Writers, It’s Okay To Log Out

27 Mar

Social media is a must for writers today. Connecting with readers through Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other platforms is easy and welcomed, but it can get overwhelming. With the myriad of ways we have of posting information—sometimes live—it’s easy to succumb to publishing pressures. Personally, I still struggle to figure out where my balance is in all the different types of social media platforms. Why? Because they are constantly changing and so is my schedule, but one thing remains the same. Making sure I’m interacting with readers and writers through social media is always near the top of my To-Do list.

There is also staying up-to-date in the publishing world. Whether you’re reading Writer’s Digest or Publishers Marketplace or one of the millions of amazing publishing blogs out there, there’s always something to read, to share, to consider.

But that doesn’t mean you should get lost in social media.

Extra tip: Pick only the social media platforms that you love. You don’t have to do everything.

One of my main pieces of advice to writers is to stop reading about writing and actually start writing. Not that reading about writing is bad. (I mean, I write about writing on this blog.) But if you’re reading more about writing than actually writing, then it might be time to log out. There’s only so much you will learn from studying writing. The best way to grow as a writer is to actually write for yourself. And I’m not an exception. Recently, I had to remove my social media from my phone. Mainly Facebook and Twitter. Why? Because I found myself spending more time reading my feeds than reading books. And quite frankly, it was starting to affect my writing. For example, I sometimes get so wrapped up in trends I forget about what I WANT to write—and honestly, what you want to write is generally the most important thing, because that passion will show in your voice.

Don’t get me wrong. I love these platforms. Twitter, in particular, is an important platform where writers get involved in publishing issues that need to be addressed. I also love joining Twitter events, because they are fun and fast and a great way to meet others who love reading and writing as much as you. But sometimes, I just need to read or watch TV or go for a jog or explore a bookstore without all the scrolling and pinging of notifications.

Setting boundaries and taking care of yourself is important, especially when you feel overwhelmed. In fact, I feel much better now that I’ve taken those apps off my phone. Admittedly, it probably won’t stay that way forever, but it is helping me stay focused on the recent conference I attended as well as my upcoming book releases in April and May. I’m sure I’ll put them back on my phone soon. But until then, I’m grabbing a coffee and sitting on my roof this morning. And I’m definitely logging out.

Don’t feel guilty for logging out. It’s okay to take a day off of marketing or tweeting or Facebooking or sharing photos of your cat on Instagram. (Though if you like that sort of thing, I often post photos of my three cats—Bogart, Boo Boo, and Kiki—via Instagram’s @AuthorSAT. If you post cats, feel free to tag me so I can see. I seriously love cats.)

You can log out, too.

~SAT

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14 Responses to “Writers, It’s Okay To Log Out”

  1. adeleulnais March 27, 2017 at 4:32 am #

    Great advice. It is easy to forget when hemmed in by social media, it’s worrying and a little scary.

  2. Charles Yallowitz March 27, 2017 at 5:32 am #

    Reblogged this on Legends of Windemere and commented:
    Some really good advice.

  3. The Animation Commendation March 27, 2017 at 10:43 am #

    Yes, social media can become an addiction or a distraction or a productivity waster at times!

    • Shannon A Thompson March 27, 2017 at 3:37 pm #

      It is just so easy to fall into that rabbit hole. Thank you for reading and commenting. 🙂
      ~SAT

  4. Don Massenzio March 27, 2017 at 4:50 pm #

    Reblogged this on Don Massenzio's Blog and commented:
    This post has a lot of truth to it. Check out Shannon A Thompson’s post on writers knowing when to log out of social media

    • Shannon A Thompson March 27, 2017 at 5:16 pm #

      Thank you for sharing, Don! I’m glad you enjoyed the post.
      ~SAT

      • Don Massenzio March 27, 2017 at 5:27 pm #

        It was a great one. You’re welcome.

  5. debyfredericks March 27, 2017 at 5:27 pm #

    I think also that if you have any kind of anxiety, social media can amp it up when you post something and don’t get the response you’d hoped for. Definitely, we need to measure how we spend our time on writing vs. promotion.

    • Shannon A Thompson March 27, 2017 at 6:03 pm #

      YES! Thank you for adding this. I think that can play a big role in social media, and it’s important to understand that. What one person might be able to handle may be really difficult for another person.
      ~SAT

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Book Marketing Woes | Shannon A Thompson - July 31, 2017

    […] will always be there, and your health matters. You are awesome. You belong. Related Articles: Writers, It’s Okay to Log Out & Taking a Writing Break and Why It’s […]

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