShannonAThompson.com. I’m excited, because I’ve been talking about this update for a while, but I finally found some spare time (even thought it’s because I’m sick and sitting around in bed.) But I’ve added the “Tips” page. And, yes, it’s already up on the bar.

So what is the “Tips” page?

It is a collection of all the writing, editing, and publishing tips I’ve ever posted about. It also includes helpful websites and inspirational ideas at the bottom. From now on, I’ll be adding each of my posts to this list, so you can easily return to it in the future.

Check it out, and let me know if you’d like to see it set up different or anything else added! I’m always up for suggestions, and I look forward to continue on with more writing tips.

But, just for fun, the Minutes Before Sunset Facebook Page has a new cover photo:

1185128_254947201296502_898182923_n

~SAT

Updates: Chapter Two, Book of the Month Nomination & New Cover Photos

6 Jun

June 8th Update: My Facebook Author Page went over 400 likes tonight! Thank you for the support, everyone! Your kindness encourages the future in the best way an author can hope for.

Just a reminder: I am going on vacation, and I will be back Wednesday, June 12th. Until then, check out my new cover photos on my Facebook pages, help me by voting for my novel in the “Book of the Month” nomination from Goodreads, and check out chapter two from Minutes Before Sunset.

Book of the Month Nomination:

Minutes Before Sunset has been nominated for “Book of the Month” for July on Goodreads. If you click the link, you can vote too by seconding Christie (message 19) or any of the others who’ve voted for me. I’d really appreciate the support!

Special thanks goes to voters and supporters: Christie, Raymond, Amber, Silver Wolf, Greg Kelly, Kristy Feltenberger Gillespie, Stephanie, Nadine, and Vickie Kayuk! I really appreciate the votes! They really help, and I appreciate all the support I can get.

Goodreads: 4.55 average rating, 11 ratings, 7 reviews, added by 34 people, 23 to-reads.

New Cover Photos: 

As many of you know, I have three Facebook pages, which include the latest updates of Shannon A. Thompson, Minutes Before Sunset, and November Snow. As of yesterday, I’ve updated the cover photos of Shannon A. Thompson and Minutes Before Sunset to represent that specific page more directly. They’re below, but feel free to click the links and “like” the pages!

Shannon A. Thompson Facebook Cover Photo

I chose this collage, because it includes my three publications, and I thought it represented my history and future. I love being able to share my works, and I cannot wait to continue to do so.

three3

Minutes Before Sunset Facebook Cover Photo

Before I had an “Available Now” photo, but it’s been one month, and I thought the cover needed a change–something directly about the novel while hinting as to what the book was about. If you’ve seen the November Snow page, then you may recognize this format: I used the cover with the most popular quote from Goodreads.

MBScover

Because I’ll be gone for one week, I thought I’d leave a sneak peek into chapter two of Minutes Before Sunset. Feel free to read it below. However, I want to clarify that the novel has indentions on paragraphs and such, but WordPress won’t allow me to add them. You don’t even have to open a PDF file! 

Chapter Two: Eric:

I was raised with three simple rules:

  1. Fight defensively and offensively.
  2. Under no circumstances is it safe to reveal your identity. (Unless it’s Urte, Pierce, Camille, or anyone else the elders deemed an exception.)
  3. Win.

The last rule is my favorite, because of the dishonesty. Win didn’t mean win. It meant murder. It meant I had to kill the second descendant, the power of the Light, and I had no choice. I would get blood on my hands.

I brushed my hand along the shivering trees as my gaze darted around the darkening forest. I rarely had time to leave our underground shelter and use my powers, and I didn’t feel like wasting my night chasing Camille around in the dark.

I threw my senses out around me. The forest reeked of evergreen and pine. I could feel every prickly leaf and see every shadow. From stump to stump, I searched the darkness for Camille’s body heat. No one could avoid my radar.

