#MondayBlogs Weaknesses in Writing

26 Dec

Writers always have room for improvement. Even if you’re a New York Times Best Seller, you are growing every single day, and knowing what aspects to work on can definitely help your career.

How do you know what to concentrate on?

Be honest with yourself.

Most writers know what their weaknesses are. Maybe it’s those pesky fighting scenes (or kissing scenes). Maybe creating villains is really difficult for you, or world-building takes wayyyyyy too long (like five years too long).

We probably know where we need extra help, because it takes us more time than usual to overcome that particular obstacle…and that’s okay!

Understanding your weaknesses as a writer will help you overcome them and learn from them. So, here are some tips to figure them out, work with them, and beat them.

1. Make Lists!

While you’re writing, you’ll come across those tricky areas and struggle. Take note of where and how and why you struggle during particular times. Also take note of how you figured out the issues eventually. By forcing yourself to step away and reevaluate it, you’ll see more patterns, and you’ll be able to research or study that particular area until you no longer struggle as much. Want an example? I LOVE my side characters, sometimes a little too much, and while I can explore side characters, I often let them overshadow my main characters during the first draft. In the current book I’m working on, I have a note to tone down those subplots. That way, I don’t get out of control again. (And if I do, I have notes on how to fix it when I’m editing.)

Another list I love to keep outlines my crutch words. This includes words I use WAY too often and words I often misspell or just need to look out for in general. Crutch is actually one of my misspellings. I always use clutch instead. Why? I have no idea, but I know that I need to search for clutch and crutch every time I’m editing. I also search for all those pesky, repetitive expressions like smile, nod, frown, smirk, laugh, etc. There’s nothing better than finding out you used the word smile six times on one page and deleting them ALL before anyone else reads your Crest commercial…er, I mean, book.

writerweaknesses2. Read, Research, Practice!

If you’re anything like me, you might struggle with romantic scenes. (Seriously, I feel like a Peeping Tom every time I write a romantic scene. It really ruins everything for me, which is probably why most of my novels have very little romance in them. But moving on…) I know this about myself. I know to take my time on these scenes, and I realize I’ll edit them a hundred times over. But one thing that I find that fixes my issues more than anything else is reading. By reading, I will see how authors evoke emotions I struggle to explain. Whenever I come across a romantic scene in a book I’m reading, I definitely pay more attention than usual. I might even take notes on how and why it was a successful scene, so that I can consider how to utilize those tools in the future. This is where research and practice comes into play. Once you start realizing what works for you and others, you can try out your new skills on short stories or individual scenes. By writing and rewriting those areas you struggle in, you will start to feel more confident and comfortable over time. (Plus, we could always use another excuse to read.)

3. Remember One Thing!

Weaknesses do not make you a bad writer. Everyone has them. Yes, even J.K. Rowling. Maybe you have a bad habit of dream sequences or too many flashbacks or your villain falls flat every time. That’s okay! As long as you understand that these are issues, you can fix them. Look at it this way, isn’t it better to know about them, and be honest about them, than be oblivious or ignore the issue at hand? Writing is a journey. Some scenes will work perfectly; others might need more work. Take your time. Embrace the challenges, and prove to yourself that you can overcome them.

~SAT

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8 Responses to “#MondayBlogs Weaknesses in Writing”

  1. Charles Yallowitz December 26, 2016 at 5:49 am #

    Reblogged this on Legends of Windemere.

  2. debyfredericks December 26, 2016 at 11:16 am #

    Yeah, I’m always trying to find alternate expressions for “nodded” and “looked.”

  3. authorangelachristinaarcher December 26, 2016 at 11:25 am #

    I struggle with sex scenes, too, which is why I only have like one (maybe two) in each novel. I’m so glad to read that I’m not alone in that. Lol. Thanks for the great list!

    • Shannon A Thompson December 26, 2016 at 1:36 pm #

      Oh! I don’t write sex scenes, to be honest. (I write clean YA.) I struggle with even kissing lol but romance at all is basically the same thing. I hope it gets easier one day! I’m working on my romance scenes. 🙂
      ~SAT

      • authorangelachristinaarcher December 26, 2016 at 1:38 pm #

        Lol. Oh. Well, I do write adult historical romances, but my scenes are like a build up and then SLAM! I shut the door. And I shut it the quicker the better. Once I write those scenes, I refuse to touch them and let my editor handle them. Lol.

      • Shannon A Thompson December 26, 2016 at 1:39 pm #

        I totally get that! It’s kind of funny n because as an editor, I have no problem helping others with a romantic scene, but creating one has always felt awkward to me. But give me a battle scene, and I’m all for it.
        ~SAT

  4. mickaellamoyogo January 29, 2017 at 1:13 am #

    this is extremely helpful, especially for a new blogger like me

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