Bingo. I grinned as I locked onto a girl by the river. I sprinted through the thicket, pushing past scraping branches and leafless oak trees. As I neared the forest’s opening, my body sunk into the shadows, and my skin tingled as it morphed into the chilly air. It was the greatest feeling—other than flying, of course—and I relished in the moment. The blackness of night flowed with me as I floated along the trees, the leaves, or snow. I was enveloped in silk.

I only solidified when I reached the forest’s edge. Just as I thought, a girl stood on the river’s guardrail, but she wasn’t Camille.

She didn’t have Camille’s white hair or mischievous dark eyes. In fact, this girl didn’t even look Camille’s age. She was my age, and she had the dark hair, pale eyes, and the pale skin complexion that our sect had.

She was undoubtedly a shade, but I didn’t know her.

My fingers gripped my jacket as I moved backwards, trying to conceal myself in the darkness, but the girl spun around and stared at me. She was perfectly still when her purple eyes met mine. She didn’t budge. Instead, she pointed at me, and the dark magnetically trailed her fingertips.

“Who—” She stepped off of the railing, and her eyes widened. “Who are you?”

I put my hands in front of me and stepped out of the forest. This must be one of Camille’s illusion jokes.

“Who are you?” she asked, backing up against the river’s guardrail.

I didn’t respond. Instead, I flew through the shadows and reappeared in front of her. My body heat escaped me, and she froze, completely petrified by my closeness. I laid my hand on her cheek, expecting her to disappear like any of Camille’s illusions, but she didn’t. She was real, and we were centimeters apart, teetering over the edge of the river.

She didn’t move. I had the ability to hypnotize any shade, but I hadn’t used any power. She was shaking—shivering—beneath my touch, and her heartbeat thundered her energy through my veins.

How odd. She was powerful, yet fear suffocated every bit of her being.

“Shoman!”

A shout split the air, and I sensed a body rushing through the forest. Camille was coming for me. “Where are you?”

Reflexively, I released the girl and turned to the forest, waiting for Camille to appear. Over here, I said, sending her a telepathic message. Immediately, she appeared in a beam of light.

Her dark eyes were ablaze as she picked sticks and dried leaves from her glittering hair. “What the hell, Shoman? At least tell me where you are going if you want to be alone.”

“I was with—” I closed my mouth as I waved my hand towards the nameless girl, but the ground where she once stood was empty. Nothing. No marks or anything signifying her leave. She was gone.

Impossible. No shade had ever been able to stay off my radar, yet I hadn’t felt her leave. It was as if she had never been there.

“With who?” Camille asked, trudging up to me.

“Shh,” I held up my hand and threw my senses out.

Camille tensed, and her black eyes darted around. “What are you looking for?”

“Be quiet,” I said, spinning in tight circles. My senses were useless. Nothing was there. Not even a bat or a plane. I was being blocked.

I grabbed my guard’s boney shoulders. “Camille, who else was out here tonight?”

“No one. Everyone is at the Naming,” she said, rolling her eyes. “If you haven’t forgotten, you’re supposed to be there.”

“I don’t care,” I said, ignoring the ceremony of the last harvest. It was hard to forget. A thick layer of frost coated the dying grass, and I knew that the first layer had fallen yesterday morning. As the first descendant, I always went, but my father hadn’t in years, and I was beginning to forget the point.

Camille touched my arm. “Is something wrong, Shoman?” she asked, widening her eyes. “Was someone here?”

“No,” I lied, patting her palm. “Let’s go,” I said. I dissolved into a shadow.

Minutes Before Sunset is available as an ebook and paperback on Amazon (4.5 Stars from 15 reviews), Barnes & Noble (4 stars from 5 reviews), Smashwords, Kobo, Apple, Sony, and more. 

I hope everyone has a great week! I’ll try to send pictures from my vacation. If I don’t expect some on June 12th.

~SAT

Publishing Tips: Marketing Your Book

21 Apr

Website Update: April 22: 8:00 a.m.: Shannon A Thompson Facebook Fan Page hit 200 likes today! Thank you 😀

10 days before the Minutes Before Sunset release (AEC Stellar Publishing) ! 

I know many of you are fellow authors or are working to become one, so I thought I’d dedicate today’s post to bringing attention to your work. (Especially since I’m often asked how I gained as many followers as I have) So below is a list of aspects to consider along with websites before you begin marketing (which I used myself to get where I am today.)

1. Readers: There’s no mistake that they are my number one is my list. Readers are vital to an author’s ultimate success. A writer could have the best publishing team for their story available, yet if they don’t have a relatable and entertaining story, an author won’t make it. The readers, in the end, decide, and that’s why I really suggest connecting with your fans as much as possible. Have an email they can send you messages, questions, and reviews too. Connect with them on all the websites below (don’t force them to join, but rather connect with the ones that are already on the sites.) Create a Facebook page they can follow (since many don’t feel comfortable sharing their personal Facebook, and I completely agree with that.) and talk to them on there. Figure out what they like and what they didn’t like about your book. Be willing to change. Be even more willing to help them change by supporting their dreams to become a writer or something else entirely. Personally, I love searching around the web for fellow writers, readers, and bloggers. I follow their blogs, and I often like or comment on material. That way, I find readers, rather than expect them to come to me, and I don’t expect them to follow back. They can reciprocate or not, because I’m coming to them as a reader (not a marketing writer) and respecting their work. If they check me out, and decide to support me, that’s great!

Oh! And never stop writing. Even if you're drenched in monsoon rain in the middle of an airport.

Oh! And never stop writing. Even if you’re drenched in monsoon rain in the middle of an airport.

2. Internet: Join as many social networking sites as possible for both yourself and your work. If you click any of the website below, you’ll be taken to my personal page, but you can see how authors and readers can connect through these communications. You can even join, too!

  • Have a blog: If you don’t have a publisher yet, you’ll surely run into this in the future. Blogs are essential in connecting with readers, so you’ll almost be expected to have a website. If you don’t already have one that you keep updated on a regular basis, I’d suggest creating a page with a blog. I update mine (this very page) every two days (three if I’m having a particularly busy week) with information on entertainment, writing, and publishing. This allows my blog to be focused but also fun to write and fun for others to read. 
  • Facebook: No one can deny how popular Facebook has been over the past couple of years. Even when you create a new profile, you fill out your “likes,” and that’s where authors and books come in.

    One part of my Interactive interview on Twitter with Sezoni Whitfield.

    One part of my Interactive interview on Twitter with Sezoni Whitfield.

  1. Author Page: Create a page for only you. This way you can announce all of your books, events, and other announcements all on one page. Personally, my author page has the most activity, compared to my individual book pages.
  2.  Novel Fan Page: This is purely created so fans can put your book in the “favorite books” section and/or follow news specifically about the book they enjoyed. I have one for both “November Snow” & “Minutes Before Sunset.”
  • TwitterTwitter is wonderful for finding writers and readers. Simply use a hashtag (#) and find anyone under the sun that is discussing the topics you want to connect with. I’ve also done an interactive interview on Twitter with Sezoni Whitfield, and I gained 200 followers in one days.
  • Publisher’s page: If you have a publisher, be sure to include their page, information, and more contacts. This allows your readers to see what you’re up to professionally, and it also gives them the opportunity as writers to see how the situations differ and work.
  • GoodreadsShelfariBoth of these websites are focused on readers. It allows a place for readers to connect and discuss what they thought about a book. Add your novel to join in on the conversations which include reviews, favorite quotes, bookshelves, lists, and trivia.

    Flyer used

    Flyer used

  • Amazon Author Central: For both published and self-published authors, you can control your author page on Amazon. This is wonderful, because you can connect it with your novels, blogs, Twitter, and Facebook. You can also announce events.
  • Linked In: This is mainly for professionals you’ve connected with: publishers, agents, cover artists, editors, etc. But I recommend joining it, because you never know which one of those very types of people may come across your resume.
  • All Author’s ListA free database that enhances your ability to appear on the internet.

Think about the internet this way: the more you’re involved, the more likely your name will pop up on a Google search. Don’t hesitate to spread yourself across many social networking sites, because readers go to many different websites to find authors.

3. Now Market! 

Now that you’ve joined the World Wide Web, you can start sharing your name and news all over. Without going into extravagant details on all those websites again, however, I’ll give other opportunities.

  • Find local businesses willing to support you. Print out flyers and share them with their customers. I have to thank Ice Fire Hookah in Shawnee, Kansas for doing this for me. It is very kind to know such a great group of people willing to support the arts.
  • Accept interviews, but also apply for them: Currently I’ve done five interviews for Minutes Before Sunset, and I’ve added them to my Extra’s Page: If you want to interview me, please don’t hesitate to send an email to ShannonAThompson@aol.com
    1. Michael Fedison (March 11, 2013)
    2. Tim Flanagan (March 13, 2013)
    3. Dan Pantagram (April 16, 2013).
    4. Sezoni on Twitter’s #WritersKaboodle (April 18, 2013)
    5. The Magill Review (April 19, 2013)
  • Create Extras: This allows readers to interact with your work. I’ve talked about this before, so if you’re looking for ideas, visit my Extra’s Page. I also have 2 other extras coming this Wednesday !
  • Exchange Reviews: There are many authors like yourself that are wanting more reviews and buys. I’d suggest reviewing others’ works anyways, but if you don’t have a lot of time, I could understand why asking for them to exchange reviews is good. Try it out and see where you go from there.

I know today’s post was tedious, but if you have any questions or want further elaboration, comment below, and I will surely get back to you!

April 24: One Week To Go: Sneak Peek Chapter

Publishing Tips: Introduce Extras

6 Apr

25 days until the Minutes Before Sunset release. 

When I posted Shannon Summary: Six Months In, I received a lot of inquiries about how to bring more readers to your blog and/or novels. I thought about this for a while, and I’ve come to a lot of conclusions, but one of them in particular kept repeating itself: connect with our readers.

I spend a lot of my free time reading other blogs (Twitters and Facebook pages too). In order to connect with readers, I never expect them to find me. I go to them, and I prove that I care. I think this is really important, because then there is a connection between the writer and the reader (especially if they are a writer too.)

So what can you do once you get passed that step?

Create opportunities.

Like my cover contest for Minutes Before Sunset, I try really hard to involve my readers with my writings (because, ultimately, it is for them.) But I understand if others aren’t comfortable with that. So I thought about other things, and I came up with this idea (mainly because a lot of published authors actually have pages like this themselves) and decided to do it myself.

My Facebook Author Page is over 150 likes too :]

My Facebook Author Page is over 150 likes too :]

Create an “Extras” page for your novels and/or writings. This allows reader to see Fan Art and/or anything you’ve created while writing. You can also add possible soundtracks, along with anything else you find enhancing towards the experience of your novel. I think it’s important to have pages like this, because it can be further entertainment for your readers while also giving the opportunity of teaching your writing methods.

I’ve added “Extras” pages for November Snow & Minutes Before Sunset. (Click the links to see them.)

These pages will include Interior/Exterior Maps, Soundtracks, and Fan Art (along with anything else I think will enhance the experience of the novel and writing tips.) Whenever I add something new, I’ll be sure to post an announcement on my blog and Facebook Author Page.

So check it out (and if you have anything you’d like to see, let me know, and I’ll add it!)

~SAT

April 8: Relax & Read: The Unmemntioable by Erin Moure

As an "extra" to my life: I have a collection of frogs. Don't ask me why, because I honestly have no clue. People seem to buy them for me, and this is my most recent one (of 6). He's from Puerto Rico.

As an “extra” to my life: I have a collection of frogs. Don’t ask me why, because I honestly have no clue. People seem to buy them for me, and this is my most recent one (of 6). He’s from Puerto Rico.

